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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Use tcpdump for network debugging

  • Theme GNOME Apps Running in KDE 4.0
  • How to Easily Improve/Enhance Font Rendering in Xubuntu
  • Can you get cp to give a progress bar like wget?
  • Linux commands for “What is taking up all my space?”
  • Apt-file: Providing apt’s answer to rpm -qf
  • How to get root access in recovery mode if sudo is broken (Ubuntu)
  • Linux Perl Script To Graph Out Paging, Memory and CPU

Learn 10 good UNIX usage habits

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HowTos

element14.wordpress: Adopt 10 good habits that improve your UNIX® command line efficiency — and break away from bad usage patterns in the process. This article takes you step-by-step through several good, but too often neglected, techniques for command-line operations. Learn about common errors and how to overcome them, so you can learn exactly why these UNIX habits are worth picking up.

Screen Sharing, CLI Style

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HowTos

Tip o’ the Day: Windows users can use RDP or VNC for tech support, troubleshooting, or presentations. Linux folk have X11 or VNC. But what about command line screen sharing on a machine with no X server installed? What if the only immediate access you and your partner share is ssh?

Troubleshooting with Apache logging

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HowTos

linux.com: The Apache Web server (Apache) comes with a powerful logging framework. In the default configuration, Apache logs all errors to an error log and all access requests to an access log. The default level of logging is sufficient for analyzing traffic patterns and for getting basic information about errors, but it may be inadequate for troubleshooting purposes. Familiarity with all the logging features can help you troubleshoot the Web server or applications hosted on Apache.

How To Roll Your Own Linux Distro

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HowTos

Serdar Yegulalp: Whether you want to customize Knoppix, respin an existing distribution of the open-source operating system, like Puppy Linux, or are intent on creating your own package from scratch, we'll walk you through the process.

Find and Extract Video File Details

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Movies
HowTos

Using FFMpeg it is relatively simple to query an existing video file to find details such as video codec, audio codec, bitrates, duration and dimensions.

Master the KIO slaves

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HowTos

linux.com: Hard-working KDE Input/Output (KIO) slaves perform much of KDE's functionality. KIO slaves provide consistent access to different resources, such as filesystems, network protocols, and search functions, making them accessible to all KDE applications in a standard way.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • ATI/NVIDIA Driver install in PCLInuxOS 2008

  • KDE 4 Tips & Tricks: Enable Printing
  • Westminster Chime with Beep
  • iftop - Check and analyze your traffic
  • 6 ways to find files in linux
  • Alien - Convert RPM to DEB or DEB to RPM
  • Find How Many Files are Open and How Many Allowed in Linux
  • Quick Tip: K3b On Ubuntu with Gnome
  • Tweak Firefox's "Responsiveness" Config Setting
  • How to clone your bootable Ubuntu install to another drive
  • Use apropos to find the command you’re looking for

LILO and GRUB: Boot Loaders Made Simple

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HowTos

linuxdevcenter.com: LILO (Linux Loader) and GRUB (GRand Unified Bootloader) are both configured as a primary boot loader (installed on the MBR) or secondary boot loader (installed onto a bootable partition). Both work with supporting operating systems such as Linux, FreeBSD, Net BSD, and OpenBSD.

Also: How to boot with grub off a floppy and into your hard drive

CLI Magic: Use ANSI escape sequences to display a clock in your terminal

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HowTos

linux.com: When I'm in a Linux terminal, I often find myself typing date just to see the time. To make life a bit easier, I wrote a script to always display a clock in the top right corner of the screen.

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Games for GNU/Linux