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HowTos

Extending OpenOffice.org: Turning OpenOffice.org into a document conversion tool

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OOo
HowTos

Linux.com: One of the less well-known features of OpenOffice.org is its ability to run as a service. You can put that ability to some clever use. For example, you can turn OpenOffice.og into a conversion engine and use it to convert documents from one format to another via a Web-based interface or a command-line tool. JODConverter can help you to unleash OpenOffice.org's file conversion capabilities.

The simplest way to make databases in OpenOffice.org

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OOo
HowTos

Free Software Mag: Do you need to make a database, but fear it’s too much of a pain or you don’t have the right tools? Don’t worry: it’s easy, free, and useful, too. Use the free OpenOffice.org office suite to get your data in shape for mail merges, queries, or useful analysis of your business data.

Exploring the /etc directory: Rc and Init directories

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HowTos

ITtoolbox Blogs: In my previous "Exploring the /etc directory" I talked about the inittab file and what it does. Now I am going to explore the directories it uses and how they work.

Virtual Hosting With vsftpd And PostgreSQL

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BSD
HowTos

This document describes how to install a vsftpd server that uses virtual users from a PostgreSQL database instead of real system users. I could not find any tutorial like that on the internet, so when that configuration finally worked for me, I decided to publish it. The documentation is based on FreeBSD 6.2 which I was recently forced to use (I usually use Debian). Nevertheless the document should be suitable for almost any Linux distribution as well (may require very small amendments)

Installing Virtualbox and Windows in Ubuntu

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HowTos

Arun's Blog: I have successfully installed Virtualbox in my Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop. Installation was pretty simple. Configuration and installing Windows took some time. I’m listing the steps I followed to get it installed and configured.

Extending OpenOffice.org: Creating self-running presentations with IndeView

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HowTos

Linux.com: Although OpenOffice.org doesn't allow you to create self-running Impress presentations, there is a tool that can help you with that. Using IndeView, you can convert your Impress presentations into a self-contained package that can run off a CD or DVD on Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows.

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn

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Ubuntu
HowTos

With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial shows people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop.

Extend OpenOffice.org

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OOo
HowTos

LinuxJournal: If you have a nifty macro or a nice Writer template you want to share with other OpenOffice.org users, publishing them on the Web along with detailed installation instructions is probably not the best way to go. Fortunately, OpenOffice.org supports extensions-small installable packages that provide added functionality.

Create CD / DVD database Labels in OpenOffice.Org under Linux

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OOo
HowTos

nixcraft: If you’re serious about music or DVDs, at some point you cross the threshold of having more than you can keep track of easily. The box full of index cards has served its purpose; it’s time to move on to storing information about your CDs and DVDs in a database.

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Small Console Menu Utilities

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