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Moz/FF

Chromium and Firefox: New Features

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Google
Moz/FF
  • Chromebook Owners Will Soon Be Able to Monitor CPU and RAM Usage in Real-Time

    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort announced today that Google's Chrome OS engineers have managed to implement a new feature that will let Chromebook owners monitor the CPU usage, RAM, and zRam statistics in real-time.

    The feature was implemented in the Chrome Canary experimental channel and can be easily enabled by opening the Google Chrome web browser and accessing the chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag. There you'll be able to monitor your Chromebook's hardware and see what's eating your memory or CPU during heavy workloads, all in real-time.

    "Chrome OS users can monitor in real-time their CPU usage, memory and zRam statistics thanks to the new internal page chrome://sys-internals in the latest Canary," said François Beaufort in a Google+ post. "For that, enable the experimental chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag, restart Chrome, and enjoy watching real-time resource consumption."

  • Tracking Protection for Firefox for iOS Plus Multi-Tasking in Focus for Android New Today

    Across the industry, September is always an exciting month in mobile, and the same is true here at Mozilla.

    Today, we’re launching the newest Firefox for iOS alongside an update for the popular Firefox Focus for Android, which we launched in June.

Chrome 61 Released, Mozilla Firefox Bugfix for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • New in Chrome 61
  • Chrome 61 Brings WebUSB, JavaScript Modules & More
  • Chrome 61 Enters Stable Channel, Now Rolling Out For Windows, Mac and Linux

    Chrome 61 has finally entered the stable channel with a slew of developer-focused features and general security fixes. The desktop version for Chrome 61 has started rolling out today, available for Mac, Windows, and Linux. It brings the latest WebUSB API, which enables web apps to interact with computer peripherals like keyboards, mice and printers.

  • Google Chrome 61 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    Today Google launched version 61 of the Chrome browser for Windows, Mac, and Linux. With this release, we have 21 security updates, numerous improvements and bug fixes, and three APIs that allow developers to further enhance their sites and apps.

  • Mozilla Firefox Finally Fixes An Awkward, 11 Year Old Linux Bug

    It's taken more than a decade, but after enough user complaints, there is finally a patch queued for Firefox 57 to fix an arguably annoying default behavior of Firefox on Linux/Unix systems.

    The default setting on Firefox has long been when the middle mouse button is clicked to open an URL based upon the contents of the clipboard. Most users don't expect this behavior by default and many have found it to be incredibly awkward accidentally opening a new tab with some web-page based upon what's in your copy-paste clipboard.

Politics at Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Diversity and inclusion: Stop talking and do your homework

    At Mozilla, we believe that to influence positive change in diversity and inclusion (D&I) in our communities, and more broadly in open source, we need to learn, empathize, innovate, and take action. Open source is missing out on diverse perspectives and experiences that can drive change for a better world because we're stuck in our ways—continually leaning on long-held assumptions about why we lose people. Counting who makes it through the gauntlet of tasks and exclusive cultural norms that leads to a first pull request can't be enough. Neither can celebrating increased diversity on stage at technical conferences, especially when the audience remains homogeneous and abuse goes unchallenged.

  • Statement on U.S. DACA Program

    We want DREAMers to continue contributing to this country’s future and we do not want people to live in fear. We urge the Administration to keep the DACA program intact. At the same time, we urge leaders in government to enact a bipartisan permanent solution, one that will allow these bright minds to prosper in the country we know and love.

Mozilla announces a ₹1 crore fund to support Open source projects in India

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

Bangalore: Mozilla has announced the launch of “Global Mission Partners: India”, an award program specifically focused on supporting open source and free software.

The new initiative builds on the existing “Mission Partners” program. Applicants based in India can apply for funding to support any open source/free software projects which significantly further Mozilla’s mission.

Read more

Firefox Using Client Side Decoration, AdNauseam Blocked

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox Using Client Side Decoration (Video)

    If you’ve been longing to see some progress on Firefox GTK header bar support you’re going to want to feast your eyes on this.

    Alex of WOGUE fame has posted a new video to showcase Firefox CSD as it looks and works right now.

    Now, he had to build (painfully, I hear) >from Git to try this out, but his video shows “all upstream work from Mozillians [and] no patches!”.

  • AdNauseam extension blocked

    Since proponents of this extension will likely be unhappy or have questions as to why, and likely want to be vocal about this addition:

    After investigating the AdNauseam extension's behavior and the results for web publishers, the extension has been added to the Pale Moon blocklist with a severity level of 2 (meaning you won't be able to enable it unless you increase the blocking level in about:config to 3). For those unfamiliar with this extension: it generates false ad "clicks" to ad servers in an attempt to generate "noise" for the ad networks in a protest against the advertising network system as a whole.
    While the premise behind this is similar to poisoning trackers with false fingerprints (which we are proponents of, ourselves), and we normally let users decide for themselves what they want to do with their browser, we are strictly against allowing extensions that cause direct damage (including damage to third parties). There is a subtle but important difference between blocking content and generating fake user interaction.

Mozilla: FCC and Project Quantum

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The Battle to Save Net Neutrality: A Panel with Tom Wheeler, Ro Khanna, Mozilla, Leading TV Producers and Others

    In May, the FCC voted to move forward with plans to gut net neutrality. It was a decision met with furor: Since then, many millions of Americans have written, phoned and petitioned the FCC, demanding an internet that belongs to individual users, not broadband ISP gatekeepers. And scores of nonprofits and technology companies have organized to amplify Americans’ voices.

    The first net neutrality public comment period ends on August 30, and the FCC is moving closer to a vote.

    So on Monday, September 18, Mozilla is gathering leaders at the forefront of protecting net neutrality. We’ll discuss why it matters, what lies ahead, and what can be done to protect it.

  • Inside a super fast CSS engine: Quantum CSS (aka Stylo)

    You may have heard of Project Quantum… it’s a major rewrite of Firefox’s internals to make Firefox fast. We’re swapping in parts from our experimental browser, Servo, and making massive improvements to other parts of the engine.

  • Mozilla's Push For Super Fast CSS With Quantum/Stylo

    Since the end of July Stylo has been available via Firefox Nightly as the Rust-written Servo CSS style system. For those curious about this modern CSS system and the broader effort as part of bringing Servo/Quantum components to Firefox, Mozilla has out an interesting blog post.

Firefox 54: Speed, customization and future

Filed under
Moz/FF

Ever since Mozilla embarked on the Chrome-me-up journey a few years ago, my enthusiasm took on a six-weekly decline cadence, with each new release of the Firefox browser bringing in more of what Firefox shouldn't be and less of what made it such a cool program in the hands of its loyal users. But the best is yet to come. The true rite of passage. Only the most righteous will survive. WebExtensions.

While trying to salvage some of what it still has left while actively scuppering its fanbase and killing off its powerful extension mechanism, Mozilla is working on giving its browser a breath of fresh air. More speed, it seems, as though it is the critical factor that made people abandon ship. But assuming it is, does it make a difference? Let's test.

Read more

Old Firefox add-ons get 'dead man walking' call

Filed under
Moz/FF

The end of legacy Firefox plugins is drawing closer, with Mozilla's Jorge Villalobos saying they'll be disabled in an upcoming nightly build of the browser's 57th edition.

While he didn't specify just how soon the dread date will arrive, Villalobos writes: “There should be no expectation of legacy add-on support on this or later versions”.

Read more

Mozilla Firefox 55 Brings Virtual Reality to the Web

Filed under
Moz/FF

If you are setting up WordPress on a new Linux VPS for the first time you may face some problems like missing some PHP extensions. One example is missing the MySQL extension and this is a common problem since the extension doesn't come by default with many operating systems. In this tutorial we will help you to fix the problem with the missing extension and complete the WordPress installation successfully.

Read more

More on Firefox 55

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Firefox 55 Web Browser Is Now Available to Download, Here's What's New

    It's not yet official, but the Firefox 55.0 open-source and cross-platform web browser is now available for download on GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    Mozilla will make the release of Firefox 55 official on August 8, 2017, but you can get an early taste right now by downloading the binary or source packages for supported OSes from Mozilla's FTP servers if you can't wait to update your Firefox web browser through OTA updates.

    And it just happens that we got our hands on the preliminary release notes that were seeded on the Beta channel since Firefox 55 entered development on June 14, 2017. Thirteen RCs later and the final release of Firefox 55.0 is now ready to be savored on your favorite operating system.

  • Firefox 55 Released, This Is What’s New

    Firefox 55 features a number of welcome improvements in memory usage and startup time, and offers 'search suggestions' in the URL bar.

  • Firefox Is Better, For You. WebVR and new speedy features launching today in Firefox

    Perhaps you’re starting to see a pattern – we’re working furiously to make Firefox faster and better than ever. And today we’re shipping a new release that’s our best yet, one that introduces exciting, empowering new technologies for creators as well as improves the everyday experience for all Firefox users.

    [...]

    Are you a tab hoarder? As part of our Quantum Flow project to improve performance, we’ve significantly reduced the time it takes to start Firefox when restoring tabs from a previous session. Just how much faster are things now? Mozillian Dietrich Ayala ran an interesting experiment, comparing how long it takes to start various versions of Firefox with a whopping 1,691 tabs open. The end result? What used to take nearly eight minutes, now takes just 15 seconds.

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More in Tux Machines

Download latest Linux-based LibreELEC Krypton -- Kodi addons like Exodus and Covenant will work

The Kodi media center is facing a lot of scrutiny in the media lately. Some people feel that the negative coverage is "fake news." It is important to remember that Kodi is not illegal. With that said, it can be made so with piracy-related addons. Since Kodi is open source, even if the developers removed the ability to install addons, other people could easily fork the code to add it back. Pandora's box cannot be closed. Many people that use Kodi do so with a dedicated Linux-based operating system, such as the excellent LibreELEC. You see, these distros exist only to run the open source media center, meaning there are no resources wasted on unnecessary things. Today, LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.1.2 BETA sees release. You can install it immediately, and don't worry -- your addons like Exodus and Covenant will work fine. Read more

Arduino unveils tiny, battery powered MKR boards for LoRa and 3G

Arduino launched two 67.6 x 25mm boards for wireless IoT nodes based on Atmel’s SAM D21 MCU: The MKR WAN 1300 offers LoRa, and the MKR GSM 1400 provides 3G. At the Maker Faire in New York this weekend, Arduino unveiled two new “MKR” IoT boards with the same 32-bit, Cortex-M0+ based Microchip/Atmel ATSAMD21 MCU used by last December’s MKRZero. Available for pre-order, with shipment in November, both the LoRa enabled, $39 Arduino MKR WAN 1300 and the 2G/3G ready, $69 Arduino MKR GSM 1400 measure 67.6 x 25mm. That’s only slightly larger than the 65 x 25mm MKRZero and earlier, WiFi-enabled MKR1000. Read more

AndEX Puts Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 64-Bit on Your PC with GAPPS and Netflix

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton has released a new build of his Android-x86 fork AndEX that leverages Google's Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 mobile operating system for 64-bit PCs with various updates and improvements. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Advancing with Open Source
    For today’s system administrators, the future holds tremendous promise. In this ebook, we have covered many technical skills that can be big differentiators for sysadmins looking to advance their careers. But, increasingly, open source skillsets can also open new doors. A decade ago, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst predicted that open source tools and platforms would become pervasive in IT. Today, that prediction has come true, with profound implications for the employment market. Participating in open source projects -- through developing code, submitting a bug report, or contributing to documentation -- is an important way to demonstrate open source skills to hiring managers.
  • FreeType Improvements For The Adobe Engine
    With FreeType 2.8.1 having been released last week, a lot of new code landed in the early hours of today to its Git repository. The code landed includes the work done this summer by Ewald Hew for Google Summer of Code (GSoC 17) adding support for Type 1 fonts to the Adobe CFF engine. Type 1 is an older, less maintained font format.
  • Are You Fond Of HDR Photography? Try Luminance HDR Application In Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    Luminance HDR is an graphical user interface that is used for manipulation and creation of High Dynamic Range(HDR) images. It is based on Qt5 toolkit, it is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac, and released under the GNU GPL license. It provides a complete workflow for High Dynamic Range(HDR) as well as Low Dynamic Range (LDR) file formats. Prerequisite of HDR photography are several narrow-range digital images with different exposures. Luminance HDR combines these images and calculates a high-contrast image. In order to view this image on a regular computer monitor, Luminance HDR can convert it into a displayable LDR image format using a variety of methods, such as tone mapping.
  • Opera Web Browser Now Has Built-in WhatsApp and FB Messenger, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Enterprise open source comes of age
    In the age of digitalisation and data centre modernisation, open source has come of age. This is demonstrated by the growth that enterprise open source software provider SUSE has enjoyed over the last months. “SUSE is in good shape,” says Nils Brauckmann, CEO of SUSE. “In the last year, revenue grew at 21%, and it was profitable growth.” Business is positive going forward, he adds, with SUSE now part of the larger mothership Micro Focus group following the completion this month of the HPE Software spin merger. “Micro focus is now the seventh-largest pure-play software vendor in the world, with revenues approaching $4,5-billion,” Brauckmann points out.
  • Red Hat, Microsoft Extend Alliance to SQL Server
  • UbuCon Europe 2017
    I’ve been to many Ubuntu related events before, but what surprises me every time about UbuCons is the outstanding work by the community organising these events. Earlier this month, I was in Paris for UbuCon Europe 2017. I had quite high expectations about the event/location and the talks, especially because the French Ubuntu community is known for hosting awesome events several times a year like Ubuntu Party and Ubuntu install parties.
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