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Programming Leftovers

  • Perl Weekly Challenge: Week #079: Count Set Bits & Trapped Rain Water

    I really enjoyed this week task. I had lots of fun working with the Trapped Rain Water task. This week, I was too busy with my $work, so couldn’t do either Swift coding or live video session. However I promise, I will catch up next week.

  • Add sound to your Python game

    Pygame provides an easy way to integrate sounds into your Python video game. Pygame's mixer module can play one or more sounds on command, and by mixing those sounds together, you can have, for instance, background music playing at the same time you hear the sounds of your hero collecting loot or jumping over enemies. It is easy to integrate the mixer module into an existing game, so—rather than giving you code samples showing you exactly where to put them—this article explains the four steps required to get sound in your application.

  • PyDev of the Week: William Cox

    This week we welcome William Cox as our PyDev of the Week. William is a data scientist who has spoken at a few Python conferences. He maintains a blog where you can catch up on what’s new with him [...] When I was 12 my dad dropped “Teach Yourself Perl in 21 Days” on my desk and said, “you should learn this.” It took me much longer than 21 days, but I’m glad he did that. I dabbled in several languages (PHP, Java, C) but spent many years in graduate school honing my MATLAB skills, due to its powerful plotting and data analysis capabilities. My first job was at a military contractor and they all used MATLAB. This was the early 10’s and Python was really taking off as the language of scientific computing so I was able to convince my boss that it was something I should be learning – he was especially attracted to how much money they could save over thir massive MATLAB bills. I got my 2nd job with my impressive iPython Notebook skills! It was, however, till I started my 2nd job that I finally started learning what it means to write software with a team. It’s a lot different than dabbling on your own.

  • Python Dictionary

    In this post, learn every thing about Python Dictionaries.

  • pkgKitten 0.2.0: Now with tinytest and new docs

    A new release 0.2.0 of pkgKitten just hit on CRAN today, or about eleven months after the previous release. This release brings support for tinytest by having pkgKitten::kitten() automagically call tinytest::puppy() if the latter package is installed (and the user did not opt out of calling it). So your newly created minimal package now also uses a wonderful yet tiny testing framework. We also added a new documentation site using the previously tweeted-about wrapper for Material for MkDocs I really dig. And last but not least we switched to BSPM-based Continued Integration (which I wrote about yesterday in R4 #30) and fixed one bug regarding the default NAMESPACE file.

Default window manager switched to CTWM in NetBSD-current

For more than 20 years, NetBSD has shipped X11 with the "classic" default window manager of twm. However, it's been showing its age for a long time now. In 2015, ctwm was imported, but after that no progress was made. ctwm is a fork of twm with some extra features - the primary advantages are that it's still incredibly lightweight, but highly configurable, and has support for virtual desktops, as well as a NetBSD-compatible license and ongoing development. Thanks to its configuration options, we can provide a default experience that's much more usable to people experienced with other operating systems. Read more

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Call an existing REST service with Apache Camel K

    With the release of Apache Camel K, it is possible to create and deploy integrations with existing applications that are quicker and more lightweight than ever. In many cases, calling an existing REST endpoint is the best way to connect a new system to an existing one. Take the example of a cafe serving coffee. What happens when the cafe wants to allow customers to use a delivery service like GrubHub? You would only need to introduce a single Camel K integration to connect the cafe and GrubHub systems. In this article, I will show you how to create a Camel K integration that calls an existing REST service and uses its existing data format. For the data format, I have a Maven project configured with Java objects. Ideally, you would have this packaged and available in a Nexus repository. For the purpose of my demonstration, I utilized JitPack, which lets me have my dependency available in a repository directly from my GitHub code. See the GitHub repository associated with this demo for the data format code and directions for getting it into JitPack.

  • Build a data streaming pipeline using Kafka Streams and Quarkus

    In typical data warehousing systems, data is first accumulated and then processed. But with the advent of new technologies, it is now possible to process data as and when it arrives. We call this real-time data processing. In real-time processing, data streams through pipelines; i.e., moving from one system to another. Data gets generated from static sources (like databases) or real-time systems (like transactional applications), and then gets filtered, transformed, and finally stored in a database or pushed to several other systems for further processing. The other systems can then follow the same cycle—i.e., filter, transform, store, or push to other systems. In this article, we will build a Quarkus application that streams and processes data in real-time using Kafka Streams. As we go through the example, you will learn how to apply Kafka concepts such as joins, windows, processors, state stores, punctuators, and interactive queries. By the end of the article, you will have the architecture for a realistic data streaming pipeline in Quarkus.

  • Fedora 32 : Can be better? part 012.

    Pidgin is a chat program which lets you log into accounts on multiple chat networks simultaneously. Pidgin can be install on multiple operating systems and platforms. Pidgin is compatible with the following chat networks out of the box: I.R.C., Jabber/XMPP, Bonjour, Gadu-Gadu, IRC, Novell GroupWise Messenger, Lotus Sametime, SILC, SIMPLE, and Zephyr. Can it be better? The only problems a user in need of help may have are in the command line environment. Obviously, in this case, this application cannot be used. I would suggest building a terminal application like WeeChat dedicated to Fedora users and including I.R.C channels. Now, let's install this application.

Touchégg 2.0.0 Released: A Linux Multi-Touch Gesture Recognizer App

For years, it has continued to work in every desktop environment. However, as the Linux desktop has advanced a lot, Touchégg fails to work on desktop environments using modern technologies like Wayland compositor. Therefore, Jose has now revised, completely rewrote the old version, and released a new version 2.0.0 after more than years of gap. The new release aims to make the app compatible with new technology stacks incorporated in GNOME, KDE, and other desktops. Read more