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More in Tux Machines

10 Linux Based Mini PCs to Buy in 2020

It won’t be wrong to say that mini PCs have all the potential in the world to take over the computer market shortly. Not only do they save a lot of space on your computer desk but also work in a very power-efficient manner while also causing less noise. Although they could be a tad more expensive than regular desktop PCs, they will actually save you some money in the long run. With that being said, one thing that should be noted here is that most of these mini PCs are not as powerful as your regular desktop computers when it comes to processing power, memory size, and storage space. Accordingly, users who don’t plan on either gaming or video editing should definitely give these computers a shot. The 10 Best Linux-based Mini PCs Mini PCs aren’t anything new since they’ve been in the computer market for quite a while now. However, the number of such computers that have optimal support for Linux distros is still relatively small. So, in this article, we’re going to do all the research for you and provide you with some of the best Linux-based mini PCs out there right now. Read more

Auto-Suspend Inactive X11 Applications To Reduce CPU And Battery Usage With XSuspender

XSuspender is a tool to suspend X11 applications when they are inactive. Its purpose is to reduce CPU usage, which in turn reduces the battery usage, and decreases the CPU temperature and fan noise. The tool uses SIGSTOP, which prevents the process from obtaining further CPU time, or a custom shell script that you can specify, to suspend an application after its window loses focus. When the window regains focus, it's immediately resumed so you can continue from where you left off. Read more

Note-Taking App Simplenote 2.0 Released With Support For Internal Links, More

The Simplenote Electron desktop application has received a major update yesterday. The new 2.0.0 version includes a rewrite "of some key parts of the app, as well as replacing the editor component and adding support for internal links". Simplenote is a note-taking application with optional Markdown support. There are applications for desktops (Linux, Windows and macOS), iOS and Android, and there's also a web client. The Simplenote applications are free and open source software, but the server is not (though there's no cost in using it to sync notes). Originally created by Simperium back in 2008, Simplenote is developed by Automattic, the company behind Wordpress.com, Akismet, etc., since 2013. Simplenote features include notes version history, instant search and search by tags, public note links, optional Makrdown support, different note views, light and dark themes, and the ability to export notes. Read more

Servers: Ubuntu, Kube and More

  • Telco cloud: what is that? | Ubuntu

    Telco cloud or a network function virtualisation infrastructure (NFVI) is a cloud environment optimised for telco workloads. It is usually based on well-known technologies like OpenStack. Thus, in many ways, it resembles ordinary clouds. On the other hand, however, it differs from them. This is because telco workloads have very specific requirements. Those include performance acceleration, high level of security and orchestration capabilities. In order to better understand where those demands are coming from, let’s start with reviewing what kind of workloads are telcos running in the cloud.

  • OpenStack at 10 – from peak to plateau of productivity | Ubuntu

    This week is the latest Open Infrastructure Summit, in a week where the OpenStack Foundation became the Open Infrastructure Foundation to reflect the expansion of the organisation’s mission, scope and community to advance open source over the next decade to support open infrastructure. It is also ten years since OpenStack launched and a lot has changed during that time. We asked freelance journalist, Sean Michael Kerner, to share his views on the last ten years. Sean is a freelance journalist writing on myriad IT topics for publications around the world. He has spoken at more OpenStack events than he cares to remember. English is his second language (Klingon his first). Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist. 10 years ago in July 2010, I got an unusual pitch from a PR person. It was the beginning of a long and winding road that defines my experience and viewpoint on OpenStack. Unlike the usual spate of product and open source pitches from vendors that I got at the time (and still get), the pitch I got on the sunny July afternoon was an offer to speak with the CTO of IT at NASA. It was an offer I couldn’t refuse – and I suspect it’s also the reason why OpenStack got so much attention early on – it was literally ‘rocket science’. In a 2012 video interview I did with Chris Kemp after he left the role of CTO at NASA to start his own OpenStack startup, he told me that in his view OpenStack could well become one of NASA’s great contributions to society.

  • Canonical & Ubuntu at KubeCon NA Virtual 2020 | Ubuntu

    By now it’s no surprise that KubeCon NA is going virtual, like the majority of events worldwide. Is that bad news? Quite the opposite! According to CNCF, this year’s KubeCon EU – the first KubeCon to ever be hosted virtually – made it possible for over 18,700 Kubeheads to sign up, 72% of which were first-time KubeCon + CloudNativeCon attendees. In other words, as we have all believed for so many years now, tech is helping the community grow and get closer.

  • Production-Ready Notebooks for End-to-End ML Workflows With Kubeflow

    Machine Learning projects consist of several distinct steps: first, data validation verifies the state of the collected data. Processing prepares the features so an algorithm can consume them. Model training makes learning feasible, and model validation guarantees generalization. Fine-tuning adjusts the hyper-parameters to obtain the optimum results. Finally, after numerous iterations, the last step deploys a model to staging or production. Each of these steps can be a separate process, running at its own cadence, with well-defined inputs and outputs. Thus, data scientists and ML engineers tend to think of these projects like pipelines. If there is something wrong with incoming information, the process could fail or even worse corrupt downstream analytic tasks. Thus, standardizing the process of creating these interconnected actions can make the pipeline more robust. In this article, we demonstrate how to turn Jupyter Notebooks into Kubeflow Pipelines and Katib Experiments automatically. Such a system eliminates the erroneous process of manually extracting the bits that make sense in a Notebook, containerize them and launching a Pipeline using explicit Domain-Specific Languages.

  • Support for Istio 1.6 ends on November 21st, 2020

    According to Istio’s support policy, LTS releases like 1.6 are supported for three months after the next LTS release. Since 1.7 was released on August 21st, support for 1.6 will end on November 21st, 2020. At that point we will stop back-porting fixes for security issues and critical bugs to 1.6, so we encourage you to upgrade to the latest version of Istio (1.7.3). If you don’t do this you may put yourself in the position of having to do a major upgrade on a short timeframe to pick up a critical fix.

  • Cloud Foundry Foundation Announces Project Updates

    The Cloud Foundry Foundation (CFF) has announced the release of version 1.0 of cf-for-k8s, the release of version 2.5 of KubeCF, and the release of version 4.2 of Stratos.