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HowTos

Three Methods for Tunneling your Connections

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HowTos

tipoftheday: Sometimes, you just need to break through a troublesome gateway. Or perhaps you need to test a connection from a remote location. If you’re like most geeks, though, there’s already ample reason to do any of this — because you can.

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • Ubuntu Guide For Windows Users: How To Play MP3 Audio Files

  • Configuring Airtel Beetel 220BX in Ubuntu
  • HTTrack: Website crawler / copier

few howtos and a short

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HowTos
  • Miss Your Windows Application? Try WINE

  • Installing Skype 2 Beta on Kubuntu
  • Encrypting your /home
  • Install Mplayer and Multimedia Codecs (libdvdcss2,w32codecs) in Ubuntu 7.10
  • Snowglobe, shelf plugins in compiz-fusion-git

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • VMWare Server Tip: Display Menus and Toolbars in Quick Switch Mode

  • Howto: XDM
  • Customize Firefox blank page
  • SSH Key Authentication Using seahorse (GUI)
  • Read Your Linux Partition from Windows with DiskInternals Linux Reader
  • XGL and Xen can mix on a T61p!
  • Quick Tip: Rotating Background per Time of Day in KDE

Setting Up ProFTPd + TLS On Debian Etch

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HowTos

FTP is a very insecure protocol because all passwords and all data are transferred in clear text. By using TLS, the whole communication can be encrypted, thus making FTP much more secure. This article explains how to set up ProFTPd with TLS on a Debian Etch server.

some howtos and stuff

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HowTos
  • Running Windows inside your Ubuntu 7.10 installation

  • Create a Virtual Monitor Power Button
  • How To Install Tilda 0.9.5 on Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon
  • Linux / UNIX dot-files
  • EasyCrypt - a simple GUI for TrueCrypt
  • Kompozer is easy and free
  • apturl - protocol handler in Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon

Samba Domaincontroller For Small Workgroups With SWAT On Fedora 8

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HowTos

This document describes how to set up and configure a Samba Domaincontroller for small workgroups (up to 250 users) on Fedora 8 with the Samba Web Administration Tool.

more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Installing gOS on Ubuntu

  • Simple File Encryption with OpenSSL
  • Configure Linux
  • APT-Get vs Aptitude - Command Line Reference Guide
  • OpenOffice.org Calc: Basic arithmetic and statistic functions

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Creating simple charts with Gambas 2.0

  • How to install MySQL on Ubuntu/Debian
  • Ubuntu / Debian Linux: Services Configuration Tool to Start / Stop System Services
  • Vista and Ubuntu double system
  • Ubuntu NVIDIA Compiz Black Window Bug Fix
  • Swapping control and caps keys in linux

some more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Encrypt your /home this Christmas: part three

  • Tech Tip: Keyword Search in Firefox
  • A Couple of GDB Tricks
  • How to edit your GRUB settings with QGRUBEditor
  • Mounting Samba Shares
  • Yet another guide for Compiz - ATI - Ubuntu Gutsy
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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • 7 Things to do After Installing KDE Plasma
    Even for other Linux users, KDE Plasma can seem like a different operating system. Except for a few standards like LibreOffice, the apps are different, and so is the design philosophy, which tends to cram in every possible feature. As a result, once they install, users are likely to wonder what to do next.
  • KDE Framworks 5 Content Snap Techno
    In the previous post on Snapping KDE Applications we looked at the high-level implication and use of the KDE Frameworks 5 content snap to snapcraft snap bundles for binary distribution. Today I want to get a bit more technical and look at the actual building and inner workings of the content snap itself. The KDE Frameworks 5 snap is a content snap. Content snaps are really just ordinary snaps that define a content interface. Namely, they expose part or all of their file tree for use by another snap but otherwise can be regular snaps and have their own applications etc. KDE Frameworks 5’s snap is special in terms of size and scope. The whole set of KDE Frameworks 5, combined with Qt 5, combined with a large chunk of the graphic stack that is not part of the ubuntu-core snap. All in all just for the Qt5 and KF5 parts we are talking about close to 100 distinct source tarballs that need building to compose the full frameworks stack. KDE is in the fortunate position of already having builds of all these available through KDE neon. This allows us to simply repack existing work into the content snap. This is for the most part just as good as doing everything from scratch, but has the advantage of saving both maintenance effort and build resources.
  • Calligra 3.0 Is Ready As A Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 Office Suite
    It's been quite a while since last having anything to report on the KDE Calligra open-source graphics/office suite while surprisingly this morning it was pleasant to see Calligra 3.0 tagged for release.
  • KDE Applications 16.12 Up to Release Candidate State, Final Arrives December 15
    The KDE development team was proud to announce the availability of the Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment. Work on KDE Applications 16.12 started about a month ago, on November 10, when the third and last maintenance update of the current stable KDE Applications 16.08 release was announced, marking the end of life of the series. Until today, KDE Applications 16.12 received a Beta development version, tagged as build 16.11.80, and now we're seeing the Release Candidate, tagged as build 16.11.90.

64-bit Raspberry Image and OpenStack at SUSE

  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 gets 64-bit Raspberry Image
    The latest release from openSUSE has new images available for the Raspberry Pi and joins SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi in becoming the initial distributions with 64-bit for the Raspberry Pi 3. The 64-bit image of openSUSE Leap 42.2 for the Raspberry Pi 3 has been out for a couple weeks. “The ARM and AArch64 Images for openSUSE Leap 42.2 are not a once-only release,” said Dirk Mueller. “They get continuously updated and include fixes as the Leap 42.2 port matures over time. These are the first usable images, and more variants with more fixes will come over time.”
  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Does A 64-bit Spin For The Raspberry Pi 3
    Following SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as being available in a 64-bit edition catered to the Raspberry Pi 3, openSUSE developers have now released a 64-bit image of Leap 42.2 for the RPi3.
  • http://ostatic.com/blog/suse-buys-hpes-openstack-and-cloud-foundry-assets-talent
    Back in November, the Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of an industry-standard platform for cloud applications, announced that SUSE had increased its engagement and support of Cloud Foundry by becoming a Platinum member. Now, SUSE has entered into an agreement with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to acquire technology and talent that will expand SUSE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. In addition, the company announced that it will accelerate its entry into the growing Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) market, and said that the acquired OpenStack assets will be integrated into SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

Pico-ITX SBC runs Ubuntu on Braswell

DFI announced an Intel Braswell based “BW051” Pico-ITX SBC with up to 8GB DDR3L, mini-PCIe, SATA 3.0, mSATA, and Linux support. DFI, which earlier this year tapped Intel’s “Braswell” generation of SoCs for its BW968 COM Express Compact Type 6 module, has now chosen Braswell for a Pico-ITX SBC. The 100 x 72mm BW051 ships with 4-6W Braswell processors including dual or quad-core Celeron models, the quad-core 1.6GHz Pentium N3710, and quad-core, 1.04GHz Atom x5-E8000. Read more

Shuttleworth Foundation/Mozilla Foundation Overlap

  • Helen Turvey Joins the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors
    Today, we’re welcoming Helen Turvey as a new member of the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors. Helen is the CEO of the Shuttleworth Foundation. Her focus on philanthropy and openness throughout her career makes her a great addition to our Board. Throughout 2016, we have been focused on board development for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation boards of directors. Our recruiting efforts for board members has been geared towards building a diverse group of people who embody the values and mission that bring Mozilla to life. After extensive conversations, it is clear that Helen brings the experience, expertise and approach that we seek for the Mozilla Foundation Board.
  • Why I’m joining Mozilla’s Board, by Helen Turvey
    For the last decade I have run the Shuttleworth Foundation, a philanthropic organisation that looks to drive change through open models. The FOSS movement has created widely used software and million dollar businesses, using collaborative development approaches and open licences. This model is well established for software, it is not the case for education, philanthropy, hardware or social development.