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Python Programming

  • Strptime Python

    Strptime python is used to convert string to datetime object.

  • Book review – Effective Python, by Brett Slatkin (and a free chapter for download)

    Those among you who have already learned some Python or may even have used it in some projects will certainly have heard the expression “Pythonic Code”, which conveys a general and somewhat wide meaning of “clean code and good software development practices in the context of Python”. With Effective Python, the author presents you with nothing less than 90 practical examples on how to adopt a pythonic developer mindset and how to write better Python code.

  • Application and Request Contexts in Flask

    The first blog post provides examples of how to the Application and Request contexts work, including how the current_app, request, test_client, and test_request_context can be used to effectively used to avoid pitfalls with these contexts. The second blog post provides a series of diagrams illustrating how the Application and Request contexts are processed when a request is handled in Flask. This post also dives into how LocalStack objects work, which are the objects used for the Application Context Stack and the Request Context Stack.

  • Python Community Interview With David Amos

    I discovered programming by accident when I came across the source code for the Gorillas game on my parents’ IBM 386 PS/2 computer. I guess I was about seven or eight years old. I found something called a .BAS file that opened up a program called QBasic and had all sorts of strange-looking text in it. I was instantly intrigued! There was a note at the top of the file that explained how to adjust the game speed. I changed the value and ran the game. The effect was instantly noticeable. It was a thrilling experience. I was obsessed with learning to program in QBasic. I made my own text adventure games. I even made a few animations using simple geometric shapes. It was tons of fun! QBasic was a fantastic language for an eight-year-old kid to learn. It was challenging enough to keep me interested but easy enough to get quick results, which is really important for a child. When I was around ten years old, I tried to teach myself C++. The ideas were too complex, and results came too slowly. After a few months of struggling, I stopped. But the idea of programming computers remained attractive to me—enough so that I took a web technology class in high school and learned the basics of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. In college, I decided to major in mathematics, but I needed a minor. I chose computer science because I thought having some experience with programming would make it easier to complete the degree requirements. I learned about data structures with C++. I took an object-oriented programming class with Java. I studied operating systems and parallel computing with C. My programming horizons expanded vastly, and I found the whole subject pleasing both practically and intellectually.

  • PyCharm 2020.3 EAP – Starts now!

    The Early Access Program for our next major release, PyCharm 2020.3, is now open! If you are always looking forward to the next ‘big thing’ we encourage you to join the program and share your thoughts on the latest PyCharm improvements! [...] If you’re on Ubuntu 16.04 or later, you can use snap to get PyCharm EAP and stay up to date. You can find the installation instructions on our website.

  • Extracting two SDF data items with chemfp's text toolkit

    This is part of a series of essays about working with SD files at the record and simple text level. In yesterday's essay I showed several examples of using chemfp's text toolkit API to process records from an SD file. In some cases, reading the entire record is too much work so in this essay I'll show some examples of extracting just two pieces of information (a title and a single SDF data item value, or two data item values) from the records. [...] In yesterday's essay I noticed that most records in the ChEBI SDF distribution ChEBI_complete.sdf.gz contain a SMILES data item. (112,938 out of 113,902 to be precise.) Let's extract those to make a SMILES files! (We could of course use a chemistry toolkit to parse the connection table into a molecule then generate a SMILES, but that's not the point of this essay.)

  • Talk Python to Me: #283 Web scraping, the 2020 edition

    Web scraping is pulling the HTML of a website down and parsing useful data out of it. The use-cases for this type of functionality are endless. Have a bunch of data on governmental sites that are only listed online in HTML without a download? There's an API for that! Do you want to keep abreast of what your competitors are featuring on their site? There's an API for that. Need alerts for changes on a website, for example enrollment is now open at your college and you want to be first to get in and avoid the 8am Monday morning course slot? There's an API for that. That API is screen scraping and Attila Tóth from ScrapingHub is here to tell us all about it.

Screencasts and Audiocasts: Linux Lite 5.2 RC1, TLLTS, Tiling Window Managers, Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly

  • Linux Lite 5.2 RC1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Linux Lite 5.2 RC1.

  • Linux Lite 5.2 RC1

    Today we are looking at Linux Lite 5.2 RC1. It is based on Ubuntu 20.04 (will be supported until April 2025), Linux Kernel 5.4, XFCE 4.14, and uses about 800MB of ram when idling. Enjoy and it looks beautiful!

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 875

    ubiquiti woes, 3d printers, new or fix

  • The Dishonest Criticisms Against Tiling Window Managers

    I've noticed that anytime I do a video about window managers, especially tiling window managers, that I get a lot of comments about how people shouldn't waste their time with window managers and that it isn't worth the effort involved. I think those arguments are dishonest and I want to address them.

  • Destination Linux 192: Super Productivity Interview & Big Updates On Nvidia Buying ARM

    This week the DL Triforce brings to an Interview with the developer of Super Productivity, a To-Do App for Linux. There’s a lot of new updates in the Nvidia Acquisition of ARM and how RISC-V might come into play. We’re also going to ask some Community Feedback including a question about why we wouldnt use BSD if Linux wasn’t available. The we discuss Xfce’s upcoming 4.16 release. In the Gaming section this week we get you prepped for a spooky Halloween and we talk about the new DLN Xonotic Server. Later in the show we’ll give you our popular tips/tricks and software picks. Plus so much more, coming up right now on Destination Linux.

  • FLOSS Weekly 597: Declaration of Digital Autonomy - User Freedom, Consent & Rights

    What are the rights users have when using technology built by big tech? Doc Searls and Dan Lynch talk with Molly De Blanc and Karen Sandler, and discuss their Declaration of Digital Autonomy. The declaration was created to build awareness and ideally change people's rights and freedoms when it comes to technology. They talk about what needs to change to make technology serve the individual and not the companies who intend to monetize its use. Individuals don't understand the contract they have with their technology and that is why this declaration is so important. De Blanc and Sandler invite listeners to email their ideas to thoughts@techautonomy.org to continue this conversation on digital autonomy.

  • Developer Unfriendly | Coder Radio 380

Android Leftovers

Still not dead: The mainframe hangs on, sustained by Linux and hybrid cloud

The mainframe has been declared “dead”, “morphed” and “transformed” so many times over the years sometimes it’s sometimes hard to believe the Big Iron still has an identity in the enterprise world. But clearly it does and in a major way, too. Take recent news as an example: According to IBM, 75% of the top 20 global banks are running the newest z15 mainframe, and the IBM Systems Group reported a 68% gain in Q2 IBM Z revenue year-over-year. At the heart of its current vitality is Linux—primarily in the form of Big Iron-based Red Hat OpenShift—and a variety of software such as IBM Cloud Paks and open source applications. The Linux-mainframe marriage is celebrating 20 years this month, and while the incongruous mashup—certainly at the beginning anyway—has been a boon for the mainframe, by most accounts it still has plenty of good years ahead of it. Read more