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HowTos

How to Switch Between Chrome OS Stable, Beta, and Dev Channels on a Chromebook

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OS
HowTos

Google, like many other software developers, offers multiple development channels for their Chrome and Chrome OS products, and we'd like to show you today how easy is to switch between the Stable, Beta, and Dev channels.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

today's leftovers and howtos

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Misc
HowTos
  • Shadow Icons Looks Great With All Themes, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Shadow icon theme is a new comer for Linux desktop, it looks beautiful with all kind of themes. It is meant to be modern clean and customizable, the primary color of this set most likely bluish and many apps icons are in round shape. So basically this theme is mixture of round and normal (square) shape icons, lets see where this theme will head in the future, it should choose shape what users asks. As creator mentioned this icon theme is his first so please bare any bugs or missing icons. You can report bugs or suggest new icons to include in this set via this link. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Obsidian Icon Theme Based On Faenza And It Revives Desktop

    Obsidian icons are based on Faenza icon theme which is around from some years but the development of Faenza is almost stopped, hope creator again give some time to his popular icons. Obisidian-1 icon theme offers icons for panels, toolbars and buttons and colourful squared icons for devices, applications, folder, files and menu items, there are two version included to fit with light or dark themes. It is in active development which means if you find any missing icon or problem with this icon set then you can report it via linked page and hopefully it will be fixed in the next update. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Input Updates Submitted For Linux 4.13 Kernel

    Dmitry Torokhov submitted the input subsystem updates today for the Linux 4.13 kernel merge window.

  • [Video] Qubes OS Part 1: Overview and Features
  • Success

    In November 2012 I started running an irregular rebuild of all Mageia packages on x86_64, discarding the built packages, to just detect build breakages.

    At first it was running a few times a month, now once a week, except before releases where I run it twice a week.

  • How to install Debian+LXDE on ANY Android Tablet

    Running a linux distro on android devices is a hot topic these days, and why not? After all, android is already based on linux kernel, but a pretty much locked-down and dumbed-down version of it. The OEM doesn’t give you root and in most cases, not even an open source bootloader and/or kernel. That way, its good for maybe the most average user who doesn’t care about the OS and just want to use their phones. But for a power user, that’s not enough.

  • Not So Fast, Slick or Why Did it Take Devuan Two Years to Replace Systemd?

    Recently, a guy asked me two questions: If it is so easy to uninstall and switch init systems why did it take devuan 2 years to figure it out? Why are so many struggling to make something so easy work?

  • Some Extra Game Tests Showing AMDGPU+RadeonSI Improvements Since Ubuntu 17.04

    In yesterday's Windows 10 Radeon Software vs. Ubuntu 17.04 + Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev comparison I tested both Ubuntu 17.04 out-of-the-box and then upgraded it to the Linux 4.12 kernel and Mesa 17.2-dev. Here are some complementary tests I did with a larger set of Linux games.

    These results show the stock Linux 4.10 + Mesa 17.0.3 performance of Ubuntu 17.04 compared to the same system upgraded to Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev for showing the bleeding-edge Linux gaming experience.

  • Privileged Ports Cause Climate Change

    I'm thirty seven years old, which is like ninety nine in programmer years. I'm old enough to remember the earliest days of the public Internet and the first boutique Internet service providers. My first online account was via one called Internet Access Cincinnati (IAC). It provided dialup modem access to a Sun SparcStation 10 where users could run such venerable old terminal applications as elm (a mail client), emacs, lynx (text-mode web browser), and of course IRC.

    Later they added the ability to dial into a CSLIP (predecessor to PPP) terminal server and connect your own Linux or Trumpet WinSock equipped Windows system directly to the Internet with a real bona-fide IP address.

    [...]

    This is all probably water under the bridge. Chances are the path forward will be to develop true secure container multi-tenancy and to achieve with containers what should have been achieved by extending the Unix permission model to networking in user space.

    The purpose of this post is to show how small decisions that nobody really thinks about can have dramatic effects on the future evolution of technology (and society). The 1970s decision to use port numbers as an in-band signaling mechanism to implement cross-system security validation might have been, in retrospect, a trillion dollar mistake that pushed the evolution of the Unix platform down a path of significantly greater complexity, resource use, and cost.

    But hey, maybe it's not a done deal yet. There's over a dozen Linux distributions and most of them are doing more or less the same things with a slightly different spin. Implementing something like this would be an interesting way for one of them to differentiate. The first step would be to implement networking permissions something like what was discussed above and to propose it as a kernel patch. For backward compatibility you could make it something enabled via a sysctl setting, or maybe a module (if modules can make changes that deep).

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Still Working Towards Video Acceleration, Unity 7 Woes

    Will Cooke of Canonical has shared another weekly status update for the work going into the GNOME desktop for Ubuntu 17.10 and their other efforts this cycle.

  • Tidbits from Smartphone Wars - Carl Zeiss, HTC, Sammy and look out for Huawei vs iPhone next two quarters.
  • How to fix IPMI KVM JAVA BMCMD5withRSA and is treated as unsigned error
  • How to Handle a Hi-Dpi Screen in Linux
  • Accessing your Linux server from within Microsoft Windows
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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 14

One of the latest thing we wanted to work on as we highlighted on our previous posts is the notification for new emails or download experience on the Shell. We already do ship the KStatusNotifier extension for application indicator, but need a way to signal the user (even if you are not looking at the screen when this happens) for new emails, IM or download/copy progress. Andrea stepped up on this and worked with Dash to Dock upstream to implement the unity API for this. Working with them, as usual, was pleasing and we got the green flag that it’s going to merge to master, with possibly some tweaks, which will make this work available to every Dash to Dock users! It means that after this update, Thunderbird is handily showing the number of unread emails you have in your inbox, thanks to thunderbird-gnome-support that we seeded back with Sébastien. Read more

Download latest Linux-based LibreELEC Krypton -- Kodi addons like Exodus and Covenant will work

The Kodi media center is facing a lot of scrutiny in the media lately. Some people feel that the negative coverage is "fake news." It is important to remember that Kodi is not illegal. With that said, it can be made so with piracy-related addons. Since Kodi is open source, even if the developers removed the ability to install addons, other people could easily fork the code to add it back. Pandora's box cannot be closed. Many people that use Kodi do so with a dedicated Linux-based operating system, such as the excellent LibreELEC. You see, these distros exist only to run the open source media center, meaning there are no resources wasted on unnecessary things. Today, LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.1.2 BETA sees release. You can install it immediately, and don't worry -- your addons like Exodus and Covenant will work fine. Read more

Arduino unveils tiny, battery powered MKR boards for LoRa and 3G

Arduino launched two 67.6 x 25mm boards for wireless IoT nodes based on Atmel’s SAM D21 MCU: The MKR WAN 1300 offers LoRa, and the MKR GSM 1400 provides 3G. At the Maker Faire in New York this weekend, Arduino unveiled two new “MKR” IoT boards with the same 32-bit, Cortex-M0+ based Microchip/Atmel ATSAMD21 MCU used by last December’s MKRZero. Available for pre-order, with shipment in November, both the LoRa enabled, $39 Arduino MKR WAN 1300 and the 2G/3G ready, $69 Arduino MKR GSM 1400 measure 67.6 x 25mm. That’s only slightly larger than the 65 x 25mm MKRZero and earlier, WiFi-enabled MKR1000. Read more

AndEX Puts Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 64-Bit on Your PC with GAPPS and Netflix

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton has released a new build of his Android-x86 fork AndEX that leverages Google's Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 mobile operating system for 64-bit PCs with various updates and improvements. Read more