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some howtos:

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  • How To Convert Any Video File Format Under Linux

  • Fix Slow Or Hanging Thunderbird Email Client
  • How to install Chromium (Google Chome) on Gentoo Linux
  • Gedit won't save to SSHFS mount, cured
  • Get to know Linux: Removing files
  • How to setup and use YUM on Fedora Linux
  • How to get ath5k working on Jaunty
  • Jargon Jam - Repo
  • Comandline 101: Aliases for Common Commands
  • Debian Lenny 5.0.1 PXE initrd update

Virtualization With KVM On Ubuntu 9.04

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This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an Ubuntu 9.04 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

Detecting memory leaks & invalid memory de-allocation in the Linux kernel

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HowTos Memory leaks and memory corruptions are problems that can be easily introduced in code written in C or C++ and generally in any programming language that does not have a garbage collector built in, causing system crashes and sometimes, even worse, unexpected behavior, creating bugs that are difficult to be detected.

Run Windows and Linux: easy partitioning guide

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HowTos Setting up a Linux distribution isn't a difficult task anymore, but if you want to install Linux on a machine that already has a Windows installation on it, you'll have to slice your disk into smaller partitions to do so.

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.3 (x86_64)

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This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).

some howtos:

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  • Using the Bash complete Command

  • Count the Number of Files in a Directory in Linux
  • openSUSE NetworkManager and keyring
  • Lock screen on lid close
  • Command Line Basics: Navigating the File System
  • Browsing a FTP server in Nautilus
  • How to Use the Second Network Port on Your Computer
  • Create your own version of Fedora with Revisor
  • Creating Our First Module using Drupal 6 (Part1)
  • vnstat on openSUSE

Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL And SquirrelMail (CentOS 5.3 x86_64)

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This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database.

some howtos:

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  • Getting Familiar with Linux Logs

  • Making ‘ondemand’ CPU frequency scaling more responsive
  • Oz: Translating Python into Oz
  • Using SugarSync under Linux
  • Install the Firefox 3.5 Beta in Linux
  • Gentoo + X11 + No Mouse/Keyboard
  • Installing the Open Sound System (OSS) in Fedora
  • Command Line Basics: echo
  • A Newbie’s Getting Started Guide to Linux [PDF]
  • Install a Minimal Ubuntu Desktop
  • ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host
  • MBR (Master Boot Record) Backup & Restore

some howtos:

Filed under
  • How to protect Apache against DOS,DDOS or brute force attacks

  • Install BackupPC server in Centos|Rhel|Fedora
  • Changing your hostname in Ubuntu
  • Getting Fedora working in VirtualBox
  • Howto Use OpenDNS On Ubuntu
  • How to install and manage packages in Linux with RPM
  • Gmail Notify: Not Just for Win/Mac
  • Ubuntu - After the Installation
  • Setting up File Sharing in Linux with Samba
  • The Terminal: Messin’ With Files and Directories
  • Get DirectFB 1.2.* running on Ubuntu 9.04 (with multi app support)

The Perfect Server - Mandriva 2009.1 Free (x86_64) [ISPConfig 2]

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This tutorial shows how to set up a Mandriva 2009.1 Free (x86_64) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc

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More in Tux Machines

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux With Radeon / GeForce GPUs On The Latest 2018 Drivers

Given how fiercely the latest open-source AMD Linux driver code is running now up against NVIDIA's long-standing flagship Linux GPU driver, you might be curious how well that driver stacks up against the Radeon Software driver on Windows? Well, you are in luck as here are some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 as well as the GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 Ti while being tested both under Microsoft Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS while using the latest AMD/NVIDIA drivers on each platform. Read more

Android Leftovers

Debian-driven DragonBoard expands to 96Boards Extended spec

Arrow has launched its $199 DragonBoard 820c, an open-spec, Snapdragon 820E based 96Boards CE Extended SBC with an audio header and a second 60-pin connector in addition to the usual 40- and 60-pin headers. Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed DragonBoard 820c was teased over a year ago and then announced by Qualcomm last month in conjunction with the release of the Snapdragon 820E SoC. We briefly covered the SBC earlier this week as part of Linaro’s multi-board roll-out — Linaro said that it would soon qualify the 820c as compliant with its new AI-focused spec. There was no shopping link at the time, but now you can purchase this successor to the DragonBoard 410C for $199. The open-spec SBC runs Debian Linux, with planned support for OpenEmbedded. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Google Patches All Intel Chromebooks Against Spectre Variant 2 with Chrome OS 65
    Google released a new stable version of its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, build 65.0.3325.167 (Platform version: 10323.58.0/1) bringing the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations to more devices and a bunch of other improvements.
  • VIDEO: Cooking With Linux: Lots and Lots of Word Processors! The Tuesday Linux Journal Show
  • How to use netstat in GNU/Linux
  • Cutelyst 2 released with HTTP/2 support
    Cutelyst the Qt/C++ web framework just got a major release update, around one and half year ago Cutelyst v1 got the first release with a stable API/ABI, many improvements where made during this period but now it was time to clean up the mistakes and give room for new features.
  • Fedora 28 and GNOME 3.28: New Features for Eastern Europe
    This time this is not fake, edited, patched, nor a custom build from COPR but the real screenshots of the unmodified downstream Fedora 28 planned to be released on May 1 this year. Here is how the default calendar widget in GNOME Shell looks in Greek, Polish, and Ukrainian:
  • Stephen Smoogen: /usr/bin/whoami
  • Debian CEF packages
    I've created some Debian CEF packages—CEF isn't the easiest thing to package (and it takes an hour to build even on my 20-core server, since it needs to build basically all of Chromium), but it's fairly rewarding to see everything fall into place. It should benefit not only Nageru, but also OBS and potentially CasparCG if anyone wants to package that.
  • Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #151
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 1)
    For quite some time, I have been interested in alternative operating system technologies, particularly kernels beyond the likes of Linux. Things like the Hurd and technologies associated with it, such as Mach, seem like worthy initiatives, and contrary to largely ignorant and conveniently propagated myths, they are available and usable today for anyone bothered to take a look. Indeed, Mach has had quite an active life despite being denigrated for being an older-generation microkernel with questionable performance credentials. But one technological branch that has intrigued me for a while has been the L4 family of microkernels. Starting out with the motivation to improve microkernel performance, particularly with regard to interprocess communication, different “flavours” of L4 have seen widespread use and, like Mach, have been ported to different hardware architectures. One of these L4 implementations, Fiasco.OC, appeared particularly interesting in this latter regard, in addition to various other features it offers over earlier L4 implementations. Meanwhile, I have had some success with software and hardware experiments with the Ben NanoNote. As you may know or remember, the Ben NanoNote is a “palmtop” computer based on an existing design (apparently for a pocket dictionary product) that was intended to offer a portable computing experience supported entirely by Free Software, not needing any proprietary drivers or firmware whatsoever. Had the Free Software Foundation been certifying devices at the time of its introduction, I imagine that it would have received the “Respects Your Freedom” certification. So, it seems to me that it is a worthy candidate for a Free Software porting exercise.
  • Samsung Announces Galaxy Tab Active2, a Rugged Android Tablet for Mobile Workers
    Samsung announced today the Galaxy Tab Active2 rugged Android tablet designed for mobile workers conducting business outdoors in industrial locations, under harsh weather, and other difficult conditions.