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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • 10 Steps to Convert a Windows User to Linux

  • Creating a shared home partition between Mac OS X and Linux
  • Linux Tip No. 18: Restart Network Service
  • Configuring Xen HA with Heartbeat for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
  • Dawn of War on Linux (How-to guide)
  • KDE-Improve Your Lock Screen Button!

few more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Free POP3 and SMTP Access to Yahoo! Mail with YPOPs! v0.9.5.1

  • Python: Manipulate Date and Time Variables
  • firefox trick and recovery help
  • HowTo Boot an ISO From the Local HDD Using the Current GRUB
  • Converting PDFs into Image Files
  • Using ndiswrapper in Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon to configure Atheros AR5006EG
  • How to Performance Test a Heron
  • Got my wireless working in Linux 2.6.24
  • Installing VirtualBox On Slackware

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Howto: Setup a Software Firewall in Linux using Firestarter

  • Install Firefox 3 Beta 3 on Ubuntu 7.10
  • Change GTK style in KDE 4 with Gtk-kde4
  • How to setup SAMBA for UBUNTU 7.10
  • Install Compiz & Compiz Fusion plugins
  • Mounting Gmail with gmailfs on Ubuntu 7.10, without being root

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Open RAR Archives in Ubuntu

  • FileZilla - FTP Client Software
  • Backing up my laptop
  • Using MySQL as a filesystem
  • Install firefox 3 beta 3 on ubuntu
  • Encrypting and decrypting files with GnuPG

Discover the possibilities of the /proc folder

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HowTos

linux.com: The /proc directory is a strange beast. It doesn't really exist, yet you can explore it. Its zero-length files are neither binary nor text, yet you can examine and display them. By studying the /proc directory, you can learn how Linux commands work, and you can even do some administrative tasks.

How To Configure Remote Access To Your Ubuntu Desktop

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can enable a remote desktop on an Ubuntu desktop so that you can access and control it remotely.

some more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Howto: Screen

  • Resizing the slides in OpenOffice Impress Handouts
  • Linux Tip No. 17: Enable/Disable interface
  • Gnome Panel Font Color Part Deux
  • How to Install Vector Linux 5.9 Gold
  • How to use shared object rules in Snort
  • Installing and Configuring GNUMP3d, The Streaming MP3/OGG Server
  • A Shortcut for Creating Shortcuts
  • How to Gain Root Access
  • Setting up mod_rewrite in Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibon
  • Quick’n'dirty undelete pictures from memory card howto
  • Increase PHP memory limit

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • Mldonkey and conky

  • fast installation of apc php optimizer/cache on Debian / Ubuntu
  • Connect from Linux machine to VPN with proprietary Windows Client
  • Format of /etc/fstab file in Linux
  • Getting Java working on Ubuntu 8.04 Development Branch

some more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Scripting Scribus

  • Make Your Extensions Work with the Firefox 3 Beta
  • Installing Opera 9.25 on RHEL 4
  • Viewing CHM files in Linux
  • ThinkPad X61 Tablet Automatic Screen Rotation Under Linux
  • 10 Things You Should Secure on Your Linux Server
  • Changing Gnome Panel Font Color
  • linux commands

some howtos

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HowTos
  • Mount Network File systems (NFS,Samba) in Ubuntu

  • Installing Adobe Flash Player in Ubuntu
  • Sysvconfig: How not to go postal over a service
  • Meet the Anti-Nmap: PSAD
  • Pimp your Blogspot
  • Browse Anonymously In Thirty Seconds and Three Easy Steps in Ubuntu
  • Joining an Active Directory domain with Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?

Development News

  • Dart-on-LLVM
    Dart already has an excellent virtual machine which uses just-in-time compilation to get excellent performance. Since Dart is dynamically typed (more precisely, it’s optionally typed), a JIT compiler is a natural fit — it can use the types available at runtime to perform optimizations that a static compiler can’t do.
  • Google Developers Experiment With Plumbing Dartlang Into LLVM
    It's been a while since last hearing much excitement around Google's Dart programming language that's an alternative to JavaScript. This ECMA-approved language is now being used with IoT devices, can still be source-to-source compiled for JavaScript, and the latest is that the Google developers have been experimenting with wiring it into LLVM.
  • A behind the scenes look at Exercism for improving coding skills
    In our recent article, we talked about Exercism, an open source project to help people level up in their programming skills with exercises for dozens of different programming languages. Practitioners complete each exercise and then receive feedback on their response, enabling them to learn from their peer group's experience. Katrina Owen is the founder of Exercism, and I interviewed her as research for the original article. There are some fantastic nuggets of information and insight in here that we wanted to share with anyone interested in learning to programming, teaching programming, and how a project like this takes contributions like this from others.
  • ‘You are Not Expected to Understand This’: An Explainer on Unix’s Most Notorious Code Comment
    The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix. And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.