Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Linux and FOSS Events

  • 33C3 - Event Report
    I recently had the opportunity to attend the 33rd Chaos Communication Congress (33C3). The event, as its name suggests, was chaotic. Let me give you two hints: twelve thousand (12000) participants, plus twenty-four (24) hours unrestricted access to the venue.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference returns to MIT this weekend, March 25-26
    LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. LibrePlanet 2017 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels. In accordance with the theme "The Roots of Freedom," the conference's sessions will examine the roots of the free software movement, including the Four Freedoms, the GNU General Public License and copyleft, and the community's focus on security and privacy protections. Other sessions will explore new ideas and current work that has arisen from those roots, reaching in to activism, the arts, business, and education. Keynote speakers include Kade Crockford, Director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, special consultant to the Electronic Frontier Foundation and author Cory Doctorow, Changeset Consulting founder Sumana Harihareswara, and Free Software Foundation founder and president Richard Stallman.
  • ZTE’s Approach to Digital Transformation with Software-Defined Networking
    The dawn of new services such as 5G, IoT, AR/VR, e-commerce, connected cars,and more, is driving us to digitalization -- a massive transition that also requires the network to change.
  • Easier Persistent Memory Programming with Extensions to libstdc++ and libc++
    Persistent memory, unlike volatile memory, retains its contents even if the server has a power failure. However, as Tomasz Kapela, Software Engineer at Intel, points out during his LinuxCon Europe 2016 talk, persistent memory is hard to achieve. Since persistent memory programming is non-trivial, they have been focused on making it easier for the end user and for applications to use persistent memory correctly.
  • Persistent Memory Extensions to libstdc++/libc++ by Tomasz Kapela, Intel

Development News: GitLab 9.0, CRAN, and 2038 Bug

  • GitLab 9.0 released with Subgroups and Deploy Boards
    Today we are releasing GitLab 9.0, 18 months after releasing 8.0. We've made significant advances to GitLab during this period, shipping a version every single month on the 22nd. Let's quickly recap how far we've come since 8.0, and see those features dovetailing into today's 9.0 release. Or jump ahead to 9.0 features.
  • Suggests != Depends
    A number of packages on CRAN use Suggests: casually.
  • 2038: only 21 years away
    Sometimes it seems that things have gone relatively quiet on the year-2038 front. But time keeps moving forward, and the point in early 2038 when 32-bit time_t values can no longer represent times correctly is now less than 21 years away. That may seem like a long time, but the relatively long life cycle of many embedded systems means that some systems deployed today will still be in service when that deadline hits. One of the developers leading the effort to address this problem is Arnd Bergmann; at Linaro Connect 2017 he gave an update on where that work stands. That work, he said, is proceeding on three separate fronts, the first of which is the kernel itself. He has been working for the last five years to try to prepare the kernel for 2038. Much of that work involves converting 32-bit timestamps to 64-bit values, even on 32-bit systems. Some 32-bit timestamps also show up in the user-space API, which complicates the issue considerably. There is a plan for the enhancement of the user-space API with 2038-clean versions of the problematic system calls, but it has not yet gotten upstream. One recent exception is the statx() system call, which was merged for 4.11; statx() will serve as the year-2038-capable version of the stat() family of calls. There are quite a few other system calls still needing 2038-clean replacements, though.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Customer security awareness: alerting you to vulnerabilities that are of real risk
  • Cisco's WikiLeaks Security Vulnerability Exposure: 10 Things Partners Need To Know
    Cisco's security team has discovered that hundreds of its networking devices contain a vulnerability that could allow attackers to remotely executive malicious code and take control of the affected device. "We are committed to responsible disclosure, protecting our customers, and building the strongest security architecture and products that are designed through our Trustworthy Systems initiatives," said a Cisco spokesperson in an email to CRN regarding the vulnerability. Some channel partners of the San Jose, Calif.-based networking giant are already advising customers on how to bypass the critical security flaw. Here are 10 important items that Cisco channel partners should know about the security vulnerability.
  • Linux had a killer flaw for 11 years and no one noticed
    One of the key advantages of Open sauce software is that it is supposed to be easier to spot and fix software flaws, however Linux has had a local privilege escalation flaw for 11 years and no-one has noticed. The vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2017-6074, is over 11 years old and was likely introduced in 2005 when the Linux kernel gained support for the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP). It was discovered last week and was patched by the kernel developers on Friday.
  • 6 Hot Internet of Things (IoT) Security Technologies
  • Microsoft Losing Its Edge

    However, despite these improvements in code cleanness and security technologies, it hasn’t quite proven itself when faced with experienced hackers at contests such as Pwn2Own. At last year’s edition of Pwn2Own, Edge proved to be a little better than Internet Explorer and Safari, but it still ended up getting hacked twice, while Chrome was only partially hacked once.

    Things seem to have gotten worse, rather than better, for Edge. At this year’s Pwn2Own, Microsoft’s browser was hacked no less than five times.

  • Microsoft loses the Edge at hacking contest

    And for every hack perpetrated against Edge, there was a corresponding attack against the Windows 10 kernel, indicating that it has a way to go in terms of security, according to Tom's Hardware.

  • Wikileaks: Apple, Microsoft and Google must fix CIA exploits within 90 days

    The 90-day deadline is the same that Google's own Project Zero security group provides to companies when it uncovers flaws in their software. If a company has failed to patch its software accordingly, Project Zero publishes details of the flaw whether the vendor likes it or not.

  • NTPsec Project announces 0.9.7

Android Leftovers

  • Build Android Apps on Debian using Only Debian Packages
    If you’re an Android developer who prefers to use a Debian machine for home or work, then you may be interested in a guide published by the official Debian blog on how to build Android applications using ONLY Debian packages. At this time, you can build applications only if it targets API Level 23 with build-tools-24 as these are the only versions that are completely Debian at the time of this writing.
  • VAIO's slick metal Windows Phone is resurrected for Android
    VAIO, freed from the Sony yoke, made one ropey-looking Android phone all on its own. Then, learning several lessons, it made a gorgeous, machined slab of aluminum that, unfortunately, ran Windows Phone 10. Now, like practically all other phone makers, its changing tack, introducing the VAIO Phone A: an identical phone that's running Android 6.0.
  • Sony now has to compete against VAIO's new Android phone
    Sony sold off its PC-focused VAIO division back in 2014, but the brand lived on under new management. Now, it’s come back to haunt the tech giant in the mobile market, with a new Android-powered VAIO handset announced today — the VAIO Phone A.
  • How To Install Kali Linux On Android Using Linux Deploy
    Kali Linux for Android: Kali Linux is best operating system for Ethical hackers. It is used by white hat hackers, security researchers and pentesters. Kali Linux come up with the advance features which is beneficial for security purposes . Kali Linux is high software and cannot run in all devices. It is available for limited devices only. But now you can install Kali Linux in Android device, Because of developers of Linux Deploy it is possible to get Linux distributions installed in a chroot using GUI builder. let’s start and learn how to install kali linux on any android.
  • An Android Phone Makes A Better Server Than You’d Think
    There was a time a few years ago when the first Android phones made it to market, that they seemed full of promise as general purpose computers. Android is sort of Linux, right, or so the story went, so of course you must be able to run Linux on an Android phone and do all sorts of cool stuff with it. As anyone who tried to root an Android phone from 2010 will tell you, it was a painful and unrewarding process. There was normally a convoluted rooting process followed by somehow squeezing your own Linux filesystem tree onto the device, then chroot-ing into it. You’d then have to set up a VNC server and VNC into it, and eventually you’d feel immensely proud of your very slow tiny-screen Linux desktop that you’d slaved over creating. It was one of those things that’s simple in theory, but extremely convoluted in practice.
  • Android Candy: That App Is for the Birds!
  • New details on the Android O Developer Preview
  • Android O brings fun customizations that set the stage for bigger changes
    The Android O developer preview just dropped, and we’ve been poking around to see what’s new with the latest version. So far, it’s hard to judge the new features on Android O since most require app developers to update their code, but some digging does show tons of interesting settings that hint at what’s to come.
  • Amazon Alexa comes to its first Android phone
  • What do you think Android O stands for? (The 3:59, Ep. 198)