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Latest Deepin Linux Release Promises to Consume Less Memory Than Ubuntu, Windows

Coming just two months after the Deepin 15.6 release that introduced new Light and Dark themes, Deepin 15.7 is now available with a focus on performance. It smaller ISO size by removing unnecessary components and optimizing the core system structure, better power optimization for laptops for up to 20 percent battery life, and improved memory usage. "Deepin 15.7 has made a series of adjustments and optimizations in memory usage. In the standard configuration, the boot memory has decreased from 1.1G to 830M, and reduced to less than 800M on a discrete graphics card," wrote the devs in today's announcement, where they compared the memory consumptions of Deepin 15.7, Deepin 15.6 and other operating systems on the same computer. Read more

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Daily Lives Now Ship with Yaru Theme by Default

We've been waiting for this moment for a couple of weeks now and we're proud to be the first to report that the Yaru theme developed by various members of the Ubuntu Linux community has now finally been enabled by default in the daily builds of the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system. Of course, we immediately took a screenshot tour of the Yaru theme on today's Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) daily build so we can show you how great it looks. We think it's a professional theme that matures Ubuntu to the next level, and it is definitely a step in the right direction for the look and feel of the Ubuntu Desktop. Read more

The Performance Hit For A Xeon-Backed Ubuntu Linux VM With L1TF / Foreshadow Patches

Last week L1 Terminal Fault (a.k.a. L1TF and Foreshadow) was made public as the latest set of speculative execution vulnerabilities affecting Intel processors. This Meltdown-like issue was met by same-day Linux kernel patches for mitigating the problem and does introduce another performance penalty but in this case is at least only limited to virtual machines. Last week I posted some initial L1TF-mitigated KVM-based VM benchmark results using a Core i7 CPU but the results for sharing today are using a much more powerful dual Xeon server. For getting a better idea of the performance impact of mitigating L1TF/Foreshadow vulnerabilities I tested the Ubuntu patched kernel in a variety of configurations. First was the unmitigated Ubuntu 18.04 kernel, then Ubuntu 18.04 with the default out-of-the-box mitigation on the host and guest kernels, then having the host booted with the kernel parameter to force an L1D cache flush on every VMENTER rather than the default behavior of the conditional flushing, and then again when booting with l1tf=full for the full mitigation, which in the process also disables SMT/HT support. Read more

Blueberry Pi DIY hacker board taps Allwinner V3

Marcel Thürmer has posted schematics for building a two-layer, Linux-ready “Blueberry Pi” SBC with a solderable, Cortex-A7 Allwinner V3 with 64MB RAM, plus WiFi/BT, Ethernet, USB, RGB, MIPI-CSI, and a 26-pin RPi header. Hardware developer Marcel Thürmer has gone to Hackaday to announce the release of open schematics for DIYers to build a Linux hacker board called the Blueberry Pi . The open-spec SBC project, which was further revealed on Hackster.io, eases the path for hobbyists by using a simple 2-layer design — compared to 6x layers on the Raspberry Pi — and by incorporating a highly integrated Allwinner V3 SoC. Read more