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Khadas VIM3 NPU ToolKit Release & Video Demo

The toolkit works in host PCs running Ubuntu 16.04 or 18.04 with Tensorflow framework, and inference can run on both Linux and Android OS in Khadas VIM3/3L board. It includes an Inception v3 sample with 299×299 sample photos, among other demos. You’ll find documentation to get started with model conversion and inference in Linux on Khadas Wiki. Read more

Games: Prison Architect, Rocket League, Unrailed!, Dwarrows, Streets of Rogue

  • Psych Ward: Warden's Edition the first PC expansion for Prison Architect is out with a big free update

    Now that Paradox Interactive own the rights to Prison Architect, with Double Eleven handling the development they've released the first PC DLC with Psych Ward: Warden's Edition. This is an upgraded version of a DLC pack that consoles had for a while, so it's good to see it actually land for PC players too.

  • Psyonix give some details on the item shop coming to Rocket League

    One of the last pieces of the pie to replace their current loot box system in Rocket League is the Item Shop, which Psyonix have now talked about. The item shop will be joined alongside their new Blueprint system to finally get rid of loot box gambling in an update due next month. It's a nice step, as loot boxes are a terrible system but this also comes with its own set of issues. Firstly, the Item Shop is going to be replacing the Showroom, the place where you can view DLC in-game. With it, you will be able to pick a specific item and purchase it with Credits. You will be able to buy Credits in bundles from 500-6500 with a price from $4.99 to $49.99.

  • Chaotic track building game Unrailed! now has a Beta for Linux

    Developer Indoor Astronaut announced yesterday that their amusing and chaotic track building game Unrailed! now has a Beta available for Linux players to try out.

  • Dwarrows, a 3rd person adventure and town-building game will be released for Linux

    After a successful Kickstarter campaign way back in 2016, Lithic Entertainment have been progressing well with their 3rd person adventure and town-building game Dwarrows. Seems like this was one we entirely missed too, even though during their crowdfunding campaign it was announced that it will have Linux support. It's not yet released though, they're expecting to launch sometime in Q1 2020. However, they're currently running a Beta for backers and in August the first Linux build arrived.

  • Streets of Rogue now has a Level Editor and Steam Workshop in Beta, along with an update released

    Streets of Rogue, the incredibly fun rogue-lite from Matt Dabrowski has a new update out. This includes a playable version of the Level Editor and Steam Workshop support in Beta, with new content also available for everyone.

Translation Workshop in Indonesia this Weekend

The KDE Indonesia Community will once again hold a Kopdar (local term for BoF). This meeting is the second meeting after the successful meeting in 2018. The activity will be held this weekend with talks and activities about translating KDE software into Indonesian. The main event is for KDE fans in particular and Linux in general to collaborate in KDE translation. Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Python Bytes Episode #157: Oh hai Pandas, hold my hand?

    Data validation and settings management using python type annotations.

  • Simulate gravity in your Python game

    The real world is full of movement and life. The thing that makes the real world so busy and dynamic is physics. Physics is the way matter moves through space. Since a video game world has no matter, it also has no physics, so game programmers have to simulate physics. In terms of most video games, there are basically only two aspects of physics that are important: gravity and collision. You implemented some collision detection when you added an enemy to your game, but this article adds more because gravity requires collision detection. Think about why gravity might involve collisions. If you can't think of any reasons, don't worry—it'll become apparent as you work through the sample code. Gravity in the real world is the tendency for objects with mass to be drawn toward one another. The larger the object, the more gravitational influence it exerts. In video game physics, you don't have to create objects with mass great enough to justify a gravitational pull; you can just program a tendency for objects to fall toward the presumed largest object in the video game world: the world itself.

  • How to document Python code with Sphinx

    Python code can include documentation right inside its source code. The default way of doing so relies on docstrings, which are defined in a triple quote format. While the value of documentation is well... documented, it seems all too common to not document code sufficiently. Let's walk through a scenario on the power of great documentation. After one too many whiteboard tech interviews that ask you to implement the Fibonacci sequence, you have had enough. You go home and write a reusable Fibonacci calculator in Python that uses floating-point tricks to get to O(1).