Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Huawei open-sources MindSpore, a framework for AI app development

    Huawei this week announced that MindSpore, a framework for AI app development the company detailed in August 2019, is now available in open source on GitHub and Gitee. The lightweight suite is akin to Google’s TensorFlow and Facebook’s PyTorch, and it scales across devices, edge, and cloud environments, ostensibly lowering the barrier to entry for developers looking to imbue apps with AI.

  • Open source approach for patients arriving at the clinic with Clinic Arrivals

    Video conferencing is being done through the open source OpenVidu, which means patients simply have to click on a link in the SMS and there are no apps to download.

    The SMS gateway is provided by Twilio, which lets users send and receive text messages using web service APIs.

    Mr Grieve said OpenVidu was deliberately chosen as unlike other free offerings, it does not require patients to sign up or be given an ID, and instead allows them to get straight to the appointment.

    “This is a link that takes them straight to a website and straight into the video call on the website,” he said. “There is zero impact on the patient's end and that was really important to me. There is no app, no set-up.”

  • ISTAT (Instituto Nazionale di Statistica) distributes, under the EUPL licence, their RELAIS toolkit.

    RELAIS (REcord Linkage At IStat) is a toolkit for dealing with record linkage projects.

    The purpose of record linkage is to identify the same real world entity that can be differently represented in multiple data sources, even if unique or common identifiers are not available or are affected by errors.

  • System Hackers meeting - Lyon edition

    For the 4th time, and less than 5 months after the last meeting, the FSFE System Hackers met in person to coordinate their activities, work on complex issues, and exchange know-how. This time, we chose yet another town familiar to one of our team members as venue – Lyon in France. What follows is a report of this gathering that happened shortly before #stayhome became the order of the day. For those who do not know this less visible but important team: The System Hackers are responsible for the maintenance and development of a large number of services. From the fsfe.org website’s deployment to the mail servers and blogs, from Git to internal services like DNS and monitoring, all these services, virtual machines and physical servers are handled by this friendly group that is always looking forward to welcoming new members. Interestingly, we have gathered in the same constellation as in the hackathon before, so Albert, Florian, Francesco, Thomas, Vincent and me tackled large and small challenges in the FSFE’s systems. But we have also used the time to exchange knowledge about complex tasks and some interconnected systems. The official part was conducted in the fascinating Astech Fablab, but word has it that Ninkasi, an excellent pub in Lyon, was the actual epicentre of this year’s meeting.

  • Your occasional enterprise storage digest, featuring Commvault, Nutanix, HYCU, MariaDB and more

    MariaDB has announced SkySQL database-as-a-service version of its eponymous software. SkySQL has a cloud-native architecture and uses Kubernetes for orchestration; ServiceNow for inventory, configuration and workflow management; Prometheus for real-time monitoring; and Grafana for visualization. It offers transaction and analytics support, with row, columnar, and combined row and columnar storage.

  • DataStax launches Kubernetes operator for open source Cassandra database

    Today, DataStax, the commercial company behind the open source Apache Cassandra project, announced an open source Kubernetes operator developed by the company to run a cloud native version of the database.

  • Didn't see that coming: DataStax emits open source Kubernetes operator for Cassandra

    NoSQL slinger DataStax has released an open source Kubernetes operator for Apache Cassandra as it seeks to cosy back up to the community. Fresh from snapping up Cassandra consultancy The Last Pickle for an undisclosed amount on 3 March, the veteran NoSQL biz has rounded out the month by opening up the source to its Kubernetes operator, replete with lessons learned from its forever-in-beta hosted Cassandra product, Astra (formerly Apollo.) Operators are one way to deal with the complexities of Kubernetes, abstracting (at least in theory) the user from the grungy bits of deploying and operating an application behind familiar Kubernetes tooling. Certainly, deploying and managing something like Cassandra in such an environment can be challenging enough without having to dive elbow-deep into the guts of thing.

Proprietary Stuff and Openwashing

  • WinRAR 5.90 Final Released For Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android

    WinRAR 5.90 Final has been released with numerous performance improvements and bug fixes for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. For those not familiar with WinRar, it is an archiving software from RARLAB that supports the ARJ, BZIP2, CAB, GZ, ISO, JAR, LHA, RAR, TAR, UUE, XZ, Z, ZIP, ZIPX, 7z, 001 (split) archive formats. WinRAR is distributed as trialware, which means that anyone can use it as a full-featured product before purchasing it.

  • GitLab is open sourcing 18 features for the DevOps lifecycle

    The DevOps tool GitLab offers paid and free versions, and now 18 additional features will be moved to the open source editions Core/Free. The developer community can contribute to the according issues and speed up the process—so now is the time to take a look and see which of the features you find most important.

  • HPE, Intel and Linux Foundation team up for open source software for 5G core

    HPE announced on Tuesday it's working with Intel and the Linux Foundation on a new open source software project to help automate the roll out of 5G across multiple sites. The new partnership, which will be under the Linux Foundation umbrella, is called the Open Distributed Infrastructure Management Framework. The partnership represents HPE's move into the 5G core network space as it branches out from its enterprise roots. Other partners for the open source project include AMI, Apstra, IBM's Red Hat, Tech Mahindra and World Wide Technology. HPE will also introduce an enterprise offering, the HPE Open Distributed Infrastructure Management Resource Aggregator.

  • What Value Does Alluxio Brings To The Presto Foundation?

    Steven Mih: The Presto Foundation is a project hosted under the Linux Foundation. It was created last year by companies like Facebook, Twitter, Alibaba and Uber. Alluxio is an open source project that is commonly used with Presto, the open source distributed SQL query engine, as well as other projects like Spark and TensorFlow. We support all these different frameworks. And since this was a foundation that was open to all, we decided to join it as one of the companies involved in that foundation.

  • Automating our Vanilla releases with GitHub actions

    Vanilla framework version 2.7.1 published at the end of February was the first fully automated release. Since then we have released two more and plan to release regular updates at least after every two-week iteration. The automated release process is not only smoother and takes less time, but also much less prone to human error. But there are still areas for possible improvements. With every major release, we are sending a newsletter describing the latest changes and additions to the Vanilla framework. This is still a very manual process that involves editing an email campaign template on MailChimp. Because the content of the email is loosely based on the release notes (that are already automated with Release Drafter), we could think of pre-populating the newsletter content with release notes. Instead of triggering the release manually using GitHub UI, we could automatically release (and publish) whenever the Vanilla version is updated in the package.json file. We already have similar workflows in place for our python packages.

Games: Kaleidogen, Suits: A Business RPG and More

  • Joachim Breitner: Animations in Kaleidogen

    A while ago I wrote a little game (or toy) called Kaleidogen. It is a relatively contemplative game where, starting from just unicolored disks, you combine abstract circular patterns to breed more interesting patterns. See my FARM 2019 talk for more details, or check out the source repository.

  • 'Suits: A Business RPG', a small indie comedy RPG has been updated with better Linux support

    Suits: A Business RPG is a mysterious comedy game that was released more than four years ago; from time to time it's being featured as part of Steam’s Weeklong Deals, as it is the case right now (50% discounted), so I’ve been looking into it for some time.

  • Struggling with regular expressions? Then visit 'Regex Crossword', a site to learn them through a Sudoku-like game

    The website features several sections to make the levels as varied as possible. There is also another area which includes levels made by other users, along with a stats page. Also, if you check the Help and FAQ section, you will be recommended other tools and online resources in case you want to learn a bit more about regexs. Don’t forget to use an account so that your progress on the levels can be saved. Finally, although this project is "something we do for fun", you can donate via PayPal or several cryptocurrencies (check the Help and FAQ section to see which ones are available) to help with hosting expenses and to keep ensuring further improvements and levels.

  • 'Tilesetter' is a program for developers that aims to optimize the tileset generation process; demo available

    Judging by the number of followers on their Twitter account and the user reviews on Steam, Tilesetter seems to embody the definition of “obscure”, but at the same time it must be remarked that except one, all of those reviews are positive and endorsed by a lot of other people, so while I’m not the indicated person to recommend you to use it or not (I’m not a developer), there are enough signs that would suggest this may be a particularly useful program to help you save a lot of time when creating your tilesets.

Devices With Arduino and Linux Support

  • Select a Geiger Counter for your Phone to Survive the next Nuclear Catastrophe

    It’s time to prepare! No, not for that COVID-19 thingie, it’s too late, but since 2020 has not started the best way we should prepare for all eventualities. It all started badly as I fell off my bicycle on New Year’s eve, and it went south from there, from talks of world war three in January, to the thread of a virus pandemic that could kill millions worldwide, to the start of the first global great depression. 2020 will be the “year of doom“, and we should expect massive earthquakes, once in a hundred-year megatsunami what will wipe entire cities, gigantic locust swarms in southern Europe, climate change induces, and leading famine, a couple of large asteroids hitting the hearth, and so on. But we should not forget the nuclear threat either via nuclear war or damaged nuclear reactors following natural disasters or terrorist attacks.

  • Edgeless EAI-Series Dual Arm Cortex-M4 MCU Features a 300 GOPS CNN-NPU

    Microcontrollers will have an important role to play in AIoT (AI + IoT) applications as they provide the lowest cost and power consumption. Performance is limited but we start seeing MCUs with AI accelerators such as GreenWaves GAP9 multi-core RISC-V microcontroller or Kendryte K210 RISC-V MCU with a KPU AI accelerator.

  • PCIe-enabled Intel 9th Gen computer uses water cooling

    Vecow’s Linux-friendly “RCX-1500W” edge AI computer cools its 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh chips and up to 4x PCIe cards with a water-cooling system. We rarely see liquid cooling systems on embedded computers because they tend to be complex, bulky, expensive, and must be carefully installed and maintained to avoid damage to the computer. Yet, embedded computers have never been so powerful and hot as the latest PCIe-enabled edge AI monsters that are in vogue these days. When you’re running high-powered graphics cards with Intel 8th or 9th Gen CPUs, you just may need to get a little wet.

  • Modular rolling stock computer is loaded with wireless

    Eurotech’s rugged, railway certified “BoltGate 20-31” transportation gateway runs Linux on an Apollo Lake SoC with standard LTE and GNSS, a choice of WiFi/BT or MVB, and optional expansion modules for GbE, storage, serial/CAN, DIO, and odometer. Eurotech announced an Intel Apollo Lake based “smart transportation” computer due in the second half of the year that follows its Bay Trail based BoltGATE 20-25 and BoltGATE 20-25 MVB. The new BoltGate 20-31 computer similarly offers modular expansion and EN50155 railway certification and targets rolling stock applications including passenger infotainment and entertainment, train-to-ground communications, and fleet management.

  • Kontron 3.5″-SBC-WLU Single Board Computer Takes CNVi M.2 WiFi Cards
  • DSTIKE ESP32 Watch Development Board Comes with OLED or TFT Display

    The watch can be programmed with Arduino core for ESP32 together with either ThingPulse OLED library or Arduino library for the ST7789 IPS SPI display depending on the model, and Adafruit Neopixel library. Also refer to the example sketches for the OLED display and TFT display.