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HowTos

Sound problems?

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HowTos

A couple of times I’ve encountered problems with the sound card on Debian boxes. Some notes I’ve found that may help others having difficulties:

* Check the permissions on /dev/dsp, and make sure that the relevant user(s) are in the audio group in /etc/group. You may need to log out & back in again for this to take effect.

Howto: Use rtorrent like a pro

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HowTos

I’m a huge rtorrent fan. I can’t imagine why anyone would use anything else, unless there’s something funky the big-name programs can do, that rtorrent just doesn’t handle yet.

Preventing Brute Force Attacks With Fail2ban On Debian Etch

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HowTos

In this article I will show how to install and configure fail2ban on a Debian Etch system. Fail2ban is a tool that observes login attempts to various services, e.g. SSH, FTP, SMTP, Apache, etc., and if it finds failed login attempts again and again from the same IP address or host, fail2ban stops further login attempts from that IP address/host by blocking it with an iptables firewall rule.

Encrypted home partition in Linux

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HowTos

Have you ever wondered what would have happened if all the important data has been stolen from your mobile PC? For example the information about the confidential project of your company you have been working on for the last 2 years… A horrifying vision, isn’t it? Well, if you don’t want to let it come true, please consider encrypting your home drive. Here is how to do this.

How To Install VMware Server On Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to install the free VMware Server on an Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system.

Mounting file-systems by label rather than device name

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HowTos

When you're dealing with multiple drives, both fixed and removable, it can get hard to remember which is which. Remembering to mount /dev/sda1 in one place and /dev/sdc5 in another. The solution to this problem is to use labels instead of partition names when referring to them, and here we'll show how that can be done.

There are two things you need to do to start using labels:

How To pwn Your Text Files With Vim

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HowTos

Recently I did a lecture on the magical world of vim. Despite having used it for quite a long time I realize there is still far more that I could know about it, but there is also more that I haven’t published on this blog. Some of you might remember some of my earlier posts on vim [here], [here].

Assign Custom Shortcut Keys on Ubuntu Linux

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HowTos

Ubuntu includes a very limited shortcut key configuration utility which doesn’t allow you to assign hotkeys to your own applications or scripts. To get around this limitation, we can use the built-in gconf-editor utility to assign them ourselves.

First you’ll want to load up gconf-editor by typing it into the Alt+F2 Run dialog.

SSL and IPsec - An Overview

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HowTos

SSL requires applications to be modified as it operates above the TCP layer and this happens in user space in linux and other OSes. Whereas IPsec works seamlessly no matter what application and what protocol the application uses. ICMP traffic, UDP traffic and TCP all are protected by IPsec without the user or application developer worrying about it.

Introducing Ubuntu’s Add/Remove Packages

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HowTos

Last week, my fellow FOSSwire blogger Jacob introduced you to APT, the powerful package management system that is underneath Ubuntu.

The command line interface is the most powerful way to manipulate the software installed on your system, but to users who aren’t familiar with a command line interface, it can be a bit daunting.

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Proposed: A Tainted Performance State For The Linux Kernel

Similar to the kernel states of having a tainted kernel for using binary blob kernel modules or unsigned modules, a new tainting method has been proposed for warning the user about potentially adverse kernel performance. Dave Hansen of Intel has proposed a new "TAINT_PERFORMANCE" for the kernel that would proactively print a warning message about not using the kernel for any performance measurements. Dave explained in his RFC announcement, "I have more than once myself been the victim of an accidentally-enabled kernel configuration option being mistaken for a true performance problem. I'm sure I've also taken profiles or performance measurements and assumed they were real-world when really I was measuring the performance with an option that nobody turns on in production. A warning like this late in boot will help remind folks when these kinds of things are enabled." Read more

Scientific Linux 7.0 x86_64 BETA 3

Fermilab's intention is to continue the development and support of Scientific Linux and refine its focus as an operating system for scientific computing. Today we are announcing a beta release of Scientific Linux 7. We continue to develop a stable process for generating and distributing Scientific Linux, with the intent that Scientific Linux remains the same high quality operating system the community has come to expect. Please do not install Pre-Release software in your production environment. Read more

Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Now Features Linux Kernel 3.16.1

"The Utopic kernel has been rebased to the first v3.16.1 upstream stable kernel and uploaded to the archive, ie. linux-3.16.0-9.14. Please test and let us know your results," says Canonical's Joseph Salisbury, after the latest Ubuntu Kernel Team meeting. Read more