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HowTos

Lazarus: Pascal and Delphi Rise Again

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Software
HowTos

Linux Online: Lazarus is a RAD tool, or Rapid Application Development tool that runs on the three major platforms (Linux, Windows and Mac OS). It is very similar to Delphi, a popular RAD developed by Borland. And like Delphi, it uses a variant of Pascal for its underlying programming language. In Lazarus' case, it's Free Pascal.

Howto: Install Xfce 4.4.1 on (X)Ubuntu 7.04

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HowTos

Tuxcity: Ubuntu Feisty comes with an xubuntu-desktop package delivering a Xfce4.4.0 Desktop environment. However, some of us (like me) want the latest of the latest, so if you are not faint hearted and feel like upgrading your Xfce desktop to the latest stable version here is how.

Also: Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Installation notes
And: Install Pidgin 2.0.0 on Ubuntu Feisty (with all plugins)
And: Automatix Alternatives

Dual Monitors with NVidia in Ubuntu

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HowTos

ubuntu geek: It’s quite a pain to get dual monitors working your first time using Linux, however I hope this guide will make the process relatively quick and painless.

Limiting the number of user processes under Linux

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HowTos

503 Service Unavailable: Some weeks ago there was a controversial discussion at Kriptopolis (a Spanish site mainly dedicated to computer security) about a supposed Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerability present in many Linux distributions and some BSDs.

Cropping multiple images the same way

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HowTos

Linux Tutorial Blog: Sometimes you'll want to crop the same area from multiple images (think of taking the contents of the same window from a load of screenshots). Of course, you could fire up your favourite image editor to select and crop over and over, but, as usual, there is a better way. This short tutorial describes an efficient way to do this for a theoretically infinite amount of images.

Installing Ubuntu Studio 7.04 - Linux For The Creative

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HowTos

Howtoforge: Ubuntu Studio is a multimedia editing/creation flavour of Ubuntu, built for the GNU/Linux audio, video, and graphic enthusiast or professional. It is an official derivative of the Ubuntu open source operating system and comes with applications such as Ardour2, Wired, Hydrogen, Blender, Inkscape, Pitivi, and many more, as well as a beautiful dark theme (read the release notes to learn more). This walkthrough shows how to install it.

Understanding, setting up and using Kmail

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KDE
HowTos

Raiden's Realm: One of the first questions that any new user to Linux is going to ask is, "So how do I get my email?" The answer is simple. Kmail.

Ubuntu on Thinkpad X41 - Working With Amarok

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HowTos

Shane O’Sullivan's Blog: This is one of a number of posts detailing how to install Ubuntu 6.10 (codename Edgy) on a Thinkpad X41. This post focuses on using the amazing music player Amarok.

Linux Wi-Fi: Supercharge a Buffalo

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HowTos

enterprisenetworkingplanet: The popular DD-WRT project was initially an offshoot of the original Linksys firmware for the WRT54, but has since undergone a complete rewrite, and now uses the OpenWRT kernel. DD-WRT is a fine upgrade for your WRT54 wireless router, or any similar device under other brand names, and there are a lot of them.

Making waves with Audacity

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HowTos

Free Software Mag: For me there is nothing quite as relaxing as the sounds of the beach. The slow crashing of waves and the gentle lapping of water in the tide pools really helps me find my inner calm. Of course, I could do without the smell of rotting fish carcasses, the constantly screeching gulls and the looming threat of melanoma. So I decided to create my own virtual beach experience using some free sound clips from the internet and the free software package called Audacity.

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Has the time come to rebrand open source?

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