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Programming: PureScript, C++, Lua, and Raku

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn PureScript - LinuxLinks

    PureScript is a small strongly, statically typed programming language with expressive types, written in and inspired by Haskell, and compiling to Javascript. It can be used to develop web applications, server side apps, and also desktop applications with use of Electron.

  • C++ Operator Overloading – Linux Hint

    This article provides a guide to operator overloading in C++. Operator overloading is a useful and powerful feature of the C++ programming language. C++ allows overloading of most built-in operators. In this tutorial, we will use several examples to demonstrate the operator overloading mechanism. [...] The C++ language allows programmers to give special meanings to operators. This means that you can redefine the operator for user-defined data types in C++. For example, “+” is used to add built-in data types, such as int, float, etc. To add two types of user-defined data, it is necessary to overload the “+” operator.

  • Lua, a misunderstood language

    Lua is one of my favourite programming languages. I’ve used it to build a CMS for my old educational website, for creating cool IoT hardware projects, for building little games, and experimenting with network decentralisation. Still, I don’t consider myself an expert on it at all, I am at most a somewhat competent user. This is to say that I have had exposure to it in various contexts and through many years but I am not deep into its implementation or ecosystem. Because of that, it kinda pains me when I read blog posts and articles about Lua that appear to completely miss the objective and context of the language. Usually these posts read like a rant or a list of demands. Most recently, I saw a post about Lua’s Lack of Batteries on LWN and a discussion about that post on Hacker News that made me want to write back. In this post I’ll address some of the comments I’ve seen on that original article and on Hacker News.

  • A Complete Course of the Raku programming language

    This course covers all the main aspects of the language that you need to use in your daily practice. The course consists of five parts that explain the theory and offer many practical assignments. It is assumed that you try solving the tasks yourself before looking to the solution.

    If you’re only starting to learn Raku, you are advised to go through all the parts in the order they are listed in the table of contents. If you have some practice and you want to have some specific training, you are welcome to start with the desired section.

Software: Trakt Scrobbler, GIMP, and More

  • Sync mpv, VLC, Plex And MPC-BE/MPC-HC With Trakt.tv Using Trakt Scrobbler

    Trakt Scrobbler is a Trakt.tv scrobbler for Linux, macOS and Windows, which supports VLC, MPV, MPC-BE/MPC-HC and Plex (doesn't require a Plex Pass). The tool is controlled from the command line. After the initial setup, Trakt Scrobbler runs in the background, monitoring what's playing (movies / TV show episodes) in the media players you configure, and sending this information to Trakt.tv. It also displays optional desktop notifications when scrobbling begins and ends

  • [PPA Update] GIMP 2.10.22 with Python Script Support in Ubuntu 18.04

    For Ubuntu 18.04 users sticking to the PPA build of GIMP image editor 2.10.22, now the Python Script support is back. Since old GTK2 and Python 2 libraries being removed from Ubuntu universe repositories, the Python script support was excluded due to lack of dependencies when I was uploading the GIMP packages into PPA. Ubuntu 18.04 was neglected, though. It meets all the dependencies to build the requested feature. So I added it back. Hope it’s not too late for you :). And the package was totally built via the rules from otto-kesselgulasch’s PPA.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Kdenlive 20.12.1, BleachBit 4.2.0 & LibreOffice 7.1 RC - OMG! Ubuntu!

    I’m keen to get back into the habit of posting Linux release roundups. The last one I wrote was way back in 2019 — so it’s been a while! [...] Well, open source and Linux-focused development never stops. App, tool, kernel, driver, distro, and framework updates pop out each and every week. Not all of these updates are what you’d call ‘substantial’ or ‘must-read’ news. Point releases, for instance, are difficult to “pad out” into a full length article (much less sound like one you’d want to read about). I’m loathe to start firing out 8 short posts a day on thin topics. It clogs up your feed reader and pushes genuinely interesting content off the main page. Hence the roundups. I get the satisfaction of being able to cover the “lite” news items I normally skip (and mention distro releases I might not normally be able to), and you get the satisfaction of knowing you’re missing out on even less stuff. Keen to see what meaty chunks are threaded on this week’s skewer? Read on…

Python Programming

  • Indexing and Slicing in Python Tutorial – Linux Hint

    List is considered to be a useful feature of Python. It is handy and can be accessed using the index value of the list. Moreover, it is written inside the squared brackets. In this article, we will illustrate and check these methods of slicing and indexing in Python using Python 3.8 version.

  • Python xrange vs. range – Linux Hint

    Till the Python version 2.x, there were a total of two underlying methods used in this language to generate the list of integers within a provided range. The two methods are listed below: range () xrange () Moving forward, with the latest version of Python (3 onwards), range () was withdrawn, and xrange () was then changed into range (). Now in Python 3, there is only one function for this method, i.e., range (). In Python 3, the range () function is just another way of implementing the older version of xrange() of python 2.x. Here, we will relate the two.

  • Python File Handling – Linux Hint

    In Python, a file is a location on disk used to store information, which some names are associated with it. It is used to store data permanently in a non-volatile (non-volatile means retains data even if power loss) memory (Ex: hard disk).

  • Python Traceback Tutorial
  • Python Closures Tutorial
  • Python Descriptors Tutorial

Audiocasts/Shows: Late Night Linux, Destination Linux and More

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 108

    Will’s questionable network gear recommendations, Wikipedia at 20, terrible BBC educational material, minimising e-waste, VMs vs containers, KDE Korner, and more.

  • Destination Linux 209: The Best Product Doesn’t Always Win

    After last weeks discussion in the after show about Gnome 40 and some of the interface changes being made, we couldn’t help but compare those changes to one of the most beloved operating system of it’s time. In this episode, we’re going to talk about this OS to find out why so many on the show consider it one of the greatest mobile Operating Systems ever. In addition, we’re going to check out some new goals and updates coming to Tails in 2021. Plus we’ve also got our famous tips, tricks and software picks. All of this and so much more this week on Destination Linux.

  • A First Look At Manjaro Sway Edition

    I'm going to do a quick installation and first look at Manjaro Sway Edition. This is an unofficial community spin of Manjaro that features Wayland and the Sway compositor/window manager. Sway is a clone of i3 but designed to work with Wayland rather than X11.

  • Gaming On Linux Is Super Comfy - YouTube

    Towards the start and end of every year, linux blogs and channels make posts discussing the best gaming distro for the following year and I'm here to tell you that you'll never find it because the best linux gaming distro doesn't exist.