Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Truffle Hog Finds Security Keys Hidden in GitHub Code
    According to commentors on a Reddit thread about Truffle Hog, Amazon Web Services has already been using a similar tool for the same purpose. "I have accidentally committed my AWS secret keys before to a public repo," user KingOtar wrote. "Amazon actually found them and shut down my account until I created new ones. Kinda neat Amazon."
  • 5 Essential Tips for Securing Your WordPress Sites
    WordPress is by far the most popular blogging platform today. Being as popular as it is, it comes with its own strengths and weaknesses. The very fact that almost everybody uses it, makes it more prone to vulnerabilities. WordPress developers are doing a great job of fixing and patching the framework as new flaws are discovered, but that doesn’t mean that you can simply install and forget your installation. In this post, we will provide some of the most common ways of securing and strengthening a WordPress site.
  • Google ventures into public key encryption
    Google announced an early prototype of Key Transparency, its latest open source effort to ensure simpler, safer, and secure communications for everyone. The project’s goal is to make it easier for applications services to share and discover public keys for users, but it will be a while before it's ready for prime time. Secure communications should be de rigueur, but it remains frustratingly out of reach for most people, more than 20 years after the creation of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP). Existing methods where users need to manually find and verify the recipients’ keys are time-consuming and often complicated. Messaging apps and file sharing tools are limited in that users can communicate only within the service because there is no generic, secure method to look up public keys.
  • How to Keep Hackers out of Your Linux Machine Part 2: Three More Easy Security Tips
    In part 1 of this series, I shared two easy ways to prevent hackers from eating your Linux machine. Here are three more tips from my recent Linux Foundation webinar where I shared more tactics, tools and methods hackers use to invade your space. Watch the entire webinar on-demand for free.

Games for GNU/Linux

Linux and Graphics

Zorin OS 12 "Core"

Zorin 12 Core is available in 32-bit and 64-bit x86 builds and the ISO we download is 1.5GB in size. Booting from this downloaded image launches a graphical environment. A window appears and asks if we would like to try Zorin's live desktop environment or launch the project's system installer. We can select our preferred language at this time from a list of languages on the left side of the window. At the bottom of the window is a link to the project's release notes and clicking this link opens a web browser to display the on-line document. Something I found odd was that when I clicked the link to display Zorin's release notes, the web browser worked. It opened as expected and brought up the desired information. However, when I opted to try exploring Zorin's live desktop environment, I found the one application which did not launch was the Chromium web browser. When attempting to open the browser from the application menu, nothing would happen. When trying to launch Chromium from a virtual terminal, the terminal would hang, neither opening the browser nor returning me to a command prompt and no errors were displayed. Read more