Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Linux on AMD: Audio Issue Tackled and AMD Zen 3 CPU Support

  • AMD Prepares Fix To Address Clicking Issue With Audio Playback On Raven APUs

    Unfortunately it wasn't a trouble-free experience at launch but with time Raven Ridge APUs have been getting cleaned up on Linux for a pleasant experience, thanks in part to the Google Chromebook play that has also seen these newer AMD APUs seeing HDCP content protection support and PSP / TEE trusted execution functionality. The latest overdue improvement on the AMD Raven APU front is a fix for a pesky issue during audio playback. If playing audio streams immediately one after another, clicking noises can be heard. That is in the process of being resolved thanks to a new kernel patch.

  • AMD ZEN 3 CPU Added To Official Linux Kernel With ‘Family 19H’ Indicating Launch Of Next-Gen Processors With Higher IPC Gains?

    AMD’s ZEN 3 Architecture, the next-gen evolution of the company’s powerful CPUs, is now officially a part of the Linux Family. Spotted inside the Linux Kernel are direct references to the AMD’s Zen 3 CPU microcode. Given the recent developments about the as-yet-unannounced AMD Architecture that succeeds ZEN 2, it is quite likely the company could release the new CPUs based on ZEN 3 in the coming months. And, if the leaked benchmarks and test scores are to be believed, AMD has truly pushed its processors and managed to achieve a substantial leap in processor power with lesser power draw. After giving a tough competition to Intel last year, AMD appears to be readying a new lineup of CPUs that are based on the company’s latest Architecture, the ZEN 3. Based on the 7nm Fabrication Node, the Zen 3 is the 3rd iteration of the ZEN microarchitecture, which is built using the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) lithography process.

  • AMD Zen 3 CPU Support Added To Linux Kernel As We Get Closer To Official Announcement

    It looks like we are getting more closer to the launch of AMD's Zen 3 CPUs as microcode for the upcoming lineup has been added to the Linux Kernel, as spotted by Komachi. The AMD Zen 3 line of processors are aimed to hit in the coming quarters and it looks like they are going to be a bigger upgrade than we have anticipated as many leaks and official representatives have stated. [...] However, this means that in the upcoming months, AMD is definitely bringing us more news as also stated by AMD's CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, in the 'The Bring Up' interview where she states that Zen 3 architecture is doing really well, they are excited about it and that she looks forward to talking more about it later in 2020.

Latest in GNU/Linux-Chromebook Integration (Crostini)

  • Chrome OS 81 to allow Linux username selection for Crostini

    I’m not judging but apparently, some Chromebook users have some strange email addresses. And by strange, I mean they don’t allow you to set up the default user when installing Linux in Chrome OS. I’m joking a little here. However, this is a real issue for certain Gmail addresses because it’s that account that’s used to create the default user. [...] Based on the current code merge, when starting the Linux installation process, users will be prompted to supply a username, which is then applied to the Linux container system settings.

  • Linux on Chrome OS: Disk resizing and custom username now working in Canary Channel

    A couple of weeks ago, we unearthed work being done that will give users the ability to set a custom size for the allotted amount of disk space used by Crostini Linux on Chrome OS. Still disabled via a flag, the resizing feature was still just a placeholder at that time. Today, after an update to the Canary Channel, it looks like the resizing function is now live. It’s still behind a flag and disabled by default but enabling it and starting Crostini from scratch now gives you the option to pick the amount of disk space you want to use for Linux. [...] The renaming feature, like the resizing one, was disabled behind a flag and wasn’t working as of yesterday. With the latest update to Canary, the custom username feature is now working when the flag is enabled and it appears right above the resizing option when you install Crostini for the first time. Some users may like this feature simply because they want to create a unique username for Linux but for others, this will be a crucial update when it hits the Stable Channel in the coming months.

Open Hardware/Modding: Arduino IDE, Raspberry Pi and PocketPCR

  • Arduino IDE 1.8.11 now available to download

    The Arduino development team has today announced the availability of a new Arduino IDE in the form of Arduino 1.8.11. The open-source Arduino Software (IDE) makes it easy to write code and upload it to the range of Arduino development boards board. The Arduino IDE can be loaded onto Windows requires Win 8.1 or 10, Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion or newer, and Linux 32 and 64 bit computers and is written in Java and based on Processing and other open-source software.

  • Can you connect a Raspberry Pi to a GoPro Hero 6?

    A contractor is drilling in the office space above ours, and it sounds like we’re under attack by a swarm of very angry, Transformeresque bees. We can’t hear ourselves think. Although we can hear the drills.

  • Put The Power Of PCR In Your Pocket With This Open-Source Thermal Cycler

    When the first thermal cyclers for the polymerase chain reaction came out in the 1980s, they were as expensive as a market driven by grant money could make them. Things haven’t got much better over the years, largely shutting STEM classes and biohackers out of the PCR market. That may be about to change, though, if the €99.00 PocketPCR thermal cycler takes hold. PCR amplifies DNA in a three-step process: denaturation, which melts double-stranded DNA into single strands; annealing, which lets small pieces of primer DNA bind to either side of the region of interest; and elongation, where the enzyme DNA polymerase zips along the single strands starting at the primer to replicate the DNA. The cycle repeats and copies of the original DNA accumulate exponentially. Like any thermal cycler, [Urs Gaudenz]’s PocketPCR automates those temperature shifts, using a combination of PCB-mounted heating elements and a cooling fan. The coils rapidly heat a reaction block up to the 99°C denaturation temperature, the fan brings that down to the 68°C needed for annealing, and then the temperature ramps back up to 72°C for elongation with thermostable DNA polymerase. PID loops keep the reaction temperature precisely controlled. The whole thing is, as the name suggests, small enough to fit in a pocket, and can either be purchased in kit form or scratch-built from the build files on GitHub.

iXsystems' TrueNAS & FreeNAS Hit 11.3

FreeNAS is a free and open-source NAS software based off of FreeBSD and OpenZFS. It runs on commodity x86-64 hardware, as well as iXsystems gear. FreeNAS supports Window, macOS, and Unix as well as virtualization hosts like XenServer and VMware. TrueNAS is aimed at enterprise storage and supports SMB, AFP, NFS, iSCSI, SSH, rsync and FTP/TFTP sharing protocols over Ethernet and Fibre Channel network fabrics. TrueNAS also supports VMware as well as over protocols such as Microsoft CSV, ODX, and VSS, and Veeam. Part of the 11.3 update sees TrueNAS gain several of the features that were already running in FreeNAS, now fully vetted and ready to go to the enterprise. These features include the modernized web UI as well as the ability to use and manage jails, plugins, and VMs. The new features are available in TrueNAS X-Series and M-Series platforms that scale from 10TB to over 10PB with hybrid or all-flash models. Read more