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HowTos

Run any GNU/Linux app on Windows without any virtualization

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HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: SSH tools, long used by UNIX gurus to perform complicated administrative tasks over the internet on machines miles away, are a very simple and user-friendly solution for more conventional purposes. Ubuntu users, read on to learn how to use SSH to run your favorite GNU/Linux software on Microsoft Windows—without installing any software on the Windows box.

Yet another way to install Ubuntu 7.10 to ASUS Eee PC

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samiux.wordpress: I installed Ubuntu 7.10 SE (my remastered Ubuntu) on a Transcend 8GB Class 6 SDHC card with a no hard drive desktop computer as usual. My desktop is using mobile rack and it is very easy to remove the hard drive.

Use open source to build your own top-class online presence for nothing, part one

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iTWire: Ok, not really nothing: it’ll cost you $9.99 for a domain name. But once you’ve got that, here’s how to build a dynamic and high-class online presence with free web hosting and the powerful open source blogging and content management system WordPress.

Inkscape and Gimp: Tracing a Cartoon Figure

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penguin pete: This isn't really an Earth-shattering technique, but I've lucked out with it enough times to warrant a tutorial. It actually fits with the popular art-school methods for drawing a figure on paper, especially for drawing superhero-type figures.

KDE4 or Bust! — Building KDE4

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nosrednaekim.wordpress: With the release of a (somewhat) stable KDE4 Beta4, I have decided to switch from KDE3.5.8 to KDE4. I decided to compile from source following the excellent instructions on the Techbase.

Save the output of a command in a logfile

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nixcraft: You can use logsave command to save the output of a command in a logfile. General syntax is as follows: logsave /path/to/logfile command-name argument(s)

Howto make partition changes visible to the kernel without reboot

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debianadmin.com: Many system administrators may be in the habit of re-booting their systems to make partition changes visible to the kernel. With Linux, this is not usually necessary. The partprobe command, from the parted package, informs the kernel about changes to partitions.

RHEL / CentOS Support 4GB or more RAM ( memory )

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nixcraft: If you have 4 GB or more RAM use the Linux kernel compiled for PAE capable machines. Your machine may not show up total 4GB ram. All you have to do is install PAE kernel package.

A new look at fonts in Ubuntu

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ubuntu-assist.com: I’ve been playing around with fonts in Gutsy recently, so I thought I would document on this blog.

Fedora 8 Installation Guide

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my-guides.net: Fedora 8 (Werewolf) has been released! Just like Fedora Core 6 and Fedora 7 I wrote this guide to help you with some common installation tasks that might be useful for you. Everything has been tested on my system and it works! Learn how to set up extra repositories, add video/dvd and audio codecs, install useful applications, configure Firefox's plugins, install compiz-fusion and much more!

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