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Five Open Source alternatives to Slack

Like Slack, Riot allows you to chat, exchange files, make voice calls, hold video conferences, and work with some bots. The application is developed on the Matrix platform. That has two significant advantages in terms of security and privacy. The data gets store in a private server, and conversations are end-to-end encrypted. Riot allows it to be installed for free on the servers of any company. Although those interested can also contract it as a managed hosting service. Like Slack, it also has open APIs that allow its integration in a good number of applications, like instant messaging standouts. Riot has support for both the leading desktop platforms (Windows, macOS, Linux) and mobile (iOS, Android) and web version. Read more

GitLab Liberates More Code

  • 18 GitLab features are moving to open source

    I spent some time reviewing GitLab features and determined that, by our Buyer-Based Open Core model, eighteen features that appear in seven different stages of the DevOps lifecycle ought to be open source.

  • GitLab Shifts 18 Features Into Core Open Source Platform

    GitLab this week announced it has moved 18 features that previously organizations had to pay for into the core open source version of its namesake continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) platform.

  • GitLab asks customers to help it open source a raft of features

    GitLab is open sourcing 18 features that were previously only available to its paying users, after CEO Sid Sijbrandij apparently personally audited all the Dev-X-Ops platform’s pricing tiers. The newly opened up features range across the development lifecycle, from Plan and Create, through Verify, Package, Release, Configure and Defend. But if you’re itching to get your hands on the features, there’s a catch – the company would like you to help out with the hands-on labour of actually delivering them.

  • GitLab is open sourcing 18 features for the DevOps lifecycle

    The DevOps tool GitLab offers paid and free versions, and now 18 additional features will be moved to the open source editions Core/Free. The developer community can contribute to the according issues and speed up the process—so now is the time to take a look and see which of the features you find most important. Sid Sijbrandij, co-founder and CEO of GitLab Inc., has announced that 18 Gitlab features will move to the open source editions Core/Free. Pull requests have been created for moving each of the features, and the developer community is encouraged to take part in the process.

  • GitLab moves 18 of its DevOps features to open source

    GitLab announced that 18 of its features are moving to open source including related issues, export issues, issue board focus mode, and service desk. “This marks a major milestone in our efforts to empower the community to collaborate more robustly and to take our single tool for the DevOps lifecycle to the next level,” Sid Sijbrandij, co-founder and CEO of GitLab wrote in a blog post. The newly open-sourced feature set covers areas that span planning, creating, verifying, packaging, releasing, configuring, and defending. The work to move the actual code to the open-source part of the codebase is defined in issues that are linked from this blog post by GitLab.

'Open Source' Response to COVID-19

  • Govt to top institutes: offer open source courses, e-learning modules

    The human resource development (HRD) ministry has asked top higher educational institutions, including the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs), to create e-learning modules for their own use and open source courses to help the larger education ecosystem. The ministry has asked them to adopt credit transfer to bring cohesion among institutions, and make online and offline education seamless, as the world battles the covid-19 pandemic.

  • Engineer Responds to Call with Open-Source, DIY Face Shield

    Like many hospitals and clinics around the country, UW Health in Madison, Wisconsin is facing a shortage of face shields stemming from supply chains challenged by the ongoing COVID-19 threat. However, unlike other communities, UW Health has Lennon Rodgers. Rodgers is the director of the Engineering Design Innovation Lab at the University of Wisconsin. When he received an urgent email asking about his ability to produce 1,000 face shields for UW staff, he went to work. His story was recently chronicled by Wired.com.

  • Designers pitch in to make open-source face shields

    It took less than a week for the director of the University Kansas Center for Design Research and some of his former students and colleagues to crank out an open-source design for a plastic face shield to help protect health care workers battling the COVID-19 pandemic. In just a few days, it has been freely downloaded around the world more than 4,500 times. And 10,000 of the shields already produced locally will soon be available to caregivers in The University of Kansas Health System. What’s more, almost anyone, anywhere with a computer-aided router and a common type of plastic sheeting can rapidly produce more of them.

  • An Open-Source Solution to Get E-Passes During Lockdown Online

    With a 21-day lockdown being imposed across India and the police using excessive force in certain cases to implement a curfew, there is a need to get valid passes as easily as possible to ensure essential services keep functioning during the COVID-19 pandemic. [...] The solution, according to a memo sent out by Sharad Sharma, co-founder iSPIRT, is a software app its volunteers developed in just 72 hours - Anumati. Here's what the app proposes by way of simplifying how to get passes.

Eclipse Theia 1.0

  • The Eclipse Foundation Releases Eclipse Theia 1.0, a True Open Source Alternative to Visual Studio Code
  • Eclipse Releases Open Source Alternative to Visual Studio Code [Ed: Why does everything need to be described in terms of what it is or they are to Microsoft?]

    The Eclipse Foundation has released Eclipse Theia 1.0, which it is promoting as "a true open source alternative" to Microsoft's lightweight Visual Studio Code (VS Code) source code editor. An extensible platform for building multi-language desktop and Web-based IDEs from the same codebase, Theia was started in 2016 as a project by Ericsson and TypeFox, and it became an Eclipse project in 2019. It's now one of the projects in the Eclipse Cloud Development Tools Working Group (ECD WG), an industry collaboration focused on delivering development tools for and in the cloud.

  • Eclipse Theia 1.0 is an open source alternative to VS Code

    The Eclipse Foundation, one of the leading global voices advancing open source software, released Eclipse Theia version 1.0. Intended to be a completely open source alternative to Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code, Eclipse Theia supports multiple languages and combines some of the best features of IDEs into one extensible platform. If the name rings any bells, the Theia project previously began elsewhere. It was initially created by Ericsson and TypeFox (founders of Gitpod and Xtext) in 2016 and moved to The Eclipse Foundation in May of 2018. To celebrate this milestone, explore some of its stand-out features and see what sets it apart from VS Code.

  • Eclipse Releases Theia - Open Source VSCode Alternative

    The Eclipse Foundation has released Theia, described as a true open source alternative to Microsoft’s popular Visual Studio Code. Theia is an extensible platform to develop multi-language Cloud and Desktop IDEs. Theia has been designed to give is an extensible platform to develop multi-language Cloud and Desktop IDE-like products for developers.The project team says it means that as an adopter you don't need to make an upfront decision about whether your new developer product should run in the cloud, on the desktop, or both.