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Games: DiRT 4, SuperTuxKart and The 10 Best Free Linux Games

  • DiRT4 Power Slides onto Linux in 2019
    DiRT 4 is the latest instalment of the popular franchise to drift on to free software platforms (as well as a non-free software platform in macOS). It follows on from the successful Linux release of DiRT Rally last spring. DiRT 4 was originally released on Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in June 2017 and has garnered plenty of praise, positive reviews and high review scores.
  • SuperTuxKart Spruces Up Its In-Game Visuals
    SuperTuxKart, the famous free software kart racer, is picking up some improved visuals within the in-game user interface and racing screens. Detailing their plans on the game’s official dev blog, the team behind the iconic racer have shared more details about the graphical spit and polish they’ve given the game ahead of its next major release.
  • Refreshing the GUI
    Online multiplayer won't be the focus of this new blog post : we will tell you more about it when launching the official beta in the coming weeks. Instead, we'll tell you more about the many changes in the game's UI.
  • The 10 Best Free Linux Games
    There are plenty of excellent games on Linux, and a fair amount of them are completely free. Some are open source, and others are fairly big names available through Steam. In every case, these are quality games that you can play any time on Linux at absolutely no cost.

Programming Leftovers

today's howtos

Review: openSUSE Tumbleweed (2018)

My experiment with openSUSE's Tumbleweed was a mixed experience. On the positive side, Tumbleweed stays constantly up to date, providing the latest packages of software all the time. For people who regularly want to stay on the cutting edge, but who do not want to re-install or perform a major version-to-version upgrade every six months, Tumbleweed provides an attractive option. I also really like that file system snapshots are automated and we can revert most problems simply by restarting the computer and choosing an older snapshot from the boot menu. On the negative side, a number of things didn't work during my time with the distribution. Media support was broken, the Discover software manager had a number of issues and some configuration modules caused me headaches. These rough edges sometimes get fixed, but may be traded out for other problems since the operating system is ever in flux. In the long term, a bigger issue may be the amount of network bandwidth and disk space Tumbleweed consumes. Just to keep up with updates we need set aside around 1GB of downloads per month and (when Btrfs snapshots are used) even more disk space. In a few weeks Tumbleweed consumed more disk space with far fewer programs installed as my installation of MX Linux. Unless we keep on top of house cleaning and constantly remove old snapshots we need to be prepared to use significantly more storage space than most other distributions require. Tumbleweed changes frequently and uses more resources to keep up with the latest software developments. I would not recommend it for newer Linux users or for people who want predictability in the lives. But for people who want to live on the cutting edge and don't mind a little trouble-shooting, Tumbleweed provides a way to keep up with new versions of applications while providing a safety net through Btrfs snapshots. Read more