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HowTos

Things that control how content is displayed in OpenOffice.org Calc spreadsheets

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OOo
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Tips: If you spend all day in spreadsheets, sooner or later you want something to help you spot what's important or different. The motion study expert Frank Gilbreth told factories to paint parts different colors to help factory workers spot the right pieces more quickly; Calc has roughly equivalent features to help point out the different types of data you're working with.

HOW TO: Setup a Web-based BitTorrent Client

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HowTos

wolphination.com: How many times have you been stuck at work when the latest episode of a podcast such as LugRadio has become available for download, or the latest version of your favourite Linux distribution has been released? Wouldn’t it be really useful if you could access a server at home through your web browser and order it to download that file, so that it’s waiting for you when you get there?

Civilization IV on Linux, Updated How-to

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HowTos

tombuntu: This is the second edition of my Civilization IV (Civ 4) on Linux how-to. With this guide you can run Civ 4 almost flawlessly on Ubuntu or any other Linux distribution using Wine.

Share a Firefox Profile Between Ubuntu and Windows

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HowTos

cybernet: One of the new things in Ubuntu 7.10 is the ability to read and write to NTFS formatted drives, which is great for Windows XP and Vista users. What that means is that you can create a Firefox profile in Windows and set it up so that Ubuntu uses the exact same profile.

Howto : Make Flash Player 9 Work In Full Screen Mode

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HowTos

tuxicity.wordpress: On most distros the Stable version of Flash: 9.0.48.0 is available. To get Flash Player 9 to work in full screen mod mode you need Flash, build 9.0.64.0 , a prerelease of the next version of Flash. To get the prerelease of Flash you need to go to adobe.labs.com.

ATI 8.43.3 on openSUSE - the hard way

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HowTos

CyberOrg: Much awaited ATI 8.43.3 drivers are finally available. Here is what you need to do to get them working on openSUSE 10.3. Step 1. Get all requirements:

Add a directory to your PATH

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HowTos

/dev/loki: As it's a recurring question, here is how to add one or more directories to your PATH (on openSUSE, but applies more or less to other distributions as well). Note that I assume you're using bash as your shell.

Building a custom kernel in Freebsd

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BSD
HowTos

Raiden's Realm: If you've run Freebsd for a while, you're likely by now interested in streamlining its operation a bit by building a custom kernel. While a generic kernel allows for easier portability of your install should something happen to the hardware, a custom kernel allows you greater speed by removing unnecessary configurations and options from the kernel.

Basic Linux Tips and Tricks, Part 3

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HowTos

Linux Planet: Part 1 of this article provided the general background a reader needs to solve problems with Linux. Part 2 of this article discussed the process of solving Linux problems. In this final part of a three-part series, we'll step through a real-world example of solving a Linux problem.

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Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software

Pithos 1.2

  • New Version of Linux Pandora Client ‘Pithos’ Released
    A new release of open-source Linux Pandora client Pithos is now available for download.
  • Pithos 1.2 Improves The Open-Source/Linux Pandora Desktop Experience
    Chances are if you've ever dealt with Pandora music streaming from the Linux desktop you've encountered Pithos as the main open-source solution that works out quite well. Released today was Pithos 1.2 and it ships with numerous enhancements for this GPLv3-licensed Pandora desktop client. Pithos 1.2 adds a number of new keyboard shortcuts for the main window, initial support for translations, an explicit content filter option, reduced CPU usage with Ubuntu's default theme, redesigned dialogs and other UI elements, and more.