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More in Tux Machines

Thanks For Making Games Faster: Top 10 Quotes from the Linux Kernel Developer Panel

Linux gamers owe a debt of gratitude to kernel developer Andy Lutomirski for his recent work getting 32-bit programs to run faster on a 64-bit kernel, said Greg Kroah-Hartman during the Linux kernel panel today at LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America. “A lot of people thought, who cares? It turned out Valve cares,” Kroah-Hartman, a Linux kernel developer and Linux Foundation Fellow, said. All of their games are still 32-bit applications but Valve wanted them to run on the 64-bit architecture, he said. “You just sped up all the gamers,” Kroah-Hartman said on stage to enthusiastic applause. “You made their machines run faster without realizing it. Thank you.” “You're welcome,” said Lutomirski, a relative newcomer to kernel development. Kroah-Hartman, who moderated the panel discussion, was joined on stage by Linux Creator Linus Torvalds as well as kernel developers Andrew Morton from Google, Shuah Khan from Samsung, and Lutomirski, a co-founder of AMA Capital Management. Their discussion covered a range of topics from the top challenges facing the kernel community, to the toughest bugs they've fixed and everything in between. Here are some of the highlights of the discussion, below. The full session will be available soon on the Linux Foundation YouTube channel. Read more

The Many Things You Can Build With A Raspberry Pi

Ruth Suehle and Tom Callaway are presenting at LinuxCon 2014 Chicago tomorrow about many different Raspberry Pi hacks and other Linux capabilities of these low-cost, low-performance single board computers. The two Fedora contributors cover the back-story of the Raspberry Pi for anyone that's been sleeping under a rock, how to go about getting parts for the RPi, and the process to get Linux running on the ~$35 ARMv6 system. With Linux running on the Raspberry Pi, the possibilities are nearly endless for this low-cost development-friendly board. Read more

Today in Techrights

Raspberry Pi Devices Spread in Schools, Help Teach Programming

According to a new DigiTimes report, sales of credit-card sized Raspberry Pi devices, which run Linux, remain very strong. The Raspberry Pi Foundation says that 3.5 million units have sold worldwide, with demand from China and Taiwan staying strong. The devices are helping to teach children basic programming skills and are arriving in educational systems all around the world. Read more