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HowTos

How to: Installing and running Ubuntu on the Eee PC

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HowTos

arstechnica.com: When the Asus Eee PC came out last year, we found that the eeextremely eeenticing subnotebook had the potential to be a real game-changer. Indeed, the diminutive wonder has spawned countless imitation products from a wide range of other vendors.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How To Find BASH Shell Array Length

  • Setting up mpd locally
  • Keyboard Shortcut Keys in Ubuntu
  • Gmrun - Substitute for gnome run dialog in Ubuntu
  • VirtualBox Wireless Bridging
  • Getting VirtualBox working on Ubuntu after a kernel upgrade
  • Automated scanning with the shell
  • Automatically mount a windows share at boot time in OpenSuse 11
  • Taking Screenshots in Gnome
  • HOWTO: PCLOS custom session
  • Customize Compiz Fusion effects In Ubuntu
  • Compiz Fusion in openSUSE 11.0

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On Fedora 9

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This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota and upload/download bandwidth limits with this setup. Passwords will be stored encrypted as MD5 strings in the database.

How To Move Linux to a New Hard Drive

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HowTos

penguinpetes.com: It's been a busy week for me. It's been one of those weeks where all the machines in the house gang up on me and demand attention at once. One of the computers ran out of hard drive space. So I had a bigger hard drive with four times the disk space handy, and swapped them. The steps:

few more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Ubuntu / Vista dual boot installation on a Sony VGN-FZ

  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 5, Part 6
  • Setup ATI Graphics with AIGLX Rendering in openSUSE 11.0 for Compiz
  • Setup Intel Graphics card with AIGLX Rendering for Compiz-Fusion
  • Setup nVidia Graphics card with AIGLX rendering for openSUSE 11.0

few other howtos:

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HowTos
  • RPMing the night away!

  • How to make QT applications look better in GNOME
  • How To Tell If An Application Is 64-bit In Ubuntu Hardy Heron

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • GIMP Tricks: Fake Fill Flash

  • Create video animations with Inkscape, ImageMagick and FFmpeg
  • Apt and Dpkg Tips

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HOW-TO enable read/write in FAT partition after error

  • Howto: Use xplanet for a desktop weather map
  • How To Harden Your Linux Server (Debian / Ubuntu)
  • Gentoo Prefix: PORTAGE_TMPDIR on NFS solution
  • Install “ubuntu netboot remix” menu in hardy heron
  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 5
  • Performance Tuning Best Practices for MySQL
  • debian: building custom exim packages
  • Lenovo ThinkPad X61t Touch support
  • Dpkg Cheat Sheet
  • The Sort Command
  • Upgrade to the Latest Compiz Fusion Release
  • -A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p 50 -j ACCEPT
  • Bash scripting Tutorial
  • Getting that wiki feeling on the desktop, part 3

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 3, Part 4

  • Howto: build and install the intl PECL extension for PHP5 in Debian
  • How to change the default timeout before default OS boots in grub
  • Using Adobe Flash and other 32-bit applications on 64-bit Linux
  • Guake Drop-Down Terminal for GNOME
  • How to install the Web 2.0 i686 Flock Web Browser on 64-bit Gentoo Linux…
  • Installing Fonts Using Synaptic In Ubuntu Hardy Heron

10 ways to make Linux boot faster

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HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Linux rarely needs to be rebooted. But when it does, it’s often slow to boot. Fortunately, there are ways to speed things up. Some of these methods are not terribly difficult. (although some, unfortunately, are). Let’s take a look.

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More in Tux Machines

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.

Servers: Microservice, Clear Linux/Containers, Spaceborne Computer

  • Microservice architecture takes a whole new approach to infrastructure
    With services like Netflix, Uber, YouTube, and Facebook, most people are used to apps that respond quickly, work efficiently, and are updated regularly. Patience is no longer a virtue, and thanks to apps like the ones mentioned above, when people use applications, they expect blistering speeds and uninterrupted service. If you do not provide that, users aren’t exactly starved for choice; it takes less than a minute to delete an app and download something else as a replacement.
  • Clear Linux Project Announces the Next Generation of Intel's Clear Containers
    Intel's Clear Linux and Clear Containers teams are happy to introduce the next-generation of Intel's Clear Containers project, version 3.0, which bring many important new features and performance improvements. Rewritten in the Go language, Intel Clear Containers 3.0 introduces support for leveraging code used for namespace-based containers and better integrates into the container ecosystem, allowing support for Docker container engine and Kubernetes. It also improves the compatibility with the POSIX family of standards. "Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment," said Amy L Leeland, Technical Program Manager, Intel Corporation.
  • “Spaceborne” Linux Supercomputer Starts Running In Space, Achieves 1 Teraflop Speed
    About one month ago, the HPE’s Spaceborne Computer was launched into the space using SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft. This beast was launched as a result of a partnership between Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA to find out how high-performance computers perform in space. Now, this supercomputer is fully installed and operational in ISS. The performance experiment will be carried out for one year, which is roughly the time it will take for a spacecraft to travel to Mars. At the moment, lots of calculations for space research projects are carried out on Earth, but this brings in an unavoidable factor of latency.

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more