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Fedora Workstation 31 – What's new

Fedora has been leading the migration to Wayland since day one and we are not planning to stop. XWayland on demand has been an effort a lot of people contributed to this cycle. The goal is to only need XWayland for legacy X applications, not have it started and running all the time as that is a waste of system resources and also having core functionality still depend on X under Wayland makes the system more fragile. XWayland-on-demand has been a big effort with contributions from a lot of people and companies. One piece of this was the Systemd user session patches that was originally written by Iain Lane from Canonical. They had been lingering for a bit so Benjamin Berg took those patches on for this cycle and helped shepherd them over the finish line and get them merged upstream. This work wasn’t a hard requirement for Wayland-on-demand, but since it makes it a lot easier to do different things under X and Wayland which in turn makes moving towards XWayland-on-demand a little simpler to implement. That work will also allow (in future releases) us to do things like only start services under GNOME that are actually needed for your hardware, so for instance if you don’t have a bluetooth adapter in your computer there is no reason to run the bits of GNOME dealing with bluetooth. So expect further resource savings coming from this work over time. Carlos Garnacho then spent time going through GNOME Shell removing any lingering X dependencies while Olivier Fourdan worked on cleaning up the control center. This work has mostly landed, but it is hidden behind an experimental flag (gsettings set org.gnome.mutter experimental-features "[...,'autostart-xwayland']") in Fedora 31 as we need to mature it a bit more before its ready for primetime. But we hope and expect to have it running by default in Fedora Workstation 32. Read more Also: Fedora Workstation 31 Should Be Another Fantastic Release For Desktop Linux

today's leftovers

  • Lima Gallium3D Picks Up A Buffer Object Cache, Partial Updates

    The Lima Gallium3D driver for supporting Arm Mali 400/450 graphics hardware within Arm SoCs has picked up a few performance optimizations. Vasily Khoruzhick has contributed a buffer object cache to this Gallium3D driver to avoid the great overhead costs to allocating buffer objects. The BO cache for Lima is modeled after the Broadcom V3D Gallium3D driver's BO cache.

  • Akademy Behind!

    The framework-for-that idea lives on, though: today I was looking for something to extract the Exec= line from a .desktop file, and there’s a framework for that (KIO does the job, but that’s a pretty heavy dependency for what I wanted; I’ll need to think about it some). Third year running (Almeria, Vienna, Milan), I presented the BoF wrap-up session at the end of the day – that’s mostly acting as MC to get other people to tell their stories. Here’s thursday and friday for instance, via the dot. Videos are on YouTube. For next year, I’d like to train some other people to do the presentation – because there are so many other faces in KDE. I have high hopes for Caio (of KPMCore and other things) and Aish (GCompris) who I’d like to see out there fronting for the KDE community. For being a loud person I’ve now been appropriately punished, by being voted on to the board of KDE e.V. (that page needs an update). I’ll be doing generally useful things, I hope, which means massaging the community code of conduct and spending money from our donors on events all over the world where people from all corners of the KDE community can participate.

  • ClonOS 19.09-RELEASE

    FreeBSD 13.0-CURRENT (r352386) cloud-init support (see errata) fixed fbbuf/vesa video issue with some recent Linux distros ( Kali Linux, Parrot, etc..) p9fs support (*) CBSD updated to 12.1.1 fixed known SQL injection vulnerabilities

  • EndeavourOS 2019.09.15 overview | AN ARCH-BASED DISTRO WITH A FRIENDLY COMMUNITY IN ITS CORE

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of EndeavourOS 2019.09.15 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Cameron Kaiser: A quick note for 64-bit PowerPC Firefox builders

    If you build Firefox on 64-bit Linux, *BSD, etc. for your G5, you may want to check out this Talospace article for an upcoming low-level fix especially as we need to ensure big-endian systems work fine with it. The problem never affected OS X Firefox for Power Macs because those builds were only ever 32-bit, and even TenFourFox is 32-bit through and through even on the G5 largely for reasons of Carbon compatibility which we need for some pieces of the widget code. Since this is syndicated on Planet Mozilla let me give a big thanks to Ted Campbell for figuring out the root cause, which turned out to be a long-standing problem I don't think anyone ever noticed before.

  • Preventing Lubuntu 18.04 from leaving a user process running after the user logs out
  • List Device Names, Disk and Partition Information in Linux with lsblk

Programming Leftovers

  • HEURISTIC ALGORITHMS FOR THE PROBLEM OF OPTIMIZATION OF THE DRAIN AREA IN UNCONVENTIONAL FIELDS OF HYDROCARBONS

    In a previous work, a linear programming based procedure was presented for this problem, and this procedure allowed to solve real-life instances, albeit -in some cases- producing plans with overlappings among the pads (since a relaxation is solved) and suffering from memory issues.

  • Getting Started With Async Features in Python

    Have you heard of asynchronous programming in Python? Are you curious to know more about Python async features and how you can use them in your work? Perhaps you’ve even tried to write threaded programs and run into some issues. If you’re looking to understand how to use Python async features, then you’ve come to the right place.

  • Anaconda Enterprise Receives Honors in Fourth Annual Datanami Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards

    Anaconda’s enterprise data science platform has been recognized in the fourth annual Datanami Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards, presented during the Strata Data Conference.

  • Exploratory Data Analysis Made Easy At The Command Line

    There are countless tools and libraries in Python for data scientists to perform powerful analyses, but they often have a setup cost that acts as a barrier to ad-hoc exploration of data. Visidata is a command line application that eliminates the friction involved with starting the discovery process. In this episode Saul Pwanson explains his motivation for creating it, why a terminal environment is a useful place for this work, and how you can use Visidata for your own work. If you have ever avoided looking at a data set because you couldn't be bothered with the boilerplate for a Jupyter notebook, then Visidata is the perfect addition to your toolbox. [...] There are countless tools and libraries in Python for data scientists to perform powerful analyses, but they often have a setup cost that acts as a barrier to ad-hoc exploration of data. Visidata is a command line application that eliminates the friction involved with starting the discovery process. In this episode Saul Pwanson explains his motivation for creating it, why a terminal environment is a useful place for this work, and how you can use Visidata for your own work. If you have ever avoided looking at a data set because you couldn’t be bothered with the boilerplate for a Jupyter notebook, then Visidata is the perfect addition to your toolbox.

SUSE and Red Hat Leftovers

  • Skuba on SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    With SUSE CaaS Platform 4 we heard our customers feedback and decided to change what the lifecycle of the platform looks like. Previous versions of SUSE CaaS Platform included an administrator node that despite being useful for managing the whole platform, was another component to take care of, and an extra machine to take into account when deploying the platform. This administrator node used Salt to set up and maintain the Kubernetes cluster among the different nodes comprising your cluster. During this time, your feedback has been that a little more flexibility on the deployment was appreciated, so you could experiment with slightly different setups, even if they were for proof of concepts while you were fleshing out the details of production clusters.

  • Kubernetes Rolling Update Strategy in our production infra

    Kubernetes rolling update strategy means suppose we are running pod (containers) in our live infra and we want to update new changes into our running pod like build update, confrontational changes etc. While deployment new pod with new changes suppose our containers got stuck or failed due to any reason. So, we have to redeploy old pod with old changes again to avoid downtime of our application. This complete process is called rolling update strategy in Kubernetes. Kubernetes rolling update strategy Before moving to next we should aware about new pod deployment strategy of Kubernetes means how many new pods it will deploy at a time without taking downtime. Because high availability of our website is our first priority. So, while deploying new pod Kubernetes will deploy 25% or you can say one fourth of the total pod. Suppose we are running four pods first it will terminate 25% of total pod means one pod. Then it will launch 25% new pod and so on.

  • Tackle OpenStack networking woes with SUSE OpenStack Cloud Crowbar

    By far, the most difficult aspect of successfully deploying OpenStack is getting the networking right, a challenge that has caused many a well-intentioned IT team to throw up its hands and toss in the towel. Fortunately, SUSE OpenStack Cloud removes much of that pain by automating most of the network deployment and dramatically simplifying custom network set-ups.

  • Grow your virtualization environments without breaking the bank

    An IT director at a large financial services company shares the benefits and cost reductions they’ve experienced by switching to Red Hat Virtualization. In just three years, it’s paved the way for an efficient, stable and cost-effective virtualization environment.

  • How to Handle OpenShift Worker Nodes Resources in Overcommitted State

    One of the benefits in adopting a system like OpenShift is facilitating burstable and scalable workload. Horizontal application scaling involves adding or removing instances of an application to match demand. When OpenShift schedules a Pod, it’s important that the nodes have enough resources to actually run it. If a user schedules a large application (in the form of Pod) on a node with limited resources , it is possible for the node to run out of memory or CPU resources and for things to stop working! It’s also possible for applications to take up more resources than they should. This could be caused by a team spinning up more replicas than they need to artificially decrease latency or simply because of a configuration change that causes a program to go out of control and try to use 100% of the available CPU resources. Regardless of whether the issue is caused by a bad developer, bad code, or bad luck, what’s important is how a cluster administrator can manage and maintain control of the resources. In this blog, let’s take a look at how you can solve these problems using best practices.

  • How the new Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code improves the development experience

    Earlier this year, we were introduced to Quarkus, the next-generation, container-first framework for Java applications. As expected, such new frameworks and technologies make way for new developer tools focused on making the development experience even better. The recent Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code release aims to do just that, by bringing features specific to Quarkus project development within VS Code. The new VS Code extension is dependent on a couple of Java extensions for VS Code, so it is recommended that you have the Java Extension Pack installed. This article outlines what the Quarkus extension for VS Code has to offer: convenient features for an already convenient Java framework.