Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware: Arduino, EasyOS for the Pi. and More

  • Arduino Blog » This Arduino-based speed bag counts your punches

    Creator DuctTapeMechanic loves sports and electronics, so for a recent project he decided to combine his two passions by hacking a speed bag to keep track of his punches. As shown in the video below, the first step was to get it physically set up, modding an old metal bed frame into a support structure. He also added a recessed NPN capacitive sensor to pick up when the bag hits the back of the platform. The sensor sends “hit” signals to an Arduino Uno via a PC817 optocoupler. The board then counts punches and displays the number of hits on an LCD screen mounted just above eye level.

  • Arduino MKR inspired MKR Windy board is equipped with STM32WL LoRa SoC

    We recently wrote about MKR SharkyPro BLE, Zigbee, OpenThread development board based on STM32WB55 MCU and following Arduino MKR form factor, but it turns out Midatronics has also launched a similar-looking board with LoRa connectivity. MKR Windy board features the company’s Windy STM32WL module with an uFL connector and following the same Arduino MKR layout.

  • EasyOS Dunfell 2.6 released for the Raspberry Pi4

    EasyOS, compiled for an aarch64 (64-bit ARM) CPU, with 5.10.4 Linux kernel, compiled entirely from source in a port of the Dunfell release of OpenEmbedded, is available for the Raspberry Pi4. Version number is 2.6, but this is the first release for the Pi. EasyOS for the Pi4 might be a bit beta-quality in places, but overall quite a nice experience. The "beta bits" I will of course keep working on -- as there is an "update" icon on the desktop, it will be easy-peasy to update. Write the image to a good-quality and fast microSD-card (Class 10) or USB-stick (example: SanDisk Ultra), at least 8GB so that you have plenty of space for anything in the future. Though, a minimum of 2GB will work. As to the host board, even a Pi3B with 1GB RAM will work, or rather "just work" -- I recommend at least a Pi4 with 2GB RAM -- I have the 8GB RAM board.

  • Managing Edge IoT Linux Devices Closely, Remotely, Securely

    With the recent shift from Real-Time Operating Systems (RTOS) to Linux-based embedded systems, there has been a boom in the IoT industry in creativity and expandability and opened doors to a whole new level of automation. Unlike the previous generation of IoT devices which followed the “program once, use forever” concept, with the new developments in the IoT industry, mainly the devices based on Linux operating systems that demand more and more flexibility, accessibility, and control. It has been challenging to address all these points at once when it comes to remote monitoring and control of these devices; especially if one produces thousands of those smart devices to be sold worldwide. The ability to manage these connected devices (Raspberry Pi, Jetson Nano, or any SOM/SBC that runs a flavor of Linux such as Yocto based, Ubuntu or Debian, etc.) through a single platform, be it just one device, a dozen, or maybe a couple thousand would prove to be immensely productive when considering both the time and cost it’d otherwise take to manage them individually.

Kernel: New Stable Releases and Hardware Support, Atomics Support in eBPF

  • Linux 5.10.9
  • Linux 5.4.91
  • Linux 4.19.169
  • Linux is Finally on Apple M1...Kind Of.

    Half of the reason to buy a Mac is to get native support for macOS, but that doesn’t mean Mac owners don’t also suffer from the grass-is-greener syndrome. While Apple’s operating system is known for being casual friendly and is also the OS system people who grew up on its products might be more familiar with, PC users are always quick to point out that the extra steps it adds to actions like installing programs can slow down more serious work. It’s currently possible to emulate Windows for ARM on Apple’s latest M1 Macs, but what if you want to take your power user cred a step further and use Linux on your new M1 Mac?

  • Pioneer DJM-750 DJ Mixer Handling For Linux Is En Route - Phoronix

    With Linux 5.11 came Pioneer DDJ-RR DJ controller support while for Linux 5.12 additional Pioneer DJ equipment will be supported. The latest Pioneer DJ kit to be supported by the Linux kernel is the Pioneer DJM-750 digital audio mixer. The Pioneer DJM-750 is a 4-channel mixer with built-in 24-bit / 96 kHz USB sound card and the same 32-bit DSP found in Pioneer's higher end models like the DJM-900NXS.

  • 2021 Could Be The Year That AMD Radeon Graphics Can Hot Unplug Gracefully On Linux - Phoronix

    It's been nearly one year that AMDGPU patches have been around to better handle GPU hot unplugging on Linux. The use-case for that being either removal via sysfs such as if then assigning the GPU to a VM or for external GPUs such as connected via Thunderbolt. Those patches are still baking but the latest iteration of the work has now been published by AMD. Currently the hot removal of AMD Radeon GPUs under Linux can result in a kernel oops or system hangs or application hangs, among related headaches. Reportedly, Windows doesn't handle the GPU hot-unplug situation much better.

  • Linux 5.12 To Add Atomics Support To The Promising eBPF - Phoronix

    The eBPF in-kernel virtual machine that allows for handling sandboxed "programs" within the Linux kernel continues on its stellar upward trajectory. eBPF remains one of the most exciting and revolutionary changes in recent years within the Linux kernel and new features continue to be tacked on to allow eBPF to fulfill more roles than the original BPF network packet filter use-case. Should you not be too familiar with eBPF, learn more on the technology at eBPF.io.

GNOME 40 Will Now Handle XWayland On-Demand By Default

Back in 2019 support was added to GNOME 3.34 to allow starting XWayland on-demand. With this opt-in feature, XWayland support would only be started up when needed (on-demand) for running X11 clients. That support has now matured enough where for the upcoming GNOME 40 it will be enabled by default. As of today in Mutter 40 is the enabling by default of the XWayland on-demand handling. This comes following a more robust check for helping to ensure X11 clients are no longer active prior to terminating XWayland. That plus other work now allows it to be enabled by default. Read more

Games: Bugs Under Ubuntu, Godot Showcase (Resolutiion), and Volcanoids

  • Embarrassing Bugs

    Well, this is embarrassing! I recently filed a bug against an open source project because I genuinely thought it was broken. It was (almost, probably, entirely) my fault. I thought I’d fess up and explain what happened. It might be useful for others. As I mentioned yesterday, I recently upgraded my Ubuntu machines, including my main desktop. It’s a funky Skull Canyon NUC with a weird hybrid Intel / AMD GPU setup and an external nVidia card in an enclosure. [...] Well, this is embarrassing! I recently filed a bug against an open source project because I genuinely thought it was broken. It was (almost, probably, entirely) my fault. I thought I’d fess up and explain what happened. It might be useful for others. As I mentioned yesterday, I recently upgraded my Ubuntu machines, including my main desktop. It’s a funky Skull Canyon NUC with a weird hybrid Intel / AMD GPU setup and an external nVidia card in an enclosure.

  • Godot Showcase - Resolutiion developer Monolith of Minds talks about their experience

    Welcome to the second developer interview following the introduction of the new Showcase page! This week, we've interviewed Monolith of Minds about their latest game Resolutiion.

  • Steampunk survival game Volcanoids has a huge combat upgrade | GamingOnLinux

    Stuck on an island where the volcano is erupting constantly, Volcanoids is an interesting setting for a survival game that gives you a big moving drill for a base. After sticking in co-op to the Early Access game a while back, the team at Volcanoid (yes the team is named like the game), have now boosted the combat in the game to make it actually a lot more interesting. To say this is a huge update would be quite the understatement. They added in aiming down sights, weapon recoil, bullet drop and spread, hit indicators, actual projectiles (no hit scans), lots of new animations, new guns and…you get the idea. [...] For me it's probably one of the most exciting open-world survival games (next to Valheim) supported on Linux.