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Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS

  • JS package catalog npm frees its team software for open source devs
    npm Inc, the company behind the Node.js package manager and command-line utility known by the same three letters, on Wednesday plans to make its developer collaboration tool known as Orgs free for open source projects. Those using npm to manage private packages still have to pay. "This lets us decouple the paid features from the team management features," said npm cofounder Isaac Schlueter in a phone interview with The Register. Orgs, or Organizations, depending upon where one looks on the inconsistent npm website, costs $7 per month per user. There's also a sensible requirement for at least two users. Otherwise it's not much of an organization.
  • A new (slow) open source JPEG algorithm makes images 35% smaller and looks better than older compression systems
    Guetzli is Google's new free/open JPEG compression algorithm, which produces images that are more than a third smaller in terms of byte-size, and the resulting images are consistently rated as more attractive than traditionally compressed JPEGs. It's something of a web holy grail: much smaller, better-looking files without having to convince people to install a plugin or browser makers to support a new file-format.
  • Open source: The new normal in enterprise software
    Open source software — that is, software that gives users permission to modify, copy and distribute its source code and is either freely distributed or licensed — used to be viewed as the red-headed stepchild of enterprise software. "It took time for enterprise to come on board," said Rafael Laguna, CEO of Open-Xchange, a German open-source company specializing in open-source email software. "If you go back 10 years, [proprietary software from] Microsoft, IBM dominated the architecture of enterprise software, but that is changing."
  • Blender Making Progress On Its Realtime PBR Engine
    F Eevee is the codename for the Blender project to implement a realtime engine with physically-based rendering (PBR) within Blender 2.8. This realtime, PBR-based engine is aiming to deliver high-end graphics with a responsive realtime view-port. The developers working on "Eevee" have made progress with lighting, materials, and other features.
  • Chef automation survey: what shape is the continuous enterprise?
  • Cloud Foundry connects open-source standards for quicker code development
    Tech businesses are discovering a powerful truth: building custom code is no fun. It takes time, it’s a distraction from working on core products and it’s likely someone out there already did it better. The real solution is for a company to integrate mature and tested products into their own systems, but that can be a job in itself. Open-source software, built around specific abstract standards, can help simplify the work involved. Cloud Foundry is an organization dedicated to creating and maintaining an open-source abstraction platform to speed up software development.
  • IBM's cloud dreams soar on the wings of AI, open source
  • IBM launches cloud-based blockchain service for Linux Hyperledger Fabric
    IBM also announced availability of blockchain governance tools and new open-source developer tools aimed at shortening the time it takes to build with Hyperledger Fabric.
  • 10 Vendors Jumping on the Kubernetes Bandwagon
  • From supply chain to equity, seven real-world uses of the blockchain today

    A blockchain is a digital ledger that is available for all parties to see, providing transparency across the chain – and businesses in financial trading, insurance, and supply chain management are all taking notice.

  • Mozilla has proposed 'Obsidian', a low-level GPU API for the web
    So it looks like after Vulkan for desktop and mobile, the web may be getting a low-level API for interactions with the GPU. They are calling it Obsidian right now (temporary name) and they state it's not a specification just yet, as they are looking to gather feedback.

Linux and FOSS Events

  • 33C3 - Event Report
    I recently had the opportunity to attend the 33rd Chaos Communication Congress (33C3). The event, as its name suggests, was chaotic. Let me give you two hints: twelve thousand (12000) participants, plus twenty-four (24) hours unrestricted access to the venue.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference returns to MIT this weekend, March 25-26
    LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. LibrePlanet 2017 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels. In accordance with the theme "The Roots of Freedom," the conference's sessions will examine the roots of the free software movement, including the Four Freedoms, the GNU General Public License and copyleft, and the community's focus on security and privacy protections. Other sessions will explore new ideas and current work that has arisen from those roots, reaching in to activism, the arts, business, and education. Keynote speakers include Kade Crockford, Director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, special consultant to the Electronic Frontier Foundation and author Cory Doctorow, Changeset Consulting founder Sumana Harihareswara, and Free Software Foundation founder and president Richard Stallman.
  • ZTE’s Approach to Digital Transformation with Software-Defined Networking
    The dawn of new services such as 5G, IoT, AR/VR, e-commerce, connected cars,and more, is driving us to digitalization -- a massive transition that also requires the network to change.
  • Easier Persistent Memory Programming with Extensions to libstdc++ and libc++
    Persistent memory, unlike volatile memory, retains its contents even if the server has a power failure. However, as Tomasz Kapela, Software Engineer at Intel, points out during his LinuxCon Europe 2016 talk, persistent memory is hard to achieve. Since persistent memory programming is non-trivial, they have been focused on making it easier for the end user and for applications to use persistent memory correctly.
  • Persistent Memory Extensions to libstdc++/libc++ by Tomasz Kapela, Intel

Development News: GitLab 9.0, CRAN, and 2038 Bug

  • GitLab 9.0 released with Subgroups and Deploy Boards
    Today we are releasing GitLab 9.0, 18 months after releasing 8.0. We've made significant advances to GitLab during this period, shipping a version every single month on the 22nd. Let's quickly recap how far we've come since 8.0, and see those features dovetailing into today's 9.0 release. Or jump ahead to 9.0 features.
  • Suggests != Depends
    A number of packages on CRAN use Suggests: casually.
  • 2038: only 21 years away
    Sometimes it seems that things have gone relatively quiet on the year-2038 front. But time keeps moving forward, and the point in early 2038 when 32-bit time_t values can no longer represent times correctly is now less than 21 years away. That may seem like a long time, but the relatively long life cycle of many embedded systems means that some systems deployed today will still be in service when that deadline hits. One of the developers leading the effort to address this problem is Arnd Bergmann; at Linaro Connect 2017 he gave an update on where that work stands. That work, he said, is proceeding on three separate fronts, the first of which is the kernel itself. He has been working for the last five years to try to prepare the kernel for 2038. Much of that work involves converting 32-bit timestamps to 64-bit values, even on 32-bit systems. Some 32-bit timestamps also show up in the user-space API, which complicates the issue considerably. There is a plan for the enhancement of the user-space API with 2038-clean versions of the problematic system calls, but it has not yet gotten upstream. One recent exception is the statx() system call, which was merged for 4.11; statx() will serve as the year-2038-capable version of the stat() family of calls. There are quite a few other system calls still needing 2038-clean replacements, though.