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HowTos

Setting Up A Subversion Repository Using Apache, With Auto Updatable Working Copy

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Linux
HowTos

Subversion is a free/open-source version control system. That is, Subversion manages files and directories over time. A tree of files is placed into a central repository. The repository is much like an ordinary file server, except that it remembers every change ever made to your files and directories.

How to create poster presentations with Scribus

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HowTos

linux.com: Poster presentations are a common way of presenting results, proposing strategies, and explaining concepts and methods. You can create nifty poster presentations with Scribus, the free desktop publishing tool.

OpenOffice.org and mail merge: how to suppress the Address2 line

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HowTos

free software mag: Mail merges are a great way to save time, since they pull information from the same fields, over and over again with each new record in your database. There’s only one problem—all records aren’t created equal; they don’t all have, or all need, the same fields. This article solves that perpetual problem with labels.

Enable Complete Media Playback in Fedora 7

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HowTos

Just Another Tech Blog: As we all know, Fedora 7 ships without support for playing MP3s, DVDs, and many other media types that we are exposed to every day. The default repositories don't offer much help with this problem, but luckily it is an easy one to fix.

Also: Fedora 7: A Final Look

Using Ubuntu: What Package Did This File Come From?

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HowTos

the How-To Geek: How many times have you noticed a file sitting in a directory and wondered… where did this file come from? Or you are trying to tell a friend how to use a utility but he doesn't have it installed, and you can't remember what package you installed to get it.

Microphones & Skype on Ubuntu

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HowTos

geeky bits: Today I installed Skype in Ubuntu 7.04. There can be a number of problems running Skype in Ubuntu. Yet my biggest concern was getting my microphone working.

Splitting Apache Logs With vlogger

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HowTos

Vlogger is a little tool with which you can write Apache logs broken down by virtual hosts and days.

Dual Monitors With Ubuntu

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HowTos

lockergnome blogs: Over and over, I hear people asking me “how do I get dual monitors working in Ubuntu“. Well today, I will show you (note the video) how to make this easy with a fairly modern NVIDIA card, two flat screen LCDs (one DVI, the other VGA) and a little understanding how getting two monitors working in Ubuntu Linux is a snap, once you understand the basics.

Blocking ad servers with dnsmasq

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HowTos

Debian Administration: I was chatting with a colleague over IRC on Tuesday and he was complaining about the new update for Bind9 that broke his automatic blocking of ad servers. Naturally I was curious and asked him what he was talking about..

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Chromixium – An Ubuntu Based Google’s Chrome OS Clone

Today, We have come up with an interesting news for both Ubuntu and Chrome OS users. Meet Chromixium – the new modern desktop operating system based on Ubuntu that has the functionality, look and feel of Google’s “Chrome OS”. Chromixium has brought the elegant simplicity of Chromebook and flexibility and stability of Ubuntu together. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start

The first 'production' smartphone running the Ubuntu operating system is finally here. Designed and marketed by the Spanish company BQ (not to be confused with the Chinese company BQ Mobile) and made in China, the first Ubuntu Phone is based on the 4.5-inch BQ Aquaris E4.5, which normally ships with Android 4.4. Included with the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition are two copies of the quick-start guide (in four languages each, one of the eight being English), a charger (with a built-in two-pin continental mains plug) and a 1-metre USB-to-Micro-USB cable. A comprehensive User Manual is available for download from the BQ website. The list price for the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition, which is only available in the EU, is €169.90 (~£125). Read more Also: Ubuntu and Windows set to contest desktop/smartphone hybrid market Ubuntu phone that works as a desktop PC coming in 2015

Enabling Open Source SDN and NFV in the Enterprise

I recently attended the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in Shenzhen, China, to promote Intel’s software defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) software solutions. During this year’s IDF, Intel has made several announcements and our CEO Brian Krzanich showcased Intel’s innovation leadership across a wide range of technologies with our local partners in China. On the heel of Krzanich’s announcements, Intel Software & Services Group Senior VP Doug Fisher extended Krzanich’s message to stress the importance of open source collaboration to drive industry innovation and transformation, citing OpenStack and Hadoop as prime examples. Read more Also: Myth-Busting the Open-Source Cloud Part 2