Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

HowTos

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Stop Wine From Beating Your Windows Apps With The Ugly Stick

  • How To: Editing HD Video in Linux
  • Using and Understanding the Unix Date Command
  • Sorting Photos
  • Graphical disk usage with Baobab
  • HowTo install Avant Window Navigator (AWN) in Ubuntu 7.10
  • Nmap for Beginners - Network & Port Scanning made easy

HOW TO: Mandriva 2008 on HP dv6000

Filed under
HowTos

forum.mandriva.com: I had a somewhat difficult time getting Mandriva 2008 to work on my HP dv6113us, and given the lack of posts regarding this particular laptop series (despite its popularity), I figured I'd document what steps I took to get a FULLY FUNCTIONING Mandriva install.

Installing Linux Mint - Full tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: If you are a beginner Linux user looking for a simple, friendly distribution, you might want to look at Linux Mint. In this article, I'll demonstrate the classic GUI installation, but also a few things more. It should not be boring.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Easy and safe bash history searches

  • Copy Set of Files to All Users Home Directory
  • Speeding up Ubuntu installations
  • Nautilus-Flac-Converter: Convert Flac to Ogg from Nautilus

Building A Linux Music Studio Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

LinuxPlanet: Last week we made a music CD from a live digital recording the easy and simple way. Today we're going to fix volume levels and do graceful fades and transitions using Audacity and normalize.

Securing Joomla! installations

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Joomla! is a well-known content management system, mature enough to be used by thousands of amateur and professional Web portals. Installation is a breeze and consists of six click-next steps. However, a default Joomla! installation is not necessarily a secure one, so let's see how we can protect our portal from potential attackers.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • personal Ubuntu speed up tweak guide
  • How to find your UUID’s for devices in Ubuntu
  • FTP Server setup with TLS (Transport Layer Security) on Debian
  • Setting the default fonts for OpenOffice Writer
  • Tips for successful Kernel Recompilation in Linux
  • Bullet proof your server #2 - SSH
  • ISO Master: CD Image Editor for Linux
  • Howto Setup iTunes-compatible Media server in Ubuntu

How to Replace Ubuntu’s Default Brown Login Window

Filed under
HowTos

tombuntu.com: When you customized your Ubuntu desktop to replace the brown theme, you may have overlooked the login window. GNOME’s login window, called GDM (GNOME Display Manager), can be easily customized by installing themes.

Quick Linux Tip of the Day: Auto Kill

Filed under
HowTos

raiden's realm: Ever had something you wanted to leave running on your system, but needed to have it automatically shutdown at a certain time, yet it has no ability to do that on its own? Enter the "auto kill" trick.

even more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Start KControl on Kubuntu

  • Enterprise streaming media? Sure, and on virtual Linux systems!
  • Make Your Own Passport Size Photos (using GIMP)
  • Adding A Dynamic Desktop To Your Ubuntu
  • TPT(Tiny Python Tip): Python for Bash Scripters
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Open spec SBC dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

T-Firefly is Kickstartering the first hacker SBC with Rockchip’s Cortex-A72/-A53 RK3399. The Firefly-RK3399 has up to 4GB DDR3, M.2, and USB 3.0 Type-C. T-Firefly, which offers Linux- and Android-ready open source boards like the Firefly-RK3288 and sandwich-style Firefly-RK3288 Reload, both of which are based on the quad-core, Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288, has advanced to a more powerful Rockchip SoC for its new open spec Firefly-RK3399. The hexa-core Rockchip RK3399 features two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz. This appears to be the first RK3399 SBC and the first SBC to include Cortex-A72 cores. Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • Manuskript is a Promising Open-Source Scrivener Alternative
    Whether you plan to work on a book, a screenplay, or better structure your dissertation, you’ll probably see apps like Scrivener recommended. If you’re running Windows, macOS or even Android then you’re spoilt for choice, with various competing proprietary apps at varying price points readily available. On Linux the choices are somewhat limited.
  • Tor 0.2.9 Is Just Around the Corner As 0.2.8.10 Fixes Memory Leak in OpenSSL 1.1
    The past weekend brought us new stable and development builds of the Tor anonymity network project, versioned 0.2.8.10, as the most advanced version out there, and 0.2.9.6 RC (Release Candidate).
  • Pitivi 0.98 Linux Video Editor Adds Customizable Keyboard Shortcuts
    Version 0.98 of the GNOME-aligned GStreamer-powered Pitivi non-linear video editor was tagged today as the newest development milestone. The main feature addition of Pitivi 0.98 is now supporting customizable keyboard supports! Aside from finally supporting customizable keyboard shortcuts for this open-source video editor, a lot of warnings were fixed from GTK 3.22, and there has been a lot of other bug fixing. Bugs around Pitivi's timeline were primarily targeted by this release.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.8-Tana Officially Released
    Phoronix Test Suite 6.8.0 is now available as the latest version of our open-source, fully-automated, reproducible benchmarking software for Linux, BSD, Solaris, macOS, Windows, and other operating systems. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 is the latest stable release now of our GPL-licensed benchmarking software updated on its regular quarterly release cadence. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 development focused on a number of low-level improvements to particularly benefit Phoromatic and the Phodevi (Phoronix Device Interface) software/hardware library abstraction layer.
  • iPerf As Another Network Benchmark Is Now Available Via The Phoronix Test Suite
  • Chromium-Based Vivaldi 1.6 Browser Enters Development, Brings Tab Stack Renaming
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard informs us about the availability of a new snapshot for the cross-platform, Chromium-based Vivaldi web browser, which promises to let users name tab stacks. Vivaldi Snapshot 1.6.682.3 marks the beginning of the development of Vivaldi 1.6, the next major version of the popular web browser, and it looks like it has been rebased on Chromium 55.0.2883.64. Besides fixing a bunch of regressions, the new development release implements an option under Settings -> Tabs -> Tab Features -> Tab stacking -> Allow Tab Stack Renaming, which lets you rename or name tab stacks.

today's howtos