Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

HowTos

What UUIDs can do for you

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you've ever looked in your /etc/fstab file, you have may have seen an entry that looks like UUID=62fa5eac-3df4-448d-a576-916dd5b432f2 instead of a more familiar disk drive designation, such as /dev/hda1. Such entries are called universally unique identifiers (UUID). You can use these 128-bit numbers to make hard disk management easier.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Creating business cards the easy way (Linux)

  • Howto: Accessing VirtualBox VDI Disks on the Host Computer
  • Tracking your tasks at the command line
  • Changing Your User Information in Ubuntu Linux
  • How-To: Install Video Codecs and DVD Support in Ubuntu/Kubuntu 8.04
  • Optimize Firefox’s memory usage by tweaking session preferences
  • Turn your machine into enterprise storage with Openfiler
  • How to Run Linux from an USB Flash Drive In 5 minutes!

Installing Games On Ubuntu With Playdeb

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Playdeb is a repository for Ubuntu games that makes it easy to install games that are available on getdeb.net. This article shows how you can install games using Playdeb on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to build a local IMAP server

  • Structure of a PAM Configuration File
  • Simple Hello World Application in Gambas
  • Restoring iptables Automatically On Boot
  • HowTo do Ethernet Bonding on Ubuntu
  • Kernel tuning with sysctl
  • How to setup an intranet with free open source software
  • Quit tailing me
  • How To: Stop DHCP from updating /etc/resolv.conf
  • exim and domainkeys on debian
  • Follow the diagrams to install openSUSE 11

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org: Knowing when to use Impress

  • Improve login time by using readahead in Ubuntu
  • Linux Wi-Fi Works With wicd
  • Use Amarok as An Alarm Clock
  • Configuring IceWM: Basics
  • Linux Performance Hunting Tips - Take Copious Notes (Save Everything)
  • Avoid OpenDNS Free DNS Service Like The Plague
  • Tip: USB key problem on Mandriva
  • DIY File Server
  • Finding Overlapping Matches Using Perl's Lookahead Assertion Matching
  • small Qt based mail biff
  • Expanding text with Snippits in Linux

Pimp your Ubuntu desktop in 7 steps!

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.howtogeek.com: Let's face it, the default theme on current Ubuntu releases is more aimed at the (boring) business folks: no transparency, no effects, no shiny icons and cool wallpapers. That's why I'm going to walk you through some easy steps to customize your Ubuntu Gnome.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting desktop effects working in Compiz/Emerald

  • MHT support in Firefox
  • Using Flashcam on Ubuntu
  • Developing/Installing OpenGL in Ubuntu
  • Clearing BASH Command History

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Gentoo: Spellchecking in GTK Applications

  • Virus scanning with F-Secure Rescue CD 3.00
  • How To Change File Type Associations
  • Extract tarballs in Ubuntu
  • Getting wireless to work in Ubuntu on a Lenovo ThinkPad X200
  • #ubuntu Q and A Vol.1 - Hardware
  • 10G database on Ubuntu 8.04
  • How to setup Boot Password (Grub)
  • Unix 101: Manipulating files - Copying, moving, deleting
  • wl wireless driver in Intrepid
  • nvidia geforce fx5500 on Ubuntu 8.04.1

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Resetting the root password on Ubuntu Linux

  • Firefox 3: Getting rid of the drop-downs
  • /etc/grub.conf explained
  • Photo KDE Tutorial 1-4: Brightness/Contrast/Gamma + Hue/Saturation/Lightness
  • Puppet - Centralised configuration management for networks
  • HOW TO: Remove the annoying KDE error when unmounting usb device
  • Ksensors: An Application To Monitor Your Computer’s Temperature

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Bluetooth GPRS with Mandriva 2008.1

  • Easily recover from a tarbomb with xargs
  • Using ext4 on Gentoo (and probably other distro's)
  • Google Chrome on openSUSE
  • Unique Sorting Of Lists And Lists Of Lists With Perl For Linux Or Unix
  • Power monitoring and logging with Apcupsd and Cacti
  • Browse the Web in Konqueror using only the keyboard
  • Four Tweaks for Using Linux with Solid State Drives
  • Managing Bash with Key Sequences in Ubuntu
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD

BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS