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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Get to the root of Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Prelinking
  • OOo: Simple Labels
  • Installing PHP cairo wrapper under Mandriva 2009.0
  • Building an OpenBSD Gateway - Part 2
  • Debug your shell scripts with bashdb
  • password protect OpenOffice.org documents
  • Check Package Dependencies with apt-rdepends on Ubuntu
  • Better Firefox in KDE4
  • Minimize All Your Applications To The System Tray In Ubuntu
  • Receive Large Files with Droopy
  • Getting Started with Linux
  • Vi mode in bash

Set your Linux alternative programs.

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HowTos

There are many things you can do in Linux and there are many ways to do them. You can have several different programs all able to do the same task and all installed at the same time. So how do you choose which one is the default program?

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 8.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu Studio 8.10 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Gitting going with git: creating your first repository

  • python: writing binary file
  • make your BIOS love security
  • How the Linux Kernel Manages Virtual Memory
  • USB Hard drive spindown fix on Linux
  • An Executive Guide to Open Source
  • Parallels Desktop 4: Installing Parallels Tools with Ubuntu as Guest
  • A graphical way to MySQL mastery
  • Problem installing PECL PHP extensions while /tmp is secured
  • Customizing Firefox for Netbooks

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Netgear WG111T working with Debian

  • Complete Backup and Restore Using “tar” Command
  • Plain English Explanation Of An Awk Statement
  • How To Add a New Hard Drive in Ubuntu
  • FTP port forwarding using Linux router
  • Data encryption and Ubuntu, Part I
  • Misguided link and --as-needed
  • Thinkpad X30 freeze if the Lid is closed Gnome
  • Automount NTFS drives in Linux
  • Using external commands in Nagios
  • How to change Duplex and/or Auto-Negotiation NIC settings in Linux?

Speed up your Internet access using Squid's refresh patterns

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Software
HowTos

linux.com: Bandwidth limitation is still a problem for a lot of people who connect to the Internet. You can improve your available bandwidth by installing Squid caching proxy server on your network with configuration parameters that will increase your byte hit rate, giving you about 30-60% more bandwidth.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Tip: Fixing e2fsprogs block on Gentoo

  • Make Linux Look like Windows XP with XPGnome
  • Doing a diff without touching the command line
  • Split lossless audio
  • OpenOffice.org Tip - Automatically Number Headings
  • Building an OpenBSD Gateway - Part 1
  • Manage your music with ID3 tag editors
  • Relationship between --as-needed and --no-undefined
  • sdparm: a utility for SCSI device

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to create automated Linux/Unix backups

  • How To Run Gnome Panel Applets in XFCE
  • Who's On Your Linux Box
  • Small tip, how to recreate fluxbox menu
  • A Guide to System Backup and Restore in Ubuntu
  • SATA: /dev/hda Instead Of /dev/sda?
  • Use Dovecot for POP3/IMAP services
  • sK1 vector in on good illustrations
  • Treat your C code like scripts with C Cod

Setting Up ProFTPd + TLS On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

FTP is a very insecure protocol because all passwords and all data are transferred in clear text. By using TLS, the whole communication can be encrypted, thus making FTP much more secure. This article explains how to set up ProFTPd with TLS on an Ubuntu 8.10 server.

How to use OpenOffice.org as a Two Pane Outliner

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HowTos

So, although OpenOffice.org does not act as a one pane outliner, we can set it up as a two pane outliner. This can be very useful for structuring long documents, or keeping scraps of disparate information in one handy file.

To do this requires two things: the use of the Navigator, and the use of headline styles when structuring your document. Let’s start up OpenOffice.org Writer and see how this works.

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Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love