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This is my shoestring photography setup for image editing

Saving money is not the only major benefit of using inexpensive hardware and free open-source software. Somewhat surprisingly, the more important benefit for me personally is peace of mind. My primary machine is a 9-year old ThinkPad X220 with 4GB RAM and 120GB SSD. I bought it on eBay for around 200 euros, plus about 30 euros for a 120GB SSD. The digiKam application I use for most of my photo management and processing needs cost exactly zero. (I’m the author of the digiKam Recipes book.) I store my entire photo library on a USB 3.0 3TB Toshiba Canvio hard disk I bought for around 113 euros. If any component of my hardware setup fails, I can replace it without any significant impact on my budget. I don’t have to worry about a company deciding to squeeze more money out of me by either forcing me into a paid upgrade or a subscription plan, and I sleep better knowing that I own the software crucial for my photographic workflow. You might think that managing and processing RAW files and photos on a relatively old machine with a paltry amount of RAM is unbearably slow, but it’s not. While Windows would bring the ThinkPad X220 to its knees, the machine briskly runs openSUSE Linux with the KDE graphical desktop environment. The word Linux may send some photographers away screaming, but a modern Linux system is hardly more complicated in use than Windows. Read more

elementary OS: Hera Updates for March, 2020

Fresh on the heels of the AppCenter for Everyone Remote Sprint, we still managed to push out a good amount of updates over the course of March (and early April), bundled up in an OS 5.1.3 update. Let’s dive into what’s new. We continued our quest to make Code the best editor for elementary OS this month. A file’s Git status now shows in its tooltip in the project sidebar, making it easier to understand what the status icons mean—especially if you’re colorblind or just don’t remember. We also added an option for explicit case-sensitive find/replace for those times when you want to find or replace the word foo but not Foo. Read more Also: elementary OS 5.1.3 New Features Revealed

Kaidan 0.5.0 released!

After more than half a year the next release is here, but the waiting was worth it! It includes the all new onboarding, which aims at better usability for new XMPP users and improved security, while minimizing additional effort by the user. For further information look at the blog post dedicated to this topic. And even more! Now recording and sending audio and video is possible with Kaidan, as well as searching for contacts and messages. Additionally, many smaller features and fixes are included in this release. But have a look at the changelog yourself. We sadly have to inform you that we encountered difficulties building Kaidan for Windows and building the Flatpak as one option to use Kaidan on Linux. But we are already working on fixing it and Kaidan 0.5 will hopefully be available on Windows and as a Flatpak for Linux soon™. Read more

Chrome OS Terminal App Gains New Features, Makes Working with Linux Easier

As spotted by the focally-blessed hawks at Android Police, Chrome OS 83 (currently on the developer channel) ships with an updated terminal app boasts a solid set of welcome new features. If you’re unfamiliar with it, the Chrome OS terminal app is available to users of Chrome OS on compatible Chromebooks who opt-in to the Linux (beta) feature. The feature (through the power of containers) provides a full Linux development environment in which they can apt install popular open software like GIMP, LibreOffice, and, yes, even Mozilla Firefox on a Chromebook and run them alongside other software, native software. Read more