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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Module and dev kit unleash TI’s AM65x

Mistral’s “AM65x Industrial SoM” module runs Linux or Android on a quad -A53 TI AM6548 with support for TSN and industrial Ethernet protocols. Features include up to 4GB DDR4 and 32GB eMMC and a dev kit with 3x GbE ports. Bangalore, India based Mistral has released a Linux-ready compute module and development kit that showcases Texas Instruments’ 1.1GHz, quad-core Cortex-A53 Sitara AM6548. This is only the second AM65x based product we’ve seen after Phytec’s phyCore-AM65x SOM. Read more

IBM, UN and Linux Foundation tackle climate crisis in 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge

For its 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge, IBM has partnered with United Nations Human Rights and the Linux Foundation to invite software developers and innovators worldwide to help fight climate change with open source powered technology. "IBM has a long history of taking on the world's biggest challenges and we cannot think of a greater one today than climate change ," said IBM's Daniel Krook, chief technology officer for IBM's Call for Code. Read more

Distributions Were For Linux, Not For Kubernetes

I often liken the Kubernetes revolution and the way it's taking over the cloud to Linux/Unix and the way it took over servers. I think we're right at the beginning of the same kind of revolution, and I'm not the only one who is seeing this trend, as evidenced by so many companies cropping up to capitalize on its growth. Companies looking to make money in the world of Linux went out and took the core, bundled it up with their best practices and their favorite applications, and then sold it as a "distribution." You see this with Red Hat Linux, Ubuntu, etc. — even the open-source versions took the base system and then built significantly above and beyond that to the point where each had its own default windowing interface, and some were massively different experiences for the user even though what was underneath was basically the same. Read more