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today's howtos

Volla Phone Promises to Support Ubuntu Touch, Gets Kickstarter Campaign

Founded by Dr. Jörg Wurzer, an experienced entrepreneur with more than 20 years of experience in research and development in user experience, machine learning, natural language processing, artificial intelligence, and product management, Volla Phone promises to be a privacy-focused mobile phone powered by a free and open source operating system. At its heart, the Volla Phone device will use Nemo Mobile, an OS based on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) promising increased security and privacy features, as well as simplicity for the everyday user. For developers, Volla Phone also promises to support an alternative, free, and open-source operation system like Ubuntu Touch. Read more Also: Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS- Expected Release Date & More

Programming: DevNation, Python, RcppAnnoy and More

  • Plumbing Kubernetes CI/CD with Tekton

    Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists. In this session, Kamesh Sampath introduces Tekton, which is the Kubernetes-native way of defining and running CI/CD. Sampath explores the characteristics of Tekton—cloud-native, decoupled, and declarative—and shows how to combine various building blocks of Tekton to build and deploy a cloud-native application.

  • Coverage 5.0 beta 1

    I want to finish coverage.py 5.0. It has some big changes, so I need people to try it and tell me if it’s ready. Please install coverage.py 5.0 beta 1 and try it in your environment. I especially want to hear from you if you tried the earlier alphas of 5.0. There have been some changes in the SQLite database that were needed to make measurement efficient enough for large test suites, but that hinder ad-hoc querying.

  • How to get current date and time in Python?

    In this article, you will learn to get today's date and current date and time in Python. We will also format the date and time in different formats using strftime() method. There are a number of ways you can take to get the current date. We will use the date class of the datetime module to accomplish this task.

  • RcppAnnoy 0.0.14

    A new minor release of RcppAnnoy is now on CRAN, following the previous 0.0.13 release in September. RcppAnnoy is the Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik Bernhardsson. Annoy is a small and lightweight C++ template header library for very fast approximate nearest neighbours—originally developed to drive the famous Spotify music discovery algorithm. This release once again allows compilation on older compilers. The 0.0.13 release in September brought very efficient 512-bit AVX instruction to accelerate computations. However, this could not be compiled on older machines so we caught up once more with upstream to update to conditional code which will fall back to either 128-bit AVX or no AVX, ensuring buildability “everywhere”.

  • The Royal Mint eyes fresh IT talent to power digital drive

    The Royal Mint has been manufacturing coins for 1,100 years, originally from the Tower of London and, since 1967, from its current site in South Wales. Today, it is the world’s largest export mint, printing 3.3 billion coins and blanks a year, and now is looking to expand its digital reach to serve retail customers online.

  • Google plans to give slow websites a new badge of shame in Chrome

    A new badge could appear in the future that’s designed to highlight sites that are “authored in a way that makes them slow generally.” Google will look at historical load latencies to figure out which sites are guilty of slow load times and flag them, and the Chrome team is also exploring identifying sites that will load slowly based on device hardware or network connectivity.

  • Moving towards a faster web

    In the future, Chrome may identify sites that typically load fast or slow for users with clear badging. This may take a number of forms and we plan to experiment with different options, to determine which provides the most value to our users.

    Badging is intended to identify when sites are authored in a way that makes them slow generally, looking at historical load latencies. Further along, we may expand this to include identifying when a page is likely to be slow for a user based on their device and network conditions.

  • The Maturing of QUIC

    QUIC continues to evolve through a collaborative and iterative process at the IETF — of adding features, implementing them, evaluating them, reworking or discarding them because they don’t stand up to continued scrutiny, and refining them. And in doing so, QUIC has matured in more ways than we imagined, yielding a protocol that is remarkably different and substantially better than it was in the beginning. So, keeping your arms and legs inside the ride at all times, let us take you on this journey of how QUIC has gone from an early experiment to a standard poised to modernize the [Internet].

  • HEADS UP: ntpd changing [in OpenBSD]

    Probably after 6.7 we'll delete the warning. Maybe for 6.8 we'll remove -s and -S from getopt, and starting with those options will fail.

today's howtos