Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Self-supported Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server virty users see stealth inflation

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server has maintained the same starting price over the past few years. Now, changes to the way the software is licensed have doubled the cost for some self-support customers using virtual machines. The change dates back to 2019, when Red Hat said its Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server, Self-support (RH0197181) was in the process of being retired and has been superseded by Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Entry Level, Self-support (RH00005). According to a Red Hat spokesperson, RH00005 debuted in 2013 and RH0197181 stopped being sold in 2015. Both of these RHEL SKUs sell, or were sold, for $349 in the US. But only the discontinued product allows the use of virtualization at the lowest price tier. Now customers who opted for the discontinued entry-level offering have found they need to pay more than twice as much ($799 for the standard tier) to run a guest VM on a physical system. What's more, Red Hat in its subscription guide declares that its self-supported option "is not intended for production environments," making it clear that self-supported commercial usage with VM support requires greater investment that before. Read more

Christian Hergert: A GTK 4 based Text Editor

It started as an application for me to verify the correctness of the GtkSourceView 5 API (which targets GTK 4). After that it helped me implement JIT support for GtkSourceView languages. Once that was done it became my test case while I wrote the GTK 4 macOS backend and revamped the GL renderer. It is a simple and humble text editor. It does not have all the corner cases you’d expect from a text editor yet. It does not have aspirations to be a programmers text editor. Now that you know this is very much a technology preview release only, you might be tempted to keep your important data away from it. Read more

Linux 5.12-rc2

Ok, so this is a couple of days early, but rc1 had the nasty swapfile
issue, so I'm just accelerating rc2 a bit.

Outside of the swapfile IO offset fix, the only other thing that
stands out is some io_uring thread handling re-organization, which not
only solved a few fundamental issues, but actually made the code
smaller and simpler too.

Other than that it all looks pretty normal: drivers dominate (with
sound being most notable, with the ASoC Intel SOF support being split
up sanely). But there's some btrfs work, kvm, iscsi, etc. A few random
things all over.

Shortlog appended for your viewing pleasure, and I sincerely hope (and
believe) that rc2 is in a lot better shape than rc1 was.

              Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.12-rc2 Released Early - A Rare Friday Kernel Due To That Nasty Corruption Issue Radeon RX 6800 Series Seeing Some Small Gains With Linux 5.12 - Phoronix

today's howtos

  • Specify Name (Save As) When Saving File in vi / vim

    The vi (or vim) text editor is a very effective text editor for Linux / UNIX systems. It has been around since 1976 and you either love it or hate it. In order to be effective with the editor, it is important to know all the commands. One such command is specifying the name, or save as, of the file before you write it to disk. Let’s take a look at how to use the “save as” feature in vim.

  •  
  • Josef Strzibny: Download RPM packages locally with DNF

    Sometimes, you only want to download RPM packages without installing them. This is now super easy with DNF. If you remember Yum, you had to resolve to installing a yum-plugin-downloadonly plugin or a separate tool to be able to download them for inspection.

  • Arturo Borrero González: Openstack Neutron L3 failover issues

    In the Cloud Services team at the Wikimedia Foundation we use Openstack Neutron to build our virtual network, and in particular, we rely on the neutron-l3-agent for implementing all the L3 connectivity, topology and policing. This includes basic packet firewalling and NAT. As of this writing, we are using Openstack version Train. We run the neutron-l3-agent on standard linux hardware servers with 10G NICs, and in general it works really well. Our setup is rather simple: we have a couple of servers for redundancy (note: upstream recommends having 3) and each server runs an instance of neutron-l3-agent. We don’t use DVR, so all ingress/egress network traffic (or north-south traffic) flows using these servers. Today we use a flat network topology in our cloud. This means that all of our virtual machines share the same router gateway. Therefore, we only have one software-defined router. Neutron does a very smart thing: each software-defined router is implemented on a linux network namespace (netns). Each router living on its own netns, the namespace contains all IP addresses, routes, interfaces, netfilter firewalling rules, NAT configuration, etc. Additionally, we configure the agents and software-defined routers to be deployed on an high availability fashion. Neutron implements this by running an instance of keepalived (VRRP) inside each router netns. The gateway IP is therefore a virtual address that can move between the two instances of the neutron-l3-agent.

  •            
  • Prepare for successful container adoption with these tips

    IT teams use containers to build more dynamic applications and support modern microservice architectures. And containers are a critical tool for IT organizations to take advantage of innovations, such as cloud services, Agile methodology, DevOps collaboration and mobile apps. As businesses turn to containers to fuel development and support infrastructures, they must identify which workloads benefit from containerization, as well as strategize automation benefits and deploy the right tools for management. As a result, IT teams are better positioned to evaluate savings potential, adopt key DevOps processes and apply IT training where necessary. In this article, we explore containerization's history and its uses, assess ideal workloads, potential operational savings and key management approaches.

  • How to Install VirtualBox 6.1 On Linux?

    Virtual Machines are software used to run other operating systems within a pre-installed operating system. This self-contained OS runs as a separate computer that has no relation to the host OS. VirtualBox is an open-source cross-platform software that can help you run multiple guest operating systems on a single computer. In this article, let’s look at how to install VirtualBox 6.1 on Linux, easily. Why Install VirtualBox? One of the most important use cases of VirtualBox is its ability to try out/test various operating systems without fiddling with your internal storage. VirtualBox creates a virtual environment that utilizes system resources like RAM and CPU to power the OS inside a container.