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Vulkan 1.2.155 Released and AMDVLK 2020.Q3.6 Vulkan Driver Brings Several Fixes

  • Vulkan 1.2.155 Released With EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64

    Vulkan 1.2.155 is out this morning as a small weekly update over last week's spec revision that brought the Vulkan Portability Extension 1.0 for easing software-based Vulkan implementations running atop other graphics APIs. Vulkan 1.2.155 is quite a tiny release after that big release last week, but there aren't even any documentation corrections/clarifications and just a sole new extension.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q3.6 Vulkan Driver Brings Several Fixes

    AMD driver developers today released AMDVLK 2020.Q3.6 as their latest open-source snapshot of their official Vulkan graphics driver. The primary new feature of this AMDVLK driver update is VK_EXT_robustness2, which mandates stricter requirements around dealing with out-of-bounds reads/writes. Robustness2 requires greater bounds checking, discarding out-of-bounds writes, and out-of-bounds reads must return zero. This extension debuted back in April as part of Vulkan 1.2.139.

9 Best Free and Open Source RAW Processing Tools

When a digital camera captures an image, image sensors in the camera record the light from millions of sensing area. The camera’s digital circuitry converts the generated analog voltage signal into a digital representation. Many cameras allow these images to be stored in a raw image file. They are similar to digital negatives, as they have the same role as negatives in film photography. RAW files are not directly usable, but have all the necessary information to create an image. RAW files usually offer higher color depth, higher dynamic range, and preserve most of the information of the image compared with the final image format. The downside of RAW files is that they take up far more storage space. Dynamic range in photography describes the ratio between the maximum and minimum measurable light intensities (white and black, respectively). As implied by the name, RAW files have not been processed. By taking pictures in raw format the photographer is not committing to the conversion software that is built into the firmware of the camera. Instead, the individual can store the raw files, and make use of computer software to generate better JPEG files, and also benefit from future improvements in image software. There is a good range of open source Linux software that processes RAW files. Here’s our recommendations. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who has a passion for digital photography. Read more

Python Programming

  • Padding Strings in Python

    String padding refers to adding, usually, non-informative characters to a string to one or both ends of it. This is most often done for output formatting and alignment purposes, but it can have useful practical applications. A frequent use case for padding strings is outputting table-like information in a table-like fashion. You can do this in a variety of ways, including using Pandas to convert your data to an actual table. This way, Python would handle the output formatting on its own.

  • Resources to learn Tableau, Power BI, Python etc
  • Implementing Common Python Built-ins in JavaScript

    In this post we'll try to implement common Python builtins such as min mas etc in JavaScript.

  • Python’s Generator and Yield Explained

    Generators are iterators, a kind of iterable you can only iterate over once. So what are iterators anyway? An iterator is an object that can be iterated (looped) upon. It is used to abstract a container of data to make it behave like an iterable object. Some common iterable objects in Python are – lists, strings, dictionary. Every generator is an iterator, but not vice versa. A generator is built by calling a function that has one or more yield expressions.

Richard Hughes: 20 Million Downloads from the LVFS

A few hours ago the LVFS provided its 20 millionth firmware update and although it’s just another somewhat unusual base-10 number, it’s an achievement I’m immensely proud of. As one of my friends said last week, “20 million of anything is a big deal”. Right from the start, the fwupd daemon and LVFS website data provider was a result of collaboration between many different companies and open source projects, and is now cemented as an integral part of the firmware ecosystem. People building open source projects, especially low level infrastructure like this, are not good at celebrating success and it’s no wonder so many talented maintainers burn out over long years of dedicated service. This post celebrates some of the things we’ve done. Little known to most people, fwupd and the LVFS grew out of the frustration of distributing the ColorHug firmware. If you bought one of those devices all those years ago, you can know you were a tiny part in starting all this. I still use ColorHug devices for all kinds of automated firmware testing, perhaps even more so than for screen calibration. My experience building OpenHardware devices really pushed me to make the LVFS free-for-all, on the logic that I wouldn’t have been able to justify even a $100/year subscription. Certainly making the service free in all respects meant that it was almost risk-free for companies to test the service. Read more Also: LVFS/Fwupd Serve More Than 20 Million Firmware Downloads For Upgrades On Linux