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Blackphone Android-based (SilentOS) Reviews

  • Blackphone: privacy-obsessed smartphone aims to broaden its appeal
    Can you hear me now? Not if you’re eavesdropping on a Blackphone. Privacy company Silent Circle has released a second version of its signature handheld, a smartphone designed to quell the data scraping and web tracking that’s become such an integral part of the digital economy in the last few years (and whose results might well end up with the NSA, if the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act passes).
  • Blackphone 2: NSA-thwarting Android smartphone goes on sale
    The handset runs a new version of the firm's Android-based SilentOS, and comes with features including Silent Circle's Silent Phone app, which offers encrypted voice calls, messaging and file transfers.
  • Five things that doomed the big and brilliant BlackBerry 10
    And being late matters. In a globalised technology industry, hundreds of smaller industries, and their own supply chains, all line themselves up alongside the winners. Being late and going it alone is suicidal. Ask Nokia: it envisaged a 'computer first, phone second world' as far back as 2002, when it started Linux development, and devoted billions to being sure it would be competitive when this world came about. But consumers and industry had already anointed a second platform.

Leftovers: OSS

  • All Things Open exclusive preview and discount
    Join us in Raleigh, North Carolina, from October 19 - 20 at All Things Open 2015. You can also enter for a chance to win a free pass to All Things Open 2015.
  • Three students jump into open source with OpenMRS and Sahana Eden
    We are three students in the Bachelor of Computer Science second degree program at the University of British Columbia (UBC). As we each have cooperative education experience, our technical ability and contributions have increasingly become a point of focus as we approach graduation. Our past couple of years at UBC have allowed us to produce some great technical content, but we all found ourselves with one component noticeably absent from our resumes: an open source contribution. While the reasons for this are varied, they all stem from the fact that making a contribution involves a set of skills that goes far beyond anything taught in the classroom or even learned during an internship. It requires a person to be outgoing with complete strangers, to be proactive in seeking out problems to solve, and to have effective written communication.
  • Your field's talent is expecting openness
    Open source social and cultural history is the antithesis of traditional organizational management structures, and, unfortunately, it's younger. Emotion is influenced by surroundings and norms, and what we learned about hierarchy when we were growing up influences how we participate in business today.
  • The official user survey, visualizing your cloud, and more OpenStack news
  • At Demo, Hadoop inventor calls NSA snooping a cautionary tale for devs
    The creator of Hadoop said web app developers must put public trust first and argued that actions by the National Security Agency (NSA) offer a cautionary tale for the future of big data. Doug Cutting, who in 2004 developed the open-source implementation of the Map-Reduce framework, said big data analytics has opened the floodgates for capturing new consumer data as well as analyzing vast stores of historical information.
  • Arcadia Enterprise: Visual Business Intelligence Meets Hadoop
    Hadoop is on a roll in the Big Data space. Allied Market Research has forecasted that the global market for Hadoop along with related hardware, software, and services will reach $50.2 billion by 2020, propelled by greater use of raw, unstructured, and structured data.
  • On Getting the OpenStack Skills That Get Jobs
    What kind of demand is there for cloud computing skills in the job market? Consider these notes from Forbes, based on a report from WANTED Analytics: "There are 3.9 million jobs in the U.S. affiliated with cloud computing today with 384,478 in IT alone. The median salary for IT professionals with cloud computing experience is $90,950 and the median salary for positions that pay over $100,000 a year is $116,950."
  • The State of Hadoop: Survey Forecasts Substantial Growth
  • Talend Delivers Spark-Powered Data Integration Platform
  • Hortonworks unveils big data scorecard
    At Strata + Hadoop World here yesterday, Hadoop distribution specialist Hortonworks unveiled a new tool called the Hortonworks Big Data Scorecard designed to help organizations develop a plan for jumpstarting big data projects.
  • LibreOffice merchandising is available from Spreadshirt.Net
  • Oracle’s “planned obsolescence” for Java
    Oracle is no longer interested in Java, according to an anonymous top-level Java source at Oracle. As rumours of Oracle’s neglect pile up, it looks more and more like IT’s most popular programming language is becoming a driverless train.
  • Call for Testing: tame userland diff
    The full diff follows in the original mail, but it's probably simpler to just use a snapshot. For those of you who've been looking forward to seeing how it handles, now's the time to find out.
  • Software that liberates people: feels about FSF@30 and OSFeels@1
    tl;dr: I want to liberate people; software is a (critical) tool to that end. There is a conference this weekend that understands that, but I worry it isn’t FSF’s.
  • Zulip chat from Dropbox, Linux Foundation report, FCC rules, and more news
  • Lunduke Pens Book, Year of the Desktop Won’t Happen & More…
    Mea culpa: I went to bed last night thinking it was Wednesday, woke up today thinking it was Thursday, went along with my usual Thursday work plan (which differs little from any other weekday) until Christine Hall emailed me and asked, “Where’s the wrap?”
  • Teach, Don’t Tell
    This post is about writing technical documentation. More specifically: it’s about writing documentation for programming languages and libraries. [...] Let’s get started. The first thing to nail down is why we’re documenting a programming language or library in the first place.