Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.34 Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

GNOME 3.34 will be the next major release of the popular free and open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems, expected to hit the streets later this year on September 11th. During its entire development cycle, GNOME 3.34 will be developed under the GNOME 3.33.x umbrella. Work on the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment begun a few weeks ago, after the launch of the GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" desktop environment, which is already the default desktop environment of the recently released Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system and other GNU/Linux distributions. Read more

The mysterious history of the MIT License

I say "seemingly straightforward" because the MIT License is one of the most popular licenses used by open source software. The MIT License, Apache License, and BSD license are the main permissive licenses, a term that contrasts with reciprocal licenses like the GPL, which require source code to be made available when software is redistributed. Given its popularity, you'd think the license's inception would be well-documented. I found various clues that added up to a date in the late 1980s but nothing definitive. However, Keith Packard and Jim Gettys jumped on the thread to offer first-hand accounts of the license's creation. In addition to providing early examples of the license, their help also gave me the context to better understand how the license evolved over time. Read more

BSD: A Look at NomadBSD and Audiocasts About BSDs and ZFS

  • NomadBSD, a BSD for the Road
    As regular It’s FOSS readers should know, I like diving into the world of BSDs. Recently, I came across an interesting BSD that is designed to live on a thumb drive. Let’s take a look at NomadBSD. [...] This German BSD comes with an OpenBox-based desktop with the Plank application dock. NomadBSD makes use of the DSB project. DSB stands for “Desktop Suite (for) (Free)BSD” and consists of a collection of programs designed to create a simple and working environment without needing a ton of dependencies to use one tool. DSB is created by Marcel Kaiser one of the lead devs of NomadBSD. Just like the original BSD projects, you can contact the NomadBSD developers via a mailing list.
  • Fun with funlinkat() | BSD Now 295
    Introducing funlinkat(), an OpenBSD Router with AT&T U-Verse, using NetBSD on a raspberry pi, ZFS encryption is still under development, Rump kernel servers and clients tutorial, Snort on OpenBSD 6.4, and more.
  • Snapshot Sanity | TechSNAP 402
    We continue our take on ZFS as Jim and Wes dive in to snapshots, replication, and the magic on copy on write. Plus some handy tools to manage your snapshots, rsync war stories, and more!

Radeon Developments

  • The Radeon "RADV" Driver Now Exposes Vulkan 1.1 On Android
    While the Mesa-based Radeon "RADV" Vulkan driver has been exposing Vulkan 1.1 since last year, the upcoming Mesa 19.1 will bring support for Vulkan 1.1 when this driver is active on Android systems. While the intersection of RADV driver usage on Android systems is quite low, this RADV Vulkan 1.1 support on Android comes following the merging of the YCbCr support into Mesa Git for the upcoming 19.1 release. Of the many additions to Vulkan 1.1 was YCbCr color formatted textures handling
  • Radeon Software for Linux 19.10 Adds Ubuntu 18.04.2 Support
    Radeon Software for Linux 19.10 was quietly released at the end of last week and seemed to go unnoticed until a Phoronix reader pointed out the existence of this updated hybrid driver featuring the AMDGPU All-Open and AMDGPU-PRO components. While being the first new release stream in quite a while to succeed the 18.50 series, the changes aren't all that noteworthy for what has been made public. The main change of Radeon Software for Linux 19.10 is now supporting Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS, the latest Ubuntu LTS point release pulling in the graphics/kernel components from Ubuntu 18.10. So this should also allow the AMDGPU-PRO driver to work on Ubuntu 18.10 thanks to the shared components. This new driver release does not support the newly-minted Ubuntu 19.04 with AMD not supporting the non-LTS releases at least until those bits end up being found in an Ubuntu LTS point release.