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HowTos

today's howtos

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HowTos

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

New features in GNOME To Do

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GNOME
HowTos

GNOME To Do is an application that manages a simple set of to-do lists. To Do was built by Georges Stavracas, a frequent contributor to GNOME software including Calendar and Nautilus, during Google Summer of Code. It’s designed to be the best tool to manage what you want to achieve with your projects and daily life.

GNOME 3.20 (available in the upcoming Fedora 24 release) brings many new enhancements, some of which expand the functionality of GNOME To Do. I spoke with Georges about what these changes bring, and what the future holds for To Do.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
HowTos
  • Discover Ring, a Secure Cross-Platform Alternative to Skype

    If you’re on Linux, you’ll be well aware that the Skype client sucks hard as it never packs as many features like the version of the app on other operating systems and hasn’t been updated since 2014.

    [...]

    The application is available on desktops via the main platforms (Linux, Windows, and OSX) — other systems require compiling from source — while on mobile, it’s accessible through Android and Windows Mobile and supports voice, video, and conferencing calls.

  • Caravel data visualization

    One aspect of the heavily hyped Internet of Things (IoT) that can easily get overlooked is that each of the Things one hooks up to the Internet invariably spews out a near non-stop stream of data. While commercial IoT users—such as utility companies—generally have a well-established grasp of what data interests them and how to process it, the DIY crowd is better served by flexible tools that make exploring and transforming data easy. Airbnb maintains an open-source Python utility called Caravel that provides such tools. There are many alternatives, of course, but Caravel does a good job at ingesting data and smoothly molding it into nice-looking interactive graphs—with a few exceptions.

  • SSH Is For Dummies Too!

    If you’ve been hanging around the Linux ecosystem for any length of time, you’ve most likely heard about SSH. For those who may not already know, SSH is a secure shell that allows you to log into any computer, anywhere in the world, that is running an SSH server. You might think that it’s just for system administrators and serious Linux nerds, though. Wrong! SSH is actually super easy to get setup and it can be a very powerful tool, even if you only have two computers running on a small home network. Once you get the hang of using it, you may find yourself wondering how you ever got along without it.

  • Parental Control App Timekpr (Fork) 0.3.6 Released With Ubuntu 16.04 Support

    The Timekpr development stopped a while back, but it was later continued with a fork, called Timekpr-Revived, which works with recent Ubuntu versions.

  • [Older] Treat regular expressions as code, not magic
  • How to Install the Beautiful Arc GTK Theme on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  • Transposing rows and columns: 3 methods
  • How to set up system locale on CentOS 7

today's howtos

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HowTos

Get Started with Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Ubuntu 16.04 was released in April, and it’s a great release. Ubuntu is generally known as an extremely user-friendly distribution, so it’s easy to get up and running quickly. That said, there are a few things to do -- depending on your needs -- to get most out of your system.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers (Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium”, Regulation)

  • Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium” — Best Kali Linux Alternative Coming With New Features
    The Release Candidate of Parrot Security OS 3.0 ‘Lithium’ is now available for download. The much-anticipated final release will come in six different editions with the addition of Libre, LXDE, and Studio editions. The version 3.0 of this Kali Linux alternative is based on Debian Jessie and powered by custom hardened Linux 4.5 kernel.
  • Regulation can fix security, except you can't regulate security
    Every time I start a discussion about how we can solve some of our security problems it seems like the topics of professional organizations and regulation are where things end up. I think regulations and professional organizations can fix a lot of problems in an industry, I'm not sure they work for security. First let's talk about why regulation usually works, then, why it won't work for security.

Phoronix on Graphics

AMD's gaming-optimized AMDGPU-PRO driver for Linux is in beta

AMD has been working on a new Linux graphics driver stack, and it’s finally becoming usable. You can install the gaming-optimized AMDGPU-PRO driver on Ubuntu 16.04 today, and Valve just added it to the latest beta version of SteamOS. Read more