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Raku Programming

  • vrurg: The Report On New Coercions Part 2

    I didn’t expect my previous report to have a continuation, but here it goes. When the initial implementation of new coercions was merged, I started checking if there’re any tickets in the issue tracker which can now be closed. One of them, #2446, is related to coercions but still needed a fix. As long as I was looking into the ticket, it was becoming clear to me that the time has come for an itch I had had for quite some time already.

  • Day 1: Why Raku is the ideal language for Advent of Code – Raku Advent Calendar

    Now that it’s December, it’s time for two of my favorite traditions from the tech world: the Raku Advent Calendar and Advent of Code. These two holiday traditions have a fair amount in common – they both run from December 1 through Christmas, and both involve releasing something new every day during the event. Specifically, the Raku Advent Calendar releases a new blog post about the Raku programming language, while Advent of Code releases a new programming challenge – which can be solved in any language. (In this post, I’ll be referring to Advent of Code as “AoC” – not to be confused with the American politician AOC who, to the best of my knowledge, does not program in Raku.) For me, Raku and AoC are the chocolate and peanut butter of tech Advent season: each is great on its own, but they’re even better in combination. If your only goal is to solve AoC challenges, Raku is a great language to use; on the other hand, if your only goal is to learn Raku, then solving AoC challenges is a great way to do so. This post will explain how Raku and AoC are such a good fit and then provide some resources to help us all get started solving AoC challenges.

  • nomen est omen | Playing Perl 6␛b6xA Raku

    Even with the help of his time machine, delivering all presents in a single night keeps Santa extremely busy. With little time to spare he does all his coding in Raku. One of the advantages of time travel, is the option to use the last version of the last programming language.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2020.48 DevRoom on FOSDEM

    Next year’s FOSDEM will be an online event only, on 6/7 February 2021. It will also have a Raku Programming Language DevRoom track, shared with Perl. Please contact JJ Merelo (on Twitter or on the #raku IRC channel) if you are interested in giving a presentation about your experiences with Raku!

Nitrux 1.3.5 Released with Latest KDE Plasma and Applications

The KDE Plasma and Ubuntu-based distribution Nitrux 1.3.5 released with its latest version. Here we take a look at what's new, download links, features and more. Read more

WWW: WordPress, Chrome, Mozilla

  • Half of Websites Will Be WordPress-Driven by 2025 / Digital Information World

    Based on CMS usage trends, now available for 2019 and most of the current year, several outlets have projected that WordPress will be the driving force behind half of all websites by 2025. According to the newest numbers by W3Techs, its usage is growing by 2.47% per year on average. If it continues at this rate, WordPress will surpass 50% market share, potentially within the next five years. [...] The pandemic has hastened the shift from brick-and-mortar to e-commerce by roughly five years. Today's 'online first' strategy is commonplace for many new and established businesses. However, as of 2019, less than two-thirds of small businesses had a website. For many business thought-leaders, the idea that a brand is too small or unsuitable for online trade ceases to exist. In the post-millennial marketplace, stores without an online presence give the impression that you're no longer in business. The trajectory of WordPress has historically depended on the demands of its users. It's continuously unfolded to cater to millions of bloggers and webmasters around the globe. Improvements such as REST API and the Gutenberg editor means WordPress is now better placed to contend with closed-source competitors Shopify, Wix, and Squarespace. Furthermore, you can anticipate developers will see WordPress as a simple solution to power the expansion of all varieties of mobile and web apps.

  • Chrome to remove HTTP/2 Push

    Chromium developers have announced that they plan to remove support for HTTP/2 server push from the market-leading browser engine. Server push lets web servers preemptively send clients resources it expects them to request later. The technique can reduce the number of network round-trips required before the client has all the resources it needs to display a page. The announcement cited high implementation complexity, low adoption among websites, and questionable performance gains as the reason for the removal. Server push is an optional feature introduced in the HTTP/2 standard. Chrome can remove it and remain compatible with the HTTP/2 standard. When used correctly, server push can greatly improve page-load times. It also enables use-cases like instant redirects.

  • celery-batches 0.4 released!

    Earlier today I released a version 0.4 of celery-batches with support for Celery 5.0. As part of this release support for Python < 3.6 was dropped and support for Celery < 4.4 was dropped.

  • This Week in Glean: Glean is Frictionless Data Collection

    So you want to collect data in your project? Okay, it’s pretty straightforward.

Freedom-Centric Mobile: Librem 5 and 'Edge' postmarketOS

  • A Media Center in Your Pocket – Purism

    While the Librem 5 is a phone, it’s also a general-purpose computer. This allows the Librem 5 to act as a media center, game station, server, ultra-mobile PC, or whatever you can personally imagine.

  • postmarketOS in 2020-11: Edge & Donations

    Two weeks ago, a wlroots release was pushed to Alpine that caused Phosh to crash. This is a good example of things that can go wrong when using the edge channel of postmarketOS (as opposed to stable). The bug was reported to the postmarketOS issue tracker (precisely the right move!) and within the next eight hours until we could close that issue, it was pinned down to the wlroots 0.12.0 upgrade, Phosh developers were informed, log messages were analyzed but were not useful and eventually the "offending" commit was found with git bisect. It turned out that the commit was a feature and not a bug, it made wlroots terminate connections if some API protocol was not followed as intended whereas it would just ignore this previously. An issue was created in the Phosh tracker, and a patch was submitted to Alpine edge to revert that specific commit until Phosh follows that specific API as it was intended (likely soon). The story told above was certainly not worth writing a regular blog post about, it was so quickly resolved that if each time we dealt with issues like these it would be hard to find the proper blog posts among these edge breakage reports. But still, it would be nice if there was something like a second blog where people running postmarketOS edge can quickly find information about such issues while they are ongoing. The solution we arrived at is a second blog, which will only have such breakage reports from postmarketOS edge.