Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Mozilla Wants to Save the Open Web, but is it Too Late?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Again, I think this is absolutely correct. But what it fails to recognise is that one of the key ways of making the Web medium "less free and open" is the use of legally-protected DRM. DRM is the very antithesis of openness and of sharing. And yet, sadly, as I reported back in May, Mozilla has decided to back adding DRM to the Web, starting first with video (but it won't end there...) This means Mozilla's Firefox is itself is a vector of attack against openness and sharing, and undermines its own lofty goals in the Open Web Fellows programme.

Read more

Chromecast getting competition from Firefox OS-powered Matchstick

Filed under
OS
Moz/FF

The streaming stick market is apparently heating up. Google, Microsoft, and Amazon all have entrants in this space, and if a new Kickstarter appeal succeeds, there will soon be a Firefox OS stick getting in on the action.
Inspired by the Chromecast, the Matchstick will plug into your TV using HDMI, connect to devices locally using Wi-Fi, and be used as a streaming media platform. Unlike Chromecast, however, Matchstick will use the open source Firefox OS as its base, making it readily accessible to developers who will be able to build HTML apps for Matchstick that leverage open Web technologies.

Read more

Tor executive director hints at Firefox integration

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

Tor, which is capable of of all that and more, crucially blocks websites from learning any identifying information about you and circumvents censorship. It also stymies eavesdroppers from discovering what you’re doing on the Web. For those reasons, it would be a powerful addition to the arsenal of privacy tools Firefox already possesses.

The Tor Browser is already a modified version of Firefox, developed over the last decade with close communication between the Tor developers and Mozilla on issues such as security and usability.

Read more

Pale Moon Shines for Classic Firefox Fans

Filed under
Moz/FF

Much of the good stuff about Pale Moon is under the hood. Taken together, all of it contributes to a more efficient performance. For example, Pale Moon is optimized for modern processors such as SSE2. A lot of the built-in bloat of the Firefox code is removed. That gets rid of things like accessibility features and WebRTC. The social API code is disabled by default.

Read more

Firejail – A Security Sandbox for Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

Firejail is a SUID sandbox program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications. The core technology behind Firejail is Linux Namespaces, a virtualization technology available in Linux kernel. It allows a process and all its descendants to have their own private view of the globally shared kernel resources, such as the network stack, process table, mount table, IPC space.

Read more

Firefox 32.0.3 Lands in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

After Mozilla released the latest Firefox 32.0.3 Internet browser, the Ubuntu maintainers were quick to make the new version available to the supported OSes.

According to the Ubuntu security report, fraudulent security certificates could have allowed sensitive information to be exposed when accessing the Internet. "Antoine Delignat-Lavaud and others discovered that NSS incorrectly handled parsing ASN.1 values. An attacker could use this issue to forge RSA certificates."

Read more

Mozilla: Phasing Out Certificates with SHA-1 based Signature Algorithms

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

We plan to add a security warning to the Web Console to remind developers that they should not be using a SHA-1 based certificate. We will display an additional, more prominent warning if the certificate will be valid after January 1, 2017, since we will reject that certificate after that date. We plan to implement these warnings in the next few weeks, so they should be appearing in released versions of Firefox in early 2015. We may implement additional UI indicators later. For instance, after January 1, 2016, we plan to show the “Untrusted Connection” error whenever a newly issued SHA-1 certificate is encountered in Firefox. After January 1, 2017, we plan to show the “Untrusted Connection” error whenever a SHA-1 certificate is encountered in Firefox.

Read more

Global Web Literacy Gets a Boost From Maker Party 2014

Filed under
Moz/FF

This week we celebrated the record-breaking 2,513 events in 86 countries that made up Maker Party 2014. The campaign, which officially began on July 15th and ended this week, brought nearly 130,000 adults and children together to learn valuable digital literacy skills in classrooms, libraries, cafes, and living rooms around the world.

Whether creating their first mobile apps with Appmaker, discussing the nuances of net neutrality during our global teach-in, or turning libraries into full-fledged maker spaces, this year’s crop of Maker Party events unleashed the creativity of a global community of web makers.

Read more

Expanding Reach in Asia: Telenor Group Brings Firefox OS Smartphones to Bangladesh

Filed under
Moz/FF

“This launch was made possible through the cooperation between Grameenphone, Telenor, Mozilla and Symphony,” says Rolv-Erik Spilling, SVP and Head of Telenor Digital. “For us, it’s important to provide the Bangladeshi market with an easy, affordable and locally relevant mobile internet experience, which the Firefox phone enables.”

Telenor was one of the first operator partners to support the development of Firefox OS. After launches in Hungary, Serbia and Montenegro in 2013, Telenor now expands its Firefox OS offering to Asia.

Read more

Rust Developers Planning For The Rust 1.0 Language

Filed under
Moz/FF

Rust, the general purpose, safe, and concurrent programming language developed by Mozilla Research, is starting to assemble their vision of Rust 1.0.

A new post on the Rust Programming Language Blog is laying out the path to Rust 1.0. The developers hope to move to Rust 1.0 soon with a beta coming out hopefully by the end of the year and the official release to follow. This Rust 1.0 milestone is to signify the Rust design "feeling right" and a promise to maintain backwards compatibility for future 1.x releases.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Udine city struggles to remove IT vendor lock-in

The Italian city of Udine is 'gradually and painfully' removing all the ties that bind the city's ICT systems to the usual proprietary operating systems and office productivity solutions, reports head of the IT department, Antonio Scaramuzzi. The city aims to slowly introduce more free and open source software alternatives. Unhurried, the municipality is implementing open source technologies where feasible, avoiding big migration projects, Scaramuzzi writes to the Open Source Observatory and Repository (OSOR). Earlier this month, IT trade news site Zdnet that the town is making Apache OpenOffice the default office suite. The software is already installed on all of the city's 900 PCs. ZDNet writes that this switch will save the city about 400 euro per PC in proprietary software licences. Read more

The Path to Full-time Open Source

Three months ago I quit my job to work on Sidekiq and build a brand new OSS project and commercial product. Tomorrow I want to introduce it to you. Read more

Mir 0.8 Works On Less ABI Breakage, Touchspots, Responsiveness

While Ubuntu 14.10 on the desktop isn't using Mir by default, Mir 0.8.0 is being prepared for release by Canonical and it has a number of interesting changes. Read more

Open source history, present day, and licensing

Looking at open source softwares particularly, this is a fact that is probably useful to you if you are thinking about business models, many people don't care about it anymore. We talk about FOSS, Free and Open Source Software, but if we really are strict there's a difference between free software and open source software. On the left, I have free software which most typically is GPL software. Software where the license insures freedom. It gives freedoms to you as a user, but it also requires that the freedoms are maintained. On the right-hand side, you have open source software which is open for all, but it also allows you to close it. So here we come back to the famous clause of the GPL license, the reciprocity requirement which says, "If I am open, you need to be open." So software that comes under the GPL license carries with it something that other people call a virus. I call it a blessing because I think it's great if all software becomes open. Read more