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More in Tux Machines

Switching to Linux OS isn't as scary as you think " here's why

For long-time Windows and macOS users, the thought of switching to Linux instills fear. But when Linux is just as good (and honestly, a lot safer), why not make the switch? Linux operating systems are often the go-to option for the tech savvy or computer enthusiasts, consequently, it’s almost seen as exclusive to that niche. People might think, “If tech-savvy nerds gravitate toward Linux, it’s probably not for me.” However, that’s just not true. If you switch smartphone brands, there’s always a learning curve, but ultimately, you end up knowing that new phone like the back of your hand. It’s the same concept with an operating system on a laptop. There’s an adjustment period, but Linux operating systems are actually pretty intuitive. Read more

Microsoft Antitrust Abuses, Sabotage, and Ad-Stuffing

GCC 12.1 supports China's LoongArch CPU family

Version 12.1 of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) was released this month, and among its many changes is support for China's LoongArch processor architecture. The announcement of the release is here; the LoongArch port was accepted as recently as March. China's Academy of Sciences developed a family of MIPS-compatible microprocessors in the early 2000s. In 2010 the tech was spun out into a company called Loongson Technology which today markets silicon under the brand "Godson". The company bills itself as working to develop technology that secures China and underpins its ability to innovate, a reflection of Beijing's belief that home-grown CPU architectures are critical to the nation's future. LoongArch emerged from Loongson around about last year, and was described as a new RISC ISA that comes in 32-bit and 64-bit flavours. Read more Also: Paper Published: Deep space reception of Tianwen-1 by AMSAT-DL using GNU radio

Software: AV, RPCS3, Email Encryption, and More

  • Top 15 Best Linux Antivirus Programs in 2022 [Ed: Waste of money, waste of CPU, and likely more privacy breaches and security holes on your system (some AV companies get caught red-handed)]

    There are always errors and problems in the computer Operating System, especially intentionally made mistakes, which we call trojans, malware, and viruses. Linux OS is a much more efficient and secure OS, but still, there are possibilities to have these problems. To decrease these issues, many security specialists have developed a lot of antivirus for Linux already. These antiviruses aim to detect and remove all the threats before they harm the system. Well, if you are a Linux user and planning to try something for your system’s protection, I am sure you are on the right track.

  • RPCS3 Latest Updates Bring Major Performance Improvements for Metal Gear Solid 4, Red Dead Redemption and Persona 5

    RPCS3 is a multi-platform open-source Sony PlayStation 3 emulator and debugger written in C++ for Windows, Linux and BSD. It was founded by programmers DH and Hykem. Initially hosted on Google Code, the project was eventually migrated to GitHub later on in its development. RPCS3's first successful boots were primarily composed of small homebrew projects and hardware tests. The emulator was later publicly released in June of 2012 and gained substantial attention from both the open-source community and PlayStation enthusiasts alike. Today, RPCS3 is primarily developed by its two lead developers; Nekotekina, kd-11 and backed by flourishing team of GitHub contributors.

  • GnuCash Review [Ed: GNU software reviewed in Microsoft site]

    GnuCash is free, open-source software that offers both personal financial management and professional accounting capability. GnuCash is completely free, making it a great option for start-ups and micro-businesses with limited budgets.

  • Mimecast: The 5 Types of Email Encryption

    Email encryption is one of the most misunderstood and complex fields of data security, with many companies either using it incorrectly or not using it at all. However, it remains the most secure way to send data across the Internet, with various protocols securing data against cyberattackers and other threats.

  • LibreOffice Review 2022: Features, Pricing & More [Ed: Microsoft site ranks LibreOffice only 3 our of 5. Conflict of interest not stated.]