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OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.

Linux Graphics

  • Intrinsic Is A Promising, Open-Source, Cross-Platform Vulkan Game Engine
    Ever hear of the Intrinsic game engine? Neither have we, until The Khronos Group mentioned it this morning as a new game engine focused on Vulkan support that was open-sourced last week. Intrinsic is an open-source cross-platform graphics and game engine that's designed around Vulkan. Intrinsic is still in the early stages of development but the visuals from it so far appear quite good. The game engine is actually GPLv3 licensed but the developer is also making it available for proprietary purposes through private means.
  • Mesa 13.0 RC2 Released With ANV, RADV, Wayland Fixes
    The latest Mesa 13.0 weekly release candidate is now available for testing.
  • Second Mesa 13.0.0 3D Graphics Library RC Out Now, Final Could Launch October 28
    Today, October 24, 2016, Emil Velikov, a software release engineer working for Collabora, announced the availability of the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Mesa 3D 13.0.0 Graphics Library. The development cycle of the major Mesa 3D Graphics Library 13.0.0 branch, due for release later this month, on the 28th of October, started last week, on October 19, with the Release Candidate 1 milestone. And today, we're able to test drive the second RC build, which introduces even more bug fixes and improvements.
  • LLGL Aims To Be Abstraction Layer For OpenGL, Direct3D 11/12 & Vulkan
    One of my "hobbies" when news is light and there isn't any fun/new/exciting hardware keeping me busy on a given weekend is checking out the various Vulkan projects on GitHub. It's been great seeing all of the independent graphics renderers/engines being tried by different individuals, tons of different Vulkan samples, and a lot of other innovative projects around Vulkan, many of which I've written about in the past few months on Phoronix. One of the projects I see being regularly updated when checking on weekends and haven't written about yet is LLGL, the Low-Level Graphics Library.

Games for GNU/Linux