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More in Tux Machines

Android automotive system features three displays

Mitsubishi’s “FlexConnect.IVI” automotive system runs Android on a TI Jacinto 6 SoC, and drives IVI, HUD, and cluster displays simultaneously. The trouble with most in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems is that they’re mounted in the center of the dashboard, and therefore not ideally located for the driver. Yet the display also needs to be accessible from the front seat passenger. Mitsubishi Electric’s FlexConnect.IVI system follows the trend of integrating IVI screens with a separate GUI instrument cluster, and also adds a third GUI heads-up display (HUD) display projected against the windshield for greater driver safety. Read more

Fedora 22 Final status is Go, release on May 26, 2015

At the Fedora 22 Final Go/No-Go Meeting #2 that just occurred, it was agreed to Go with the Fedora 22 Final by Fedora QA, Release Engineering and Development. Fedora 22 Final will be publicly available on Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Meeting details can be seen here: Minutes: http://bit.ly/1Bh2pH1 Log: http://bit.ly/1HzMI5g Thank you everyone for a great job, sleepless nights validating TCs, RCs, fixing bugs, composing stuf and everything else needed for smooth releases. Amazing last three years wrangling releases for me! Read more

Malware is not only about viruses – companies preinstall it all the time

In 1983, when I started the free software movement, malware was so rare that each case was shocking and scandalous. Now it’s normal. To be sure, I am not talking about viruses. Malware is the name for a program designed to mistreat its users. Viruses typically are malicious, but software products and software preinstalled in products can also be malicious – and often are, when not free/libre. In 1983, the software field had become dominated by proprietary (ie nonfree) programs, and users were forbidden to change or redistribute them. I developed the GNU operating system, which is often called Linux, to escape and end that injustice. But proprietary developers in the 1980s still had some ethical standards: they sincerely tried to make programs serve their users, even while denying users control over how they would be served. Read more

Tessel 2, A $35 Linux Computer That’s Truly Open Source

We’ve seen the first version of the Tessel a few years ago, and it’s still an interesting board: an ARM Cortex-M3 running at 180MHz, WiFi, 32 Megs of both Flash and RAM, and something that can be programmed entirely in JavaScript or Node.js. Since then, the company behind Tessel, Technical Machines, has started work on the Tessel 2, a board that’s continuing in the long tradition of taking chips from WiFi routers and making a dev board out of them. The Tessel 2 features a MediaTek MT7620 running Linux built on OpenWRT, Ethernet, 802.11bgn WiFi, an Atmel SAMD21 serving as a real-time I/O coprocessor, two USB ports, and everything can still be controlled through JavaScript, Node, with support for Rust and other languages in the works. Read more