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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • The cyber-mechanics who protect your car from hackers
    “Most manufacturers know there is a problem and they’re working on solutions, but no-one will go public with it,” explains Martin Hunt, who works in automotive penetration testing for UK telecommunications firm BT.
  • US to rethink hacker tool export rules after mass freakout in security land
    Proposed changes to the US government's export controls on hacking tools will likely be scaled back following widespread criticism from the infosec community, a government spokesman has said. "A second iteration of this regulation will be promulgated," a spokesman for the US Department of Commerce told Reuters, "and you can infer from that that the first one will be withdrawn." The proposed restrictions are required by the Wassenaar Arrangement, a 41-nation pact that first came into effect in 1996 and which calls for limits on trade of "dual-use goods," meaning items that have both civilian and military applications. In 2013, the list of goods governed under the Arrangement was amended to include technologies used for testing, penetrating, and exploiting vulnerabilities in computer systems and networks.
  • Remote denial of service vulnerability exposes BIND servers
    BIND operators released new versions of the DNS protocol software overnight to patch a critical vulnerability which can be exploited for use in denial-of-service cyberattacks. Lead investigator Michael McNally from the Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) said in a security advisory the bug, CVE-2015-5477, is a critical issue which can allow hijackers to send malicious packets to knock out email systems, websites and other online services.
  • Botnet takedowns: are they worth it?
    The number of botnets has grown rapidly over the last decade. From Gameover Zeus leveraging encrypted peer-to-peer command and control servers, to Conflicker, infecting millions of computers across the world – botnets are continuing to infiltrate many internet-based services and causing mass disruption, and it's getting worse.

Phoronix on Graphics

Installing Linux on a Mac, Why Bother?

Lately, I found myself being asked by many of my readers, as well as some of my friends, if it's worth installing Linux on their Mac, so I decided to write this editorial and explain the situation from my point of view. Read more

Rackspace reaching out to women with ‘Linux for Ladies’

Law wasn’t proving lucrative for Jodi McMaster, who at 54 found herself eking by with contract legal work and freelance copy-editing gigs. Read more