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HowTos

Virtualization With Xen On Debian Lenny (AMD64)

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HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a Debian Lenny (5.0) system (AMD64). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Securing Apache From Spiders and Flies

  • Change Keymap in Gentoo Linux
  • How to Generate Barcode in OpenOffice.org
  • Conky
  • Set Up a Free Business Server With Ubuntu
  • Speed up your system by avoiding the swap file
  • Digiband - Drumming & Guitar simulator in openSUSE
  • Try out the Metacity compositor
  • floating point exception - gentoo
  • vnstat - a console-based network traffic monitor
  • Flash crashes/hangs Firefox when switching to fullscreen
  • A softer --as-needed
  • How to creat zip files on Linux compatible with Windows
  • How to set wallpaper in Fluxbox with Nitrogen

Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part III: matchit.vim

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Software
HowTos

catonmat.net/blog: This is the third post in the article series “Vim Plugins You Should Know About“. This time I am going to introduce you to a plugin called “matchit.vim“.

Simple Tips for the New User to remember about Linux

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Linux
HowTos

raiden.net: There are numerous little things that a new user should learn and remember when it comes to Linux. These will also save you from a lot of trouble as you learn Linux.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How To Use Scripts & Plugins In GIMP To Extend Its Functionality

  • Howto - Easily Install 9 Really Nice Ubuntu themes
  • Automating ssh and scp across multiple hosts
  • Set up OpenDNS on Ubuntu
  • The Fast Way to Read Compressed Files on Linux
  • 10 Open Source Implementation Tips
  • Do You Want Multiple Kernels on Your openSUSE System?
  • Package Management Basics on Debian GNU/Linux
  • HOWTO : Chinese characters Adobe Flash 10
  • Have KDE Ask for your SSH Passphrase on Login
  • Change The Message Of The Day In Ubuntu/Debian

10 Tips for Writing Efficient Bash Scripts

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HowTos

hacktux.com: Bash is the default command line interface for many Linux distributions and a powerful scripting language. Here are some suggestions that will keep your Bash scripts efficient and lean.

KDE 4.2 installation/upgrade on Debian,Kbuntu and OpenSuse

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KDE
HowTos

linuxpoison.blogspot: The KDE Community announced the immediate availability of "The Answer", (a.k.a KDE 4.2.0), readying the Free Desktop for end users. KDE 4.2 builds on the technology introduced with KDE 4.0 in January 2008. After the release of KDE 4.1, which was aimed at casual users, the KDE Community is now confident we have a compelling offering for the majority of end users.

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • Remote Desktop Between Ubuntu/Linux and Windows, Part II

  • Full screen mode with toolbars in Opera
  • Inkscape Tutorial - Raised Lettering Effect
  • 7 tips how to make your computer healthy
  • List drives by UUID in Ubuntu

Postfix Virtual Hosting With OpenLDAP And Dovecot On Ubuntu 8.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This how to will allow you to configure a Postfix mail server with virtual hosting. Virtual hosting means that you can add as many maildomains as you want and subsequentially as many mailboxes for these domains as you want.

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More in Tux Machines

FLOSSophobia

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook. Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected. Read more

Today in Techrights

Hands on With elementary OS Powered Centurion Nano Laptop by Alpha Store

If you want to buy a new laptop, no doubt you should consider the Centurion line. It will be a good choice for you, Linux aficionado. As well as for your Windows-addicted husband/wife/employees. The Centurion Nano is certainly not a “gamer” laptop. However, besides that particular use case, and for an interesting price, you will get a very competent computer, 100% compatible with Linux and usable for a broad range of tasks. Read more

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.