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HowTos

Some Howtos

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HowTos
  • All your apt cache belongs to us!

  • Setting time the right way, the Linux way
  • Different Ways of Taking Screenshots in Nokia N800
  • How to Trigger Xchat from Firefox
  • Saving Bandwidth With Apt-Cacher : Revisited
  • Restart Apache Server without affecting existing connections

Opera Tips & Tricks

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HowTos

cybernet: Opera is an extremely customizable browser, but it does so much that it can be difficult to remember it all. Then again you would have to know what it does in order to remember it. Smile Today we want to walk you through a dozen tips and tricks that will inch you closer to becoming an Opera grand master.

Tales from responsivenessland: why Linux feels slow, and how to fix that

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HowTos

Rudd-O: Desktop performance on Linux computers has been a hot-button issue of late, and a source of longstanding fights among the Linux developers. Today, I want to show you how I boosted (and you can boost) desktop performance dramatically.

some howtos

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HowTos
  • How to open files as root via a right click

  • How To Boot Mandriva on a USB Disk
  • Sha-1 Checksum
  • Access Google Calendar From Linux / UNIX / Mac OS X Command Line Interface
  • Backing up and restoring your DSL configuration
  • Howto Install Freecom Musicpal in Ubuntu Feisty
  • How To Install VMware Tools on Ubuntu Guests
  • Howto Fix RSSOwl Internal Browser

How To Set Up VMware Tools On Various Linux Distributions

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Linux
PCLOS
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document explains how to set up the VMware Tools in the following guest operating systems: Ubuntu 7.04, Fedora 7, PCLinuxOS 2007 and Debian Etch. Installing VMware Tools in your guest operating systems will help maximize performance, provide mouse synchronization and copy & paste functionality.

Using FileZilla on Linux

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HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently, the open source FileZilla FTP client became available for Mac OS X and Linux. Using the wxWidgets cross-platform user interface, FileZilla now can be used with a consistent look-and-feel on multiple operating systems.

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

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HowTos

Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • PyMOTW: copy

  • HeX: Full Screen Terminal
  • Howto make Ubuntu to read feeds for you
  • Fixing the Ubuntu Gutsy boot splash issue

Preventing Brute Force Attacks With BlockHosts On Debian Etch

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HowTos

In this article I will show how to install and configure BlockHosts on a Debian Etch system. BlockHosts is a Python tool that observes login attempts to various services, e.g. SSH, FTP, etc., and if it finds failed login attempts again and again from the same IP address or host, it stops further login attempts from that IP address/host.

Mysql Command Lines

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HowTos

Linux By Example: You extract info from mysql databases easily by execute the command line mysql -e. The results of sql statements can be save into various format of files, such as plain text without ascii table borders (batch mode), html (with table tags, such as td,tr,th) and XML.

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    AMD and Intel released the first 64-bit CPUs for consumers back in 2003 and 2004. Now, more than a decade later, Linux distributions are looking at winding down support for 32-bit hardware. Google already took this leap back in 2015, dumping 32-bit versions of Chrome for Linux.
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    The Linux Mint 18 milestone release is the first major update for the popular desktop Linux distribution in 2016 and follows the Linux Mint 17.3 update that debuted in December 2015. Linux Mint 18 is based on the Ubuntu 16.04 Long Term Support (LTS) Linux distribution released April 21 and, like Ubuntu 16.04, Linux Mint 18 is being supported as an LTS, with support until the year 2021. As was the case with previous Linux Mint distribution updates, there are multiple desktop environment choices. Cinnamon 3.0, which is developed by Linux Mint and typically is the primary deployment choice for users, brings new window tiling capabilities and default effects for window transitions and actions. Additionally, Linux Mint 18 includes a new desktop theme option called Mint-Y that brings newly styled icons to users. In terms of new integrated applications, Linux Mint 18 includes the gufw application, a graphical interface for firewall configuration. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the Linux Mint 18.
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Red Hat and Fedora

today's howtos