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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Expert's guide to configuring Conky

  • IBM Lotus Symphony 1 on Ubuntu
  • Recording in Ubuntu, Part 1
  • Delegate privileges to users with sudo
  • Fedora 9 Tips and Tricks
  • OpenSUSE Linux 10.3: Signing Self-Generated SSL Certificates as Your Own Certificate Authority
  • Quick and Dirty MySQL Backup

How To Set Up WebDAV With Apache2 On Debian Etch

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HowTos

This guide explains how to set up WebDAV with Apache2 on a Debian Etch server. WebDAV stands for Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning and is a set of extensions to the HTTP protocol that allow users to directly edit files on the Apache server so that they do not need to be downloaded/uploaded via FTP.

How To Back Up Your Files With Areca On Fedora 9

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HowTos

Areca is a personal file backup software developed in Java. It allows you to select files or directories to back up, filter, encrypt and compress their content, and store them on your backup location. Areca supports incremental backups and generates backup reports, which can be stored on your disk or sent by email. This guide explains how to install and use it on a Fedora 9 desktop (GNOME).

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to disable vim syntax highlighting and coloring

  • vim taglist plugin for developers
  • Howto: graphical logout/shutdown/reboot in any Window Manager
  • Synchronizing a BlackBerry in Linux
  • Disable Ctrl+Alt+Backspace from Restarting X Windows on Linux
  • One way to change path on Ubuntu
  • Short Tip: Move an X window in Linux with the Alt key
  • Welcome KDE apps back onto your GNOME desktop
  • Changing the default 'generic' kernel to 'server' kernel
  • Installation of Fedora 9 with Vista on Dell 1525
  • A110 mini-laptop Debian installation HOWTO
  • Tips and Tricks for Using Xen under Ubuntu or Debian
  • Alternative Installation Methods for Hardy
  • Virtualbox 1.6.0 with Ubuntu 8.04 2.6.24-17-generic kernel
  • Howto Set Gnome Calendar First Day of Week in Ubuntu
  • Changing default applications

Ext4 defragmentation with e4defrag

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HowTos

polishlinux.org: Lately I have described ok_defrag — a simple tool for defragmenting Linux file systems. Today, I want to describe a specialized program designed to defrag the new Ext4 file system.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Remove the suspend/hibernate entries from the system menu in the Gnome

  • esearch - Gentoo fun
  • Change Firefox 3's URL bar behavior
  • Profiling entire system activity with sysprof
  • Wiping your disk drive clean
  • Fedora 9 Installation Guide
  • Listadmin - Command line tool to manipulate the queues of messages
  • Living with eee: tips and tricks
  • Making openSUSE 11.0 LiveUSB : The Easiest (and Fastest) Way
  • Ebuild Protip: Only fetch from SRC_URI
  • Mklivecd on Pclinuxos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to Add a Feature to Perl 5

  • Install Nvidia Video Drivers and AWN on Fedora 9
  • Screencasts in Ubuntu, part 1
  • Add keyboard shortcuts with KeyTouch
  • Ebuild Protip: Use emerge --debug to figure out what's happening
  • Linux / UNIX View Only Configuration File Directives
  • Argument list too long
  • Ubuntu Tip:How To Get Flash Working in Opera 9.27

few more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Using NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers with Linux 2.6.25

  • Test KDE 4.1 Beta 1 with KDE4Daily
  • Ubuntu: Enabling Broadcom BCM43xx Based Wireless
  • Got Java plugin working under Ubuntu 8.04
  • Display a calendar in UNIX
  • Recovering Ubuntu after installing Windows
  • Simple Shell One-Liner To Enumerate File Types In Linux and Unix

OOo Basic crash course: Creating a simple application launcher

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HowTos

linux.com: In previous installments of the crash course, you've learned how to build a simple basket tool, a task manager, and even a word game. This time, let's take a look at how you can use the skills you picked up from those exercises to create a simple application launcher, which will allow you to start virtually any application without leaving the convenience of OpenOffice.org.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux kernel compile secrets. Part 2

  • How To Patch Perl 5
  • Use the OR operator in grep to search for words and phrases
  • Clean up Ubuntu Junk Files
  • Best Method To Reboot Remote Linux / Windows / UNIX Server
  • Controlling desktop applications with six degrees of freedom
  • Ubuntu: Disabling Service on Startup
  • removing outdated ssh fingerprints from known_hosts with sed or … ssh-keygen
  • Fedora 9: Fix No Flash Sound Issue with Firefox 3.0
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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers: digikam, KDevelop, Kate, GSoC, and Akademy

  • [digikam] Call to Test the Pre-Release of 5.6.0
    Once again a lot has been going on behind the scenes since the last release. The HTML gallery tool is back, database shrinking (e.g. purging stale thumbnails) is also supported on MySQL, grouping has been improved and additional sidecars can now be specified. Therefore the release of 5.6.0 will be (is already) delayed, as we would like to invite you to test all these features. As usual they are available in the pre-release bundles or obviously directly from the git repository. Please report any dysfunctions, unexpected behaviour or suggestions for improvement to our bug tracker.
  • KDevelop runtimes: Docker and Flatpak integration
    On my last blog post I discussed about how some assumptions such as the platform developed on can affect our development. We need to minimize it by empowering the developers with good tools so that they can develop properly. To that end, I introduced runtimes in our IDE to abstract platforms (much like on Gnome’s Builder or Qt Creator).
  • Kate 17.04.1 available for Windows
  • GSoC - Community Bonding Period with Krita
  • First month report: my feelings about gsoc
  • My Akademy Plans
    The Akademy programme (saturday, sunday) is actually pretty long; the conference days stretch into feels-like-evening to me. Of course, the Dutch are infamous for being “6pm at the dinner table, and eat potatoes” so my notion of evening may not match what works on the Mediterranean coast. Actually, I know it doesn’t since way back when at a Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla it took some internal-clock-resetting to adjust to dinner closer to midnight than 18:00.

Gaming News: Shogun, SteamOS, Dawn Of War III

Galicia continues promotion of free software

The government of the autonomous region of Galicia (Spain) will continue to encourage the use of free and open source software solutions in the public and private sector. This week, the government published the ‘Free Software Plan 2017’, outlining 110 actions. In its ‘Plan de acción software libre 2017’, Galicia announces new initiatives to promote sharing and reuse of ICT solutions. The government is to share new software solutions, but will also emphasise the reuse of existing tools, pointing to Mancomún, the region’s software repository, the catalogue maintained by the Spanish central government’s Centre for Technology Transfer, and to the European Commission’s Joinup eGovernment portal. Read more

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC
    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.
  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi
    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.
  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio
    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.
  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments
    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.
  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop
    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer. However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.
  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core
    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board. Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.