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Drupal Association and Project Lead Statement Regarding Larry Garfield

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Drupal

We recognize that events and conversations earlier this year surfaced many concerns and needs within the community. One in particular is related to Larry Garfield’s role within Drupal. After several conversations with Larry, and careful consideration, we can now provide an update to this situation, our decisions, and Larry’s role moving forward.

We thank you for your patience while we spent many hours meeting with Larry and outside experts to resolve this matter. We recognize that actions were taken quickly before, which resulted in poor communication, and we wanted to avoid this happening again. We made sure to provide the proper time and attention these conversations needed before releasing this follow-up post.

We know our poor communication in the past led to frustration with us and pain for others. For that, we are sorry. We want to learn from this and improve. We listened to the community’s request to provide more streamlined, clear, and easy-to-follow communication. So, this post includes a statement from Dries Buytaert, as Project Lead, followed by a statement from Megan Sanicki, Executive Director of the Drupal Association.

[...]

Larry's subsequent blog posts harmed the community and had a material impact on the Drupal Association, including membership cancellations from those who believed we doxed, bullied, and discriminated against Larry as well as significant staff disruption. Due to the harm caused, the Drupal Association is removing Larry Garfield from leadership roles that we are responsible for, effective today.

[...]

As long as Larry does not harm or disrupt the project, he will continue to be a member of the community as an individual contributor. However, we reserve the right to remove Larry's individual contributor roles if that is not the case. Also, we recognize that situations can change over time, so the Drupal Association will revisit these decisions in two years.

I recognize that my communication to Larry and with the community did not provide transparency into this situation and I apologize for the pain and confusion that caused. Our advisors told us not to share these details in order to protect all parties pending evaluation from authorities. Also, when Larry shared these details during the appeal process, he asked us to keep them confidential. It is my hope that this statement provides the clarity that many have been requesting.

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German firms unveil DeGov eGovernment platform

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OSS
Drupal

German ICT service providers are pooling their work on public administration portals, leveraging open source software. The companies unveiled DeGov, a portal solution built on Drupal 8, at the ‘Drupal in der öffentlichen Verwaltung’ (Drupal in public administration) conference in Düsseldorf on 17 November.

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FOSS CMS News

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OSS
Drupal
Web
  • WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, More: Keeping Up With Open Source CMS

    Due to its organic nature, the world of open source software is in constant flux, which makes it difficult to keep tabs on.

    To keep you in the loop, I’m kicking off a monthly roundup of open source CMS news, starting today.

    Here are your latest open source CMS highlights.

  • 4 open source peer-to-peer marketplaces

    What happens if your startup can't afford one of these proprietary solutions or you need customized features? You go look for an open source alternative that could open the space for new solutions and modules. Here are four peer-to-peer marketplaces that are working to become the Wordpress or Prestashop of their kind.

The future of Drupal could be cooking in this lab

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Drupal

Acquia Labs has no illusions of making self-driving cars or shooting things into space like Google X, but the budding applied research arm of enterprise open-source Drupal provider Acquia does have designs on a slew of new applications for what it anticipates will be an increasingly browserless world.

Preston So, development manager at Acquia Labs and a 9-year veteran of the Drupal community, shared his vision for Acquia’s skunkworks-plus outfit at the company’s annual Engage event for customers held in Boston this week.

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FOSS CMS News

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OSS
Drupal
  • The Wix Mobile App, a WordPress Joint

    Anyone who knows me knows that I like to try new things — phones, gadgets, apps. Last week I downloaded the new Wix (closed, proprietary, non-open-sourced, non-GPL) mobile app. I’m always interested to see how others tackle the challenge of building and editing websites from a mobile device.

    I started playing around with the editor, and felt… déjà vu. It was familiar. Like I had used it before.

    Turns out I had. Because it’s WordPress.

  • WordPress and Wix Are Fighting About Open Source Software

    So WordPress and Wix are fighting one another – and I'm not talking about them competing for customers. Instead, the two website building heavyweights are having a brawl via the blogosphere.

  • Attackers use patched exploits to hit Joomla! sites
  • Joomla websites attacked en masse using recently patched exploits

    Attackers are aggressively attacking Joomla-based websites by exploiting two critical vulnerabilities patched last week.

    The flaws allow the creation of accounts with elevated privileges on websites built with the popular Joomla content management system, even if account registration is disabled. They were patched in Joomla 3.6.4, released Tuesday.

  • Georgia state government earns national recognition for web accessibility

    Georgia's enterprise web platform runs on Drupal 7, which includes many accessibility features in its baseline code and structure. That makes it easier for any new site to build in accessibility from day one. This comes with the caveat that not all modules are accessible, and plenty can be coded and designed without accessibility in mind, meaning that just using Drupal does not make a site accessible to users with disabilities. That said, even in its original implementation with Drupal 7 in 2012, Georgia's web publishing platform was built to meet federal accessibility standards (Section 508, for those of you interested in the details).

    From there, when the product team wanted to improve the platform's underlying code to meet the more modern WCAG 2.0 AA accessibility guidelines, they were working from a flexible and scalable base.

FOSS CMS News

Filed under
Software
OSS
Drupal
  • Wix denies allegations it stole WordPress code, says it open sourced work

    A day after being on the receiving end of allegations that it not only stole code from WordPress, it also failed to contribute back to the open-source community, Wix has responded, saying that the claims against it are baseless and that its do-it-yourself website building platform has been operating in good faith.

    In an open letter to WordPress creator Matt Mullenweg, Wix chief executive and cofounder Avishai Abrahami answered every criticism leveled at his company. He admitted that Wix did use WordPress’ open source library for “a minor part of the application,” but claimed that every modification or improvement the team made was submitted back as open source. Mullenweg had said previously that Wix’s mobile app editor, which was released this month, was built using “stolen code.”

  • Wix Delivers Weak Response To Stolen WordPress Code Claims

    Recently, Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg’s accused Wix of stealing source code from WordPress and using it in the company’s mobile app “without attribution, credit, or following the license”. Wix, deciding it was best not to let Mullenweg’s stipulations go unchallenged, has fired back with a double-barrelled, if wishy-washy, reply.

    Matt Mullenweg’s letter garnered not one, but two responses from Wix: the first from CEO Avishai Abrahami and the second via the company’s lead engineer Tal Kol.

  • WordPress Creator Matt Mullenweg Blasts Wix, Avishai Abrahami Responds

    Matt Mullenweg, the creator of WordPress, is not happy with the editor used in the Wix mobile app, saying the web building service copied his platform. Wix.com's CEO Avishai Abrahami responds to Mullenweg's accusations.

    Mullenweg said in his blog that Wix's mobile app seems familiar to him, it's like he had used it before. He said he has because it's WordPress.

    "If I were being honest, I'd say that Wix copied WordPress without attribution, credit, or following the license," he said. "Wix has always borrowed liberally from WordPress - including their company name, which used to be Wixpress Ltd. - but this blatant rip-off and code theft is beyond anything I've seen before from a competitor."

  • Nasdaq Taps Open Source Tech for IR

    Nasdaq Corporate Solutions, a business line of Nasdaq, Inc., is banking on the collective input from users of Drupal open-source web content management technology to empower its platform for IR websites.

  • Moodle Installation Made Easy

    Moodle is a very popular course-management system, equivalent to Blackboard, but entirely free and open source. This short YouTube video by Moodle expert Nellie Deutsch explains how you can install Moodle in your cPanel with Softaculous in under 2 minutes.

Nasdaq Selects Drupal 8

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Drupal

Dries Buytaert announced today that Nasdaq Corporate Solutions has selected Drupal 8 and will work with Acquia to create its Investor Relations Website Platform. In the words of Angela Byron, a.k.a "Webchick", "This is a big freakin' deal."

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Direct: Nasdaq using Drupal 8 for new Investor Relations websites

A brief history of Drupal from 1.0 to 8.0

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Drupal

Drupal began as a forum for a few friends to monitor their shared Internet connection, which "was expensive and being spliced between them," according to Jared Whitehead's The rise of Drupal and the fall of closed source. Today, it's one of the most popular content management systems out there, competing with powerhouses like WordPress.

So, what has the Drupal community done to ensure continued competitiveness, usability, and overall sustainability? In this article, I'll walk you through Drupal's evolution chronologically, including key design decisions and feature upgrades. My sources include the History of Drupal: from Drop 1.0 to Drupal 8.0 slideshow by WebSolutions HR and Drupal's CHANGELOG.txt.

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FOSS content management systems (CMS)

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OSS
Drupal
Web
  • How to Resolve Your Open Content Management Quandary

    After years of development and competition, open source content management systems (CMS) have proliferated and are very powerful tools for building, deploying and managing web sites, blogs and more. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla.

    As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue. The good news is that free, sophisticated guides for evaluating CMS systems have flourished. There are even good options for trying open CMS systems online before you choose one. Here, in this newly updated post, you'll find some very good resources.

    he first thing to pursue as you evaluate CMS systems to deploy, including the many free, good platforms, is an overview of what is available. CMSMatrix.org is a great site for plotting out side-by-side comparisons of what CMS systems have to offer. In fact, it lets you compare the features in over 1200 content management system products. Definitely take a look. This site also has a good overview of the options.

  • Postleaf is an open-source blogging platform for the design-conscious

    Content management systems are boring until you have to use one. You can install a little Drupal or WordPress, pick up some Squarespace, or just dump to Medium, the graveyard for posts about protein shakes and VC funding. But what if you could roll your own CMS? And what if you made it really cool?

    That’s what Cory LaViska did. LaViska is the founder of SurrealCMS and has been making it easy to edit stuff on the web for nine years. Rather than build and sell an acceptable CMS, however, he took all of his best ideas and made a far better CMS. And he made it open source and called it Postleaf.

A step ahead on Drupal 8 with easy accessibility design

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Interviews
Drupal

The biggest mistake is bigger than Drupal: They don't consider it at all. This isn't a platform thing, it's a problem that is endemic to the web. Big companies get dragged into accessibility via legal threats. Small companies don't even think about it. Just the act of raising accessibility as an issue, and asking your team to keep it in mind throughout the design and development process is a big deal. You have to start somewhere.

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More in Tux Machines

icons and Themes: Vamox , Ashes, and DamaDamas

  • Vamox Icons Offers Three Color Variants for Linux Desktop
    Vamox icons were designed as a university thesis project by Emiliano Luciani and Darío Badagnani in 2008. The objective was to design a interface of a distro that the university could use for learning about design thin free software, From start these icons were developed for Ubuntu. Now these icons has three variants blue, orange and red, which are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as: Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. We have added these icons to our PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint and other related distributions, If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint/its derivatives then download icons and install it in one of these "~/.icons" or "/usr/share/icons/" location. If you find any missing icons or problem with this icon set then report it to creator via linked page and hopefully it will get fixed soon.
  • Ashes Is A Light Theme For Your Linux Desktop
    Ashes theme is based on Adapta and Flat-Plat theme but it includes the mixture of blue and pink color scheme with gray search entity. Usually derived themes always try to make better and enhanced version by the person who forked it, to make desktop much perfect and elegant, same thing goes for this theme, it looks and feels great on almost every desktop. Mainly it is designed to work in Unity and Gnome desktop but it can also work in other desktops such as Cinnamon, Mate, and so on. For the Gnome desktop creator have added the dark title-bar/header-bar support, so you can enable Global-Dark-Theme using Gnome-Tweak-Tool, if you prefer dark title-bars. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint/its derivatives then download theme from here and install it "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes/" location. If you find any kind of bug or issue within this theme then report it to creator and since this theme is in active development hopefully it will be fixed soon.
  • DamaDamas Icons Looks Great And At The Same Time Give Windows Flavor
    If you have been searching for Windows icons for your Linux desktop then you are at the right place. The DamaDamas icons are from Pisi GNU/Linux and available for every Linux distribution, these icons give Windows look and feel to your desktop. There isn't much information available for these icons but the icons are SVG format and there are almost 4000+ icons packed in very fairly sized archive. We have added these icons to our PPA and these icons are compatible with almost every desktop environment such as: Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, KDE Plasma and so on. If you find any missing icons or problem with this icon set then report it to creator via linked page and hopefully it will get fixed soon.

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Alpha 2, Solus 3, OpenMandriva Lx 3.02, and More

KDE: QtWebEngine on FreeBSD, KDE PIM, Akademy 2017, Craft, Accessibility, Comics Manager for Krita, Progress on Kube

  • QtWebEngine on FreeBSD
    Tobias and Raphael pushed the button today to push QtWebEngine into FreeBSD ports. This has been a monumental effort, because the codebase is just .. ugh. Not meant for third-party consumption, let’s say. There are 76 patches needed to get it to compile at all. Lots of annoying changes to make, like explaining that pkg-config is not a Linux-only technology. Nor is NSS, or Mesa, while #include is, in fact, Linux-only. Lots of patches can be shared with the Chromium browser, but it’s a terrible time-sink nonetheless.
  •  
  • KDE PIM in Randa 2017
    Randa Meetings is an annual meeting of KDE developers in a small village in Swiss Alps. The Randa Meetings is the most productive event I ever attended (since there’s nothing much else to do but hack from morning until night and eat Mario’s chocolate :-)) and it’s very focused – this year main topic is making KDE more accessible. Several KDE PIM developers will be present as well – and while we will certainly want to hear other’s input regarding accessibility of Kontact, our main goal in Randa will be to port away from KDateTime (the KDE4 way of handling date and time in software) to QDateTime (the Qt way of handling date and time). This does not sound very interesting, but it’s a very important step for us, as afterward, we will finally be free of all legacy KDE4 code. It is no simple task, but we are confident we can finish the port during the hackfest. If everything goes smoothly, we might even have time for some more cool improvements and fixes in Kontact ;-)
  • Services Collaborating Openly at Akademy 2017
    At the recently concluded Akademy 2017 in the incredibly hot but lovely Almería, yours truly went and did something a little silly: Submitted both a talk (which got accepted) and hosted a BoF, both about Open Collaboration Services, and the software stack which KDE builds to support that API in the software we produce. The whole thing was amazing. A great deal of work, very tiring, but all 'round amazing. I even managed to find time to hack a little bit on Calligra Gemini, which was really nice. This blog entry collects the results from the presentation and the BoF. I realise this is quite long, but i hope that you stick with it. In the BoF rundown, i have highlighted the specific results, so hopefully you'll be able to skim-and-detail-read your specific interest areas ;)
  • Akademy 2017 - A wonderful experience
    Akademy 2017 was such a great experience, that I would love to share with you all in this post.
  • Akademy 2017 - Recap
    Last month I had opportunity to visit the Almería, Spain for Akademy 2017. Akademy 2017 is KDE’s annual world summit. Akademy makes it possible to meet the felow KDE contributors, some of whom you only know with their IRC nicknames (Yes, I am not old enough to know every contributors yet :p). Here is few things I did at the Akademy 2017.
  • My Adventures on Crafting part III – Craft Atelier
    Once upon a time, I start o use Craft, an amazing tool inside KDE that does almost all the hard work to compile KDE Applications on Windows and MacOS. Thanks to the great work of Hannah since last year Randa Meetings, Craft is becoming a great tool. Using all the power of Python, I started to be able to work on the deploy of AtCore for Windows.
  • Why YOU care about accessibility, and can help!
    Accessibility (a11y for short) seems like a niche area of concern for many people. I was thinking about this recently on a hot morning in Spain, walking to the bus station with my wheeled luggage. The sidewalks are thoughtfully cut out for wheelchairs -- and those with luggage! and the kids riding skateboards, and...... the rest of us.
  • Writing a comics manager for Krita
    Those who know me, or at the least know my history with Krita is that one of the prime things I personally want to use Krita for is making comics. So back in the day one of the things I did was make a big forum post discussing the different parts of making a comic and how different software solves it. One of the things about making a comic is that is a project. Meaning, it is big and unwieldy, with multiple files and multiple disciplines. You need to be able to write, to draw, to ink, to color. And you need to be able to do this consistently.
  • Progress on Kube
    We’ve been mostly focusing on ironing out UX problems all over the place. It turns out, when writing desktop applications using QtQuick you’ll be ending up with a lot of details to figure out for yourself.

OSS: Thankful For Free Software Developers, Mastodon Size, foss-gbg and More

  • People Should Really Be Thankful For Free Software Developers
    Users don’t usually realize the value of free software they get for free. Things like Linux, LibreOffice, Inkscape, GIMP and a lot of other free software may be essential in the daily life of each of us. However, we may not actually feel “pleasure” for those software developers who provided us with all of this. They may not feel the value of what they have. If you ask an engineer, a doctor, a professor, a teacher or a farmer to give you one of the products they do for free, probably they will just refuse. You won’t find a professor working full time in a university for free. You won’t find a civil engineer working on building houses for free. You won’t find a farmer giving you vegetables for free. However, you do find software developers giving it for you for free. Software are not developed by magic. Developing good software requires investing hundreds of hours in it. And although of all of that, we find a huge number of software developers who are ready to create free software for us. Investing just 100 hours in developing a small tool should worth $1500 (with a minimum wage of $15 per hour). So imagine how much it really costs to invest thousands of hours in such processes. Let’s make a small comparison.
  • Mastodon is big in Japan. The reason why is… uncomfortable
    It’s hard to say how fast Mastodon is growing, because it’s hard to say how big Mastodon is. The Mastodon Network Monitoring Project does its best to keep up, but servers come online and go down all the time. If you’re running a Mastodon server and don’t register or federate it (perfectly reasonable if you want a community just for people you invite) it won’t register on the project’s dashboard. So we might think of the 1.5 million registered users on ~2400 servers as the network’s minimum size. [...] Our team at the MIT Media Lab – Chelsea Barabas, Neha Narula and myself – are releasing a new report today on distributed publishing, titled “Back to the Future: the Decentralized Web” We end up speculating that the main barriers to adoption of decentralized platforms aren’t technical, but around usability. Most distributed publishing tools are simply too complex for most users to adopt. Mastodon may have overcome that problem, borrowing design ideas from a successful commercial product. But the example of lolicon may challenge our theories in two directions. One, if you’re unable to share content on the sites you’re used to using – Twitter, in this case – you may be more willing to adopt a new tool, even if its interface is initially unfamiliar. Second, an additional barrier to adoption for decentralized publishing may be that its first large userbase is a population that cannot use centralized social networks. Any stigma associated with this community may make it harder for users with other interests to adopt these new tools.
  • foss-gbg gets going again
    foss-gbg is a local group sharing ideas and knowledge around Free and Open Source Software in the Gothenburg area.
  • Chrome/Chromium Seems To Perform Better And Here Are Some Useful Extensions
    Since its launch in 2008, Google Chrome has now become the most popular web browser, leaving the competition way behind. Google Chrome is available for various operating systems such as Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. Linux is the most popular open source operating system, used by millions worldwide. Aside from being open source software, Linux is also customizable, which means users can fit it for specific purposes. Installing Chrome on Linux is not a direct process, but it is worth it. For one thing, Chrome is a very fast browser as compare to other browsers. It is also easy to access. Unlike in other operating systems, a straightforward installation of Google Chrome is not possible in Linux because it is not available via Software Manager in any Linux distribution, in order to install it you must download it from its official website. For example, if you wish to install Google Chrome in Ubuntu/Linux Mint, which are both most popular Linux distributions, you would have to open the terminal and run some specific commands one by one, or alternatively you can download deb file and double click to open it via installer.
  • Sercos announces availability of open source Sercos SoftMaster Ethernet master software
    Bosch Rexroth has made the Sercos SoftMaster available as free open source software on SourceForge.net. They also offer a free Sercos-on-a-Stick livesystem--a complete stand-alone demo Sercos driver package on a USB thumb drive. This includes the SoftMaster based on Intime Distributed RTOS from TenAsys Corporation, and a test application.
  • Streamlio Launches with $7.5M in Funding to Advance Real Time Applications
    New startup unifies open-source technologies including Apache Pulsar and Heron into an enterprise-grade platform. Building a full platform for real-time data analytics often involved cobbling together multiple open-source projects to get all the requirement components. Typically enterprise don't want to build their own platform, but tend to prefer integrated solution that have already done the heavy lifting of putting all the pieces together.
  • EU-Funded Open Source Service Helps You Sell Data And Protect Privacy
    OPERANDO consortium allows users to have more power over what data of theirs gets shared with online service providers. For instance, when you use the Login with Facebook or Google button on various websites. The control is offered through an open source service called PlusPrivacy which helps users with a one-stop solution, a dashboard where they can manage all their privacy settings from Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, etc. For those who want simple solutions, there is a “single-click privacy” button which sets the settings for all the social networks to their most privacy-friendly values.
  • cron.weekly issue #93: Debian, Git, Jerakia, Lighthouse, hey, load, compression, OpenVPN & more
  • GNOME turns 20, a call for open source voting machines, and more news