Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • TriggerMesh Aims to Orchestrate Serverless Computing on Kubernetes

    TriggerMesh has raised $3 million in additional funding to advance the integration of Kubernetes clusters with serverless computing frameworks. In addition, the company announced it has made available open source integrations between its namesake orchestration for serverless computing frameworks and IBM MQ event sources, VMware vSphere event sources and the Microsoft Azure Event Hub channel controller. The TriggerMesh platform provides access to a cloud bus to facilitate application flow orchestration and the consumption of events emanating from any data center application or cloud source. It is designed to trigger serverless functions using a declarative application programming interface (APIs) and a set of tools for defining event flows and functions. Company co-founder Mark Hindle says that as IT organizations embrace modern application development platforms, a transition is occurring in terms of how stateless and stateful applications are constructed. Initially, organizations limited container use to building stateless applications. Now, however, many stateless applications are being built using functions that access serverless computing frameworks. [...] Unfortunately, serverless computing standards, de facto or otherwise, are a work in progress. Google and its allies are making a case for a set of open source Knative middleware that integrates Kubernetes clusters with any number of open serverless computing frameworks. However, the adoption of open serverless computing frameworks is still relatively nascent. The most widely used serverless computing framework is the proprietary AWS Lambda service. However, the adoption of rival frameworks is expected to increase substantially in 2020—a report published this week by Allied Market Research predicts the global serverless architecture market will reach $22 billion by 2025, representing a compound annual growth rate of 27.8% between 2018 and 2025.

  • 2020-01-24 | Linux Headlines

    Permissive licenses are on the rise, Open GApps comes to Android 10, Intel unexpectedly joins the CHIPS Alliance, and KDE receives another large donation.

  • Meet the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Default Wallpaper
  • Blocking spammers in https://progress.opensuse.org

    But our ticket system is not really planned to become a ticket system: we run Redmine, which originally is intended to be a project management software. The ability to create issues (or tickets, as we call them) in the system by sending an Email was not really intended in the beginning. So the ability to detect and mark Spam Emails as such simply does not exist. Even worse: every Email results in a user, that get's created automatically, to allow us to send out an Email to this person as answer to his ticket. All of this is not really problematic: you learn to deal with it. But with over 14,000 "users" in the database (and over 17,000 real tickets), the system started to become slow. So we invested a bit of our time and looked into the user list. Good for us: most of the Spammers seen to have special days to submit their stuff. And even more interesting: they do it at the same time from multiple accounts!

  • A forum for Flathub

    Flathub is primarily built around GitHub, where applications manifests and infrastructure code live. Unsurprisingly, it turns out that code hosting platform isn't exactly a go-to place for the community to connect, even if one slaps a discussion label on an issue. Timezones and personal commitments mean that IRC is also not an ideal platform for discussion, and Flathub does not have a mailing list for discussion and announcements.

  • F31-20200122 Updated Live isos released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated F31-20200122 Live ISOs, carrying the 5.4.12-200 kernel. This set of updated isos will save considerable amounts of updates after install. ((for new installs.)(New installs of Workstation have 1GB+ of updates)). A huge thank you goes out to irc nicks dowdle, Southern-Gentleman for testing these iso.

  • CircleCI automates Continuous Delivery to multiple clouds

    Modern software development is fast, continuous, and automated. Today, by research company Statista's count, 88% of organizations are using Agile methods and Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD). Yet there remains one major stumbling block: Moving a freshly minted program from a CI pipeline to delivery to a cloud or other service provider. That's where DevOps company CircleCI comes in with a new suite of orb integrations with 20 partners such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud, Salesforce, and others. These enable developers to automate remote deployments in minutes from their CI/CD pipeline. [...] CircleCI's partners are happy with the expansion of orbs. Rayn Veerubhotla, Google Cloud's Director of Hybrid Partnerships, said: "Google Cloud Run helps developers run stateless containers and focus on writing high-value code, without worrying about the underlying infrastructure. By launching these new tools, CircleCI is enabling developers to further streamline and simplify their experience on Cloud Run, ultimately helping businesses bring new services and products to their customers more quickly." The same is true of all the clouds that orbs are now supporting. If you find your CI/CD team slowed down by final step deployment issues, you should check this new offering out. It could save you time, work, and money.

  • Dfinity launches an open-source platform aimed at the social networking giants

    And to prove out the concept of how an application would run on its new network, Dfinity today demonstrated an open social network called LinkedUp. The startup has rather cheekily called this “an open version of LinkedIn,” the Microsoft-owned social network for professionals. Unlike LinkedIn, LinkedUp, which runs on any browser, is not owned or controlled by a corporate entity. LinkedUp is built on Dfinity’s so-called Internet Computer, its name for the platform it is building to distribute the next generation of software and open internet services.

  • Introducing The Lunduke Journal - New Name, New Website

    With so many people reading the articles, obviously those articles need to live somewhere under my control.

    Up until now I've been publishing them over on Patreon. I made those articles free for everyone to read, but utilized Patreon as simply a publishing platform. This worked well enough for the occasional article... but that needed to change.

    You can now find every article published under the Lunduke Journal name right here at Lunduke.com. You can also find an always up to date RSS feed of the articles right here as well. That way you can get notified the moment a new article (and corresponding episode, audio and video) is published.

    If you've been enjoying the content over the last few months, never fear. No significant changes to any of that, outside of the name, branding, and website changes. The meat of what made The Lunduke Show is exactly the same in The Lunduke Journal.

  • Themes from Real World Crypto 2020

    Over 642 brilliant cryptographic minds gathered for Real World Crypto 2020, an annual conference that brings together cryptographic researchers with developers implementing cryptography in the wild. Overall, RWC 2020 was an impressive conference that demonstrated some amazing work. Here we explore three major themes that emerged: [...]

  • Results of the Pan-European Quantum Internet Hackathon

    In November 2019, we organised the first ever multi-location Quantum Internet hackathon.

    [...]

    Since the Quantum Internet is still really new, most practical results were obtained by sharing existing software and protocols and receiving feedback on how to improve them. Actual bug fixes, additional features and new software were also valuable outcomes of the event. All the links to the produced software were collected on the PEQI2019 pages on GitHub.

  • How fast can a new internet standard for sharing patient data catch fire?

    Six big tech companies -- Microsoft, Google, Amazon, IBM, Oracle and Salesforce -- have also joined to support FHIR and broader sharing of health care data through a government-endorsed project called Blue Button, which is intended to make it easier for patients to view and download their health records.

    Consumer advocates and cybersecurity experts warn that personal health information shared on the web could be compromised. They want to make sure the risk is minimized before any widespread rollout of FHIR products. Patients do not have a say in how their health providers store medical information, but patients can request their records be sent in the format they prefer, including paper.

    Facilitating access to all that data for both patients and providers without first determining how to keep it secure may open a Pandora's box that can never be shut, warned David Finn, executive vice president of strategic innovation for CynergisTek, a Mission Viejo, California, and Austin, Texas-based cybersecurity consulting firm.

  • California to resume Elsevier talks after signing deals elsewhere

    The 10-campus California system -- now more than six months without access to Elsevier's library of 2,500 journals -- announced that the two sides will hold "a meeting to explore reopening negotiations" early this year.

    Given the open access deals the California system has signed elsewhere, the system's library leaders said in a statement, "we are hopeful that this suggests that the publisher is ready to discuss deals that align with UC's goals".

    The California-Elsevier showdown has been watched nationally and globally, a reflection of the size and importance of the two players and the multibillion-dollar stakes surrounding the challenge across academia of making published research findings open to all.

Security Leftovers: BlueTooth, Spectre/Meltdown and Huawei Disputes

  • BlueTooth Security Risks

    Security risks involving bluetooth vulnerabilities include techniques known as: bluebugging, bluesnarfing, bluejacking, denial of service and exploits for different holes. When a device is configured in discoverable an attacker may try to apply these techniques. Today mobile security was strongly increased and most attacks fail, yet sometimes security holes are discovered and new exploits emerge. As mobile devices prevent the user from installing unmonitored software freely most of attacks are difficult to carry out. This tutorial describes the most common Bluetooth attacks, the tools used to carry out these attacks and the security measures users can take to prevent them. [...] While bluetooth attacks aren’t widely used (when compared with other types of attacks like phishing or DDOS) almost every person carrying a mobile device is a potential victim, therefore in our countries most people are exposed, also through bluetooth, to sensitive data leak. On the other hand most manufacturers already patched devices to protect them from almost all attacks described above, but they only can issue a fix after the vulnerability was discovered and published (like with any vulnerability). While there is not defensive software the best solution is to keep the device turned off in public spaces, since most attacks require a short range you can use the device safely in private places. I hope you found this tutorial on Bluetooth Security Risks useful. Keep following LinuxHint for more tips and updates on Linux and networking.

  • Arm Has Many Changes On Tap For Linux 5.6 From Spectre/Meltdown Bits To New RNG

    While the Linux 5.5 kernel isn't even released yet, it's ideally coming out on Sunday should there not be a one week delay. But in any event Arm's Will Deacon has already sent in the pull request of the ARM architecture changes for Linux 5.6.

  • The Pentagon pushes back on Huawei ban in bid for ‘balance’

    Huawei may have just found itself an ally in the most unexpected of places. According to a new report out of The Wall Street Journal, both the Defense and Treasury Departments are pushing back on a Commerce Department-led ban on sales from the embattled Chinese hardware giant. That move, in turn, has reportedly led Commerce Department officials to withdraw a proposal set to make it even more difficult for U.S.-based companies to work with Huawei. Defense Secretary Mark Esper struck a fittingly pragmatic tone while speaking with the paper, noting, “We have to be conscious of sustaining those [technology] companies’ supply chains and those innovators. That’s the balance we have to strike.”

today's howtos