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HowTos

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • Howto: GnuPG

  • How to Change your Computer Name in (K)Ubuntu
  • Taking a Look At Expect on Linux and Unix

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HowTo install memcached from sources on Linux

  • Set up wireless broadband access with YaST
  • Stop Ubuntu / Debian Linux From Deleting /tmp Files on Boot
  • Don’t Let GNOME’s Text Editor Leave Hidden Files
  • How To Redesign Your GNOME Desktop The ‘WOW’ Way
  • Securing OpenSSH Server [Part 1]
  • How to Recover from a Linux Hang

some howtos & such

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HowTos
  • How To Increase The Speed Of Your Firefox Browser

  • Ubuntu Howto: How To Bypass The Trash And Delete A File Completely
  • Monitor a MySQL Server with mytop
  • How to make Jabber calls using Jabbin
  • GPRS in Debian GNU/Linux with mobile phone Siemens ME45
  • Using GNU screen's multiuser feature for remote support
  • Using Shred to Wipe Hard Drives - DoD Uses It - You Should Too!
  • Simple Linux and Unix Password Cracker Shell Script
  • Use virtual keyboards to support international Linux systems

How to Check the Health of a Unix/Linux Server

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HowTos

eWeek: Everybody knows that regular automobile maintenance improves a car's reliability, improves mileage and extends the life of the vehicle. Neal Nelson, president of Neal Nelson & Associates explains that the same is true of computer systems.

howtos & such

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HowTos
  • Working Productively in Bash’s Vi Command Line Editing Mode

  • python user define sorting with callback
  • Theming Firefox 2 For GTK-Like Tabs
  • bash and time calculation
  • Installing IE6 on Ubuntu Gutsy (7.10)
  • Avoid Detection with nmap Port Scan Decoys
  • How to keep your keyboard layout with HAL 0.5.10 / Xorg server 1.4 / evdev input driver
  • keymap mess up on gentoo
  • Rescue Mode
  • My Linux froze and I am hot under the collar
  • Make OS2008 for N800/N810 Look Beautiful
  • Safely Remove Old Linux Kernel from a Linux Server

CLI Magic: Viewing system information

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HowTos

linux.com: GNU/Linux is bursting with information about the system on which it runs. The system's hardware and memory, its Internet link and current processes, the latest activity of each user -- all this information and more is available.

more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Exploring /bin - Part 1 - Cat through Expr

  • create a clustered virtual service for my Xen guest using system-config-cluster
  • Use OpenNTPD for time synchronization
  • Sync your iPhone with Ubuntu Linux
  • Getting 800×480 on the EeePC
  • Toggle Desktop Effects with Compiz-Switch
  • Filelight - a KDE disk usage tool
  • Fix the Boot and Shut Down Screens on Ubuntu

some howtos

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HowTos
  • Xbox media centre on a linux PC

  • Turn Your WRT54GL Into a Wireless Gaming Adapter
  • Installing Drupal Themes
  • Deleted file recovery on unix
  • Startup Manager: configuring grub and usplash
  • Installing Ubuntu on an External Hard Drive

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HowTo Beautifulize the Boot Screen with Grub-GFXBoot

  • sysvconfig - utility for configuring init script links
  • How to install Postal 2 Fudge pack on Debian/Ubuntu
  • Listen Internet Shoutcast and Icecast Radio With BMPx Media Player
  • How to connect to Reliance Internet in Linux using RIM LG / Nokia / Samsung CDMA mobile phone and USB data card/stick ?
  • PyTube: Download and Convert YouTube Videos to Various Formats

KDE 4 preview on Ubuntu

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KDE
HowTos

tectonic: If you’re eagerly awaiting the release of KDE 4.0 on January 11 and you’re running Ubuntu then get a taste of the next big thing by installing KDE 4.0 release candidate 2 in three easy steps.

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  • Why the Open Source Cloud Is Important
    To this end, foundations such as the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and Open Container Initiative (OCI) at The Linux Foundation are actively bringing in new open source projects and engaging member companies to create industry standards for new cloud-native technologies. The goal is to help improve interoperability and create a stable base for container operations on which companies can safely build commercial dependencies.
  • AI Platforms Welcome Devs With Open Arms
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  • The Linux Foundation Seeks Technical and Business Speakers for Open Networking Summit 2017
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    Administering standardized tests online is trickier than it sounds. Underneath the facade of simple multiple choice forms, any workable platform needs a complex web of features to ensure that databases don’t buckle under the pressure of tens of thousands of test takers at once. On top of that, it also needs to ensure that responses are scored correctly and that it’s impossible for students to cheat.
  • LLVM 4.0 Planned For Release At End Of February, Will Move To New Versioning Scheme
    Hans Wennborg has laid out plans to release the LLVM 4.0 (and Clang 4.0, along with other LLVM sub-projects) toward the end of February. The proposal by continuing LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg puts the 4.0 branching followed by RC1 at 12 January, RC2 at 1 February, and the official release around 21 February.

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