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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Linux and Arduino Hardware

  • An open source desk to showcase your projects, complete with swappable panels | Arduino Blog

    Almost every maker has run into the problem of not being able to find a convenient display or power source for their project prototype, and thus leading to minor delays and some frustration. However, YouTuber Another Maker has come up with an open source desk concept that makes finding these things simple. The system he built uses a large grid of swappable panels that can simply slide into place within a wooden frame. Behind these are a few devices for both power and connectivity, such as power strips, an Ethernet switch (with PoE capabilities), and an HDMI switch for changing between a Raspberry Pi and a PC.

  • Tiger Lake-H modules include Nano-ITX-sized COM-HPC Client B model

    Congatec announced “Conga-HPC/cTLH” (COM-HPC Client B) and “Conga-TS570” (Basic Type 6) modules with up to octa-core Tiger Lake-H CPUs. The Conga-HPC/cTLH offers up to 128GB DDR4, optional NVMe, 20x PCIe Gen4, 2x 2.5GbE, 2x USB 4.0, and 8K support.

  • Intel Core i5-1135G7 Tiger Lake mini PC with 12GB RAM sells for $700 and up

    Minisforum TL50 is a mini PC based on Intel Core i5-1135G7 Tiger Lake quad-core/octa-thread processor that ships with 12GB RAM, and optional 256GB and 512GB SSD preloaded with Windows 10 Pro. The mini PC also features two 2.5 Gbps Gigabit Ethernet ports, two 2.5-inch SATA drives, one M.2 slot for NVMe SSD, and supports 8K and 4K monitor setups through HDMI, DisplayPort, and USB-C video outputs. It was announced a few months ago, but it’s now available for sale for $699.99 and more on Banggood depending on storage options.

Kernel: Linux Work by Intel. Oracle, and AMD

  • Intel Proposes Linux Kernel Driver Allow/Deny Filtering

    As part of their work around Trust Domain Extensions (TDX) support for Linux, Intel engineers are proposing a driver filter option for Linux to be able to set allow or deny lists of driver(s) that can or cannot be loaded by the booted kernel. In order to reduce the attack surface within guest virtual machines while still wanting to be able to use the same kernel build between a host and guest, Intel engineers are looking to add this driver filter support to the kernel. When booting the guest, via the kernel command-line they can just specify the specific drivers to allow to be loaded by the kernel or alternatively setting a list of specific drivers that shouldn't be allowed to be loaded by the system.

  • Oracle Working On BPF CO-RE Support For GCC To Easily Run BPF Programs On Any Kernel

    Running eBPF kernel programs continues to be increasing popular and used for a variety of use-cases in production environments but one of the challenges is around needing to compile the (e)BPF programs for a given kernel while BPF CO-RE has been working to change that. The LLVM Clang compiler already supports the ability for BPF "Compile Once, Run Everywhere" while now Oracle engineers are working to bring the same level of support to GCC.

  • AMD PTDMA Driver Revised Ahead Of Its Possible Inclusion For Linux 5.15 - Phoronix

    One of the AMD patch series that has been in the works for more than one year is the PTDMA driver providing pass-through DMA engine support on Linux. The driver is now up to its eleventh revision but the mainlining might happen soon. The AMD PTDMA Linux driver effort dates back to September 2019 for enabling their PTDMA controller in performing high bandwidth memory-to-memory and I/O copy operations. Modern AMD CPUs support multiple PTDMA controllers, the PTDMA driver hooks into the kernel's direct memory access (DMA) subsystem and is intended to be used with AMD Non-Transparent Bridge (NTB) devices but not for general purpose peripheral DMA.

today's howtos

  • How To Install Play Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Play Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Play Framework is a framework that allows us to make web applications with Java and Scala in a fast and easy way. These applications are based on scalability and the possibility that they can be adapted to many different needs. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of Play Framework on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Fix Sudo Command Not Found in Debian 10

    Sudo also called “superuser do” is a command in Linux that allows you to run high-privilege admin commands as a root user. It asked to enter your personal password and confirms your requests by checking a sudoers file. After a fresh Debian 10 installation, you could not execute the privileges tasks by running the sudo command. You will get the error ‘sudo command not found in Debian 10′. The reason for this error is the sudo command isn’t included in Debian 10 by default. In this post, we will show you how to fix sudo command not found in Debian 10 VPS.

  • How to Replace a Variable in a File Using SED

    Want to know the tricks of replacing a variable in a file using the SED command? This article will give you an overview of replacing a variable value in a file using SED. Before replacing a variable in a file using SED, you need to understand what SED is, the syntax of SED, and how SED works. I’ll also show how to perform delete operations using SED. This will come after the variable value replacement part. If you’re looking for that, you can directly jump onto that, and skip the rest. So, let’s begin the guide.

  • How to Transfer Files Between Linux, Android, and iOS Using Snapdrop

    Cross-platform file sharing has never been easy. Of course, you have services like AirDrop, Nearby Share, and Quick Share, but they only work within their ecosystems. As a result, if you want to transfer files from Linux to an Android/iOS device or vice-versa, you need a cross-platform file sharing service. Even though you do have a few different options in this regard, Snapdrop is the most effective file-sharing service of the lot.

  • What to do when your Chromebook is no longer supported

    Recently, my Chromebook Pixel 2015 found itself no longer supported. I really loved that Chromebook. The two of us wrote several novels together and the keyboard/screen was unmatched. To this day I've yet to experience a better keyboard/trackpad combo. But, as they say, all things must end. So, when I received the notification that my Chromebook Pixel would no longer be receiving updates, I felt a tinge of sadness. Sure, I had a Pixelbook as a backup device, but it just wasn't the same. It had a nice keyboard, but it was nowhere near that of the Pixel. And the screen? There was zero comparison. I had a choice: Continue using the Pixel, even though it would no longer be receiving upgrades, or do something about it.