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Programming Literature: Jussi Pakkanen on Meson, Shing Lyu on Rust and "25 Best JavaScript Books for Newbie and Professional"

  • Jussi Pakkanen: Meson manual sales status and price adjustment

    The second part (marked with a line) indicates when I was a guest on CppCast talking about Meson and the book. As an experiment I created a time limited discount coupon so that all listeners could buy it with €10 off. As you can tell from the graph it did have an immediate response, which again proves that marketing and visibility are the things that actually matter when trying to sell any product. After that we have the "new normal", which means no sales at all. I don't know if this is caused by the coronavirus isolation or whether this is the natural end of life for the product (hopefully the former but you can never really tell in advance).

  • Shing Lyu: Lessons learned in writing my first book

    You might have noticed that I didn’t update this blog frequently in the past year. It’s not because I’m lazy, but I focused all my creative energy on writing this book: Practical Rust Projects. The book is now available on Apress, Amazon and O’Reilly. In this post, I’ll share some of the lessons I learned in writing this book. Although I’ve been writing Rust for quite a few years, I haven’t really studied the internals of the Rust language itself. Many of the Rust enthusiasts whom I know seem to be having much fun appreciating how the language is designed and built. But I take more joy in using the language to build tangible things. Therefore, I’ve been thinking about writing a cookbook-style book on how to build practical projects with Rust, ever since I finished the video course Building Reusable Code with Rust. Out of my surprise, I received an email from Steve Anglin, an acquisition editor from Apress, in April 2019. He initially asked me to write a book on the RustPython project. But the project was still growing rapidly thanks to the contributors. I’ve already lost grip on the overall architecture, so I can’t really write much about it. So I proposed the topic I have in mind to Steve. Fortunately, the editorial board accepted my proposal, and we decided to write two books: one for general Rust projects and one for web-related Rust projects. Since this is my first time writing a book that will be published in physical form (or as The Rust Book put it, “dead tree form”), I learned quite a lot throughout the process. Hopefully, these points will help you if you are considering or are already writing your own book.

  • The 25 Best JavaScript Books for Newbie and Professional

    JavaScript is a programming language that is object-oriented and used to make dynamic web pages by adding interactive effects. This client-side scripting language is used by almost 94.5% web pages available on the internet. The language is very easy but also known as one of the most misunderstood programming languages. You should choose the right guidelines so that you can get all the answers to your questions related to JavaScript. Here we will provide you with a list of the best Javascript books so that you can learn JavaScript and never become confused.

today's howtos

This is my shoestring photography setup for image editing

Saving money is not the only major benefit of using inexpensive hardware and free open-source software. Somewhat surprisingly, the more important benefit for me personally is peace of mind. My primary machine is a 9-year old ThinkPad X220 with 4GB RAM and 120GB SSD. I bought it on eBay for around 200 euros, plus about 30 euros for a 120GB SSD. The digiKam application I use for most of my photo management and processing needs cost exactly zero. (I’m the author of the digiKam Recipes book.) I store my entire photo library on a USB 3.0 3TB Toshiba Canvio hard disk I bought for around 113 euros. If any component of my hardware setup fails, I can replace it without any significant impact on my budget. I don’t have to worry about a company deciding to squeeze more money out of me by either forcing me into a paid upgrade or a subscription plan, and I sleep better knowing that I own the software crucial for my photographic workflow. You might think that managing and processing RAW files and photos on a relatively old machine with a paltry amount of RAM is unbearably slow, but it’s not. While Windows would bring the ThinkPad X220 to its knees, the machine briskly runs openSUSE Linux with the KDE graphical desktop environment. The word Linux may send some photographers away screaming, but a modern Linux system is hardly more complicated in use than Windows. Read more

elementary OS: Hera Updates for March, 2020

Fresh on the heels of the AppCenter for Everyone Remote Sprint, we still managed to push out a good amount of updates over the course of March (and early April), bundled up in an OS 5.1.3 update. Let’s dive into what’s new. We continued our quest to make Code the best editor for elementary OS this month. A file’s Git status now shows in its tooltip in the project sidebar, making it easier to understand what the status icons mean—especially if you’re colorblind or just don’t remember. We also added an option for explicit case-sensitive find/replace for those times when you want to find or replace the word foo but not Foo. Read more Also: elementary OS 5.1.3 New Features Revealed