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GNOME

What am I doing with Tracker?

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GNOME

Some years ago I was asked to come up with some support for sandboxed apps wrt indexed data. This drummed up into Tracker 2.0 and domain ontologies, allowing those sandboxed apps to keep their own private data and collection of Tracker services to populate it.

Fast forward to today and… this is still largely unused, Tracker-using flatpak applications still whitelist org.freedesktop.Tracker, and are thus allowed to read and change content there. Despite I’ve been told it’s been mostly lack of time… I cannot blame them, domain ontologies offer the perfect isolation at the cost of the perfect duplication. It may do the job, but is far from optimal.

So I got asked again “we have a credible story for sandboxed tracker?”. One way or another, seems we don’t, back to the drawing board.

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Mutter 3.33.4

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GNOME

About mutter
============

Mutter is a window and compositing manager that displays and manages
your desktop via OpenGL. Mutter combines a sophisticated display
engine using the Clutter toolkit with solid window-management logic
inherited from the Metacity window manager.

While Mutter can be used stand-alone, it is primarily intended to be
used as the display core of a larger system such as GNOME Shell. For
this reason, Mutter is very extensible via plugins, which are used
both to add fancy visual effects and to rework the window management
behaviors to meet the needs of the environment.

News
====

* Discard page flip retries on hotplug [Jonas; !630]
* Add xdg-output v2 support [Olivier; #645]
* Restore DRM format fallbacks [Jonas; !662]
* Don't emit ::size-changed when only position changed [Daniel; !568]
* Expose workspace layout properties [Florian; !618]
* Don't use grab modifiers when shortcuts are inhibited [Olivier; #642]
* Fix stuttering due to unchanged power save mode notifications [Georges; !674]
* Add API to reorder workspaces [Adam; !670]
* Make picking a new focus window more reliable [Marco; !669]
* Defer actor allocation till shown [Carlos; !677]
* Try to use primary GPU for copy instead of glReadPixels [Pekka; !615]
* Unset pointer focus when the cursor is hidden [Jonas D.; !448]
* Fix modifier-drag on wayland subsurfaces [Robert; !604]
* Fix background corruption on Nvidia after resuming from suspend [Daniel; !600]
* Only grab the locate-pointer key when necessary [Olivier; !685, #647]
* Misc. bug fixes and cleanups [Florian, Jonas, Daniel, Robert, Olivier,
  Georges, Marco, Carlos, Emmanuele; !648, !650, !647, !656, !658, !637,
  !663, !660, !659, !665, !666, !668, !667, #667, !676, !678, #672, !680,
  !683, !688, !689, !687]

Contributors:
  Jonas Ådahl, Emmanuele Bassi, Adam Bieńkowski, Piotr Drąg, Jonas Dreßler,
  Olivier Fourdan, Carlos Garnacho, Robert Mader, Florian Müllner,
  Georges Basile Stavracas Neto, Pekka Paalanen, Marco Trevisan (Treviño),
  Daniel van Vugt

Translators:
  Fabio Tomat [fur], Kukuh Syafaat [id]

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Also: GNOME Shell + Mutter 3.33.4 Released

Gnome: Pango updates

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GNOME

I have recently spent some time on Pango again, in preparation for the Westcoast hackfest. Behdad is here, and we’ve made great progress on the first day.

My last Pango update laid out our plans for Pango. Today I’ll summarize the major changes that will be in the next Pango release, 1.44.

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Also: Pango 1.44 Is Coming Thanks To The Revival By GNOME Developers

Ubuntu/Fedora GNOME Feud and GNOME's Sriram Ramkrishna

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GNOME
  • Fedora, GNOME Software, and snap

    A question about the future of package distribution is at the heart of a disagreement about the snap plugin for the GNOME Software application in Fedora. In a Fedora devel mailing list thread, Richard Hughes raised multiple issues about the plugin and the direction that he sees Canonical taking with snaps for Ubuntu. He plans to remove support for the plugin for GNOME Software in Fedora 31.

    There are currently two major players for cross-distribution application bundles these days: snaps, which were developed by Canonical for Ubuntu and the Snap Store, and Flatpak, which was developed by Alexander Larsson of Red Hat as part of freedesktop.org. Both systems are available for multiple Linux distributions. They are meant to give an "app-like" experience, where users simply install an application, which comes with any dependencies it has that are not provided by the snap or Flatpak runtime.

    The GNOME Software application has a snap plugin that, when enabled, supports the distribution, installation, and management of snaps. The Fedora project currently provides the snap plugin as a package in Fedora 30, though it is not installed by default. Hughes is the Fedora maintainer for the plugin; he announced his intention to disable the plugin since, he says, he was told that Canonical was not going to be installing GNOME Software in the next Ubuntu Long Term Support (LTS) release.

  • Molly de Blanc: Meet Sriram Ramkrishna

    Sriram Ramkrishna, frequently known as Sri, is perhaps GNOME’s oldest contributor. He’s been around the community for almost as long as it’s been around!

    [...]

    But more than that, GNOME was a project that if you think about it was audacious in its purpose. Building a desktop in 1997 around an operating system that was primitive in terms of user experience, tooling, and experience. I wanted to be part of that.

GNOME: GSOC, GNOME Foundation, GLib

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GNOME
  • Gaurav Agrawal: GSOC Progress by Mid July

    July Marked the beginning of II GSOC coding month. This month our goal is to make the diff bar model as accurate and intuitive as possible.

    One of the biggest thing which I learnt so far is how to contribute on upstream repositories on which our project depends.

    In our case this was with Libgit2, we discovered a bug in Libgit2 while doing our project, and Albfan made this a perfect example to show me how to contribute on upstream, how to raise bugs and how to do discussions for getting it solved.

  • Jean-François Fortin Tam: Available for hire, 2019 edition

    Sometime after the end of my second term on the GNOME Foundation, I was contacted by a mysterious computer vendor that ships a vanilla GNOME on their laptops, Purism.

  • Array copying and extending in GLib 2.61.2

    A slightly more in-depth post in the mini-series this time, about various new functions which Emmanuel Fleury has landed in GLib 2.61.2 (which is due to be released soon), based on some old but not-quite-finished patches from others.

Games in GNOME, New KDE Plasma5 for Slackware and KDE Wiki

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
Slack
  • Andrei Lisita: Getting closer

    Since my last blog post I have been on a short vacation but I have also managed to make some progress on my GSoC project again with guidance from my mentor.

    [...]

    Every savestate also has a creation date which is displayed in the menu, but that’s certainly not as eye-catching as the screenshots.

    There are still many missing features and things that need improving (such as the date formatting) but with every commit I feel that I am getting closer to the finished project.

  • KDE Plasma5 for Slackware, introducing Qt 5.13 in the July’19 update

    Now that all major components of the KDE software stack have fresh new releases, I bundled them for Slackware-current and voila: KDE-5_19.07.

    I have uploaded KDE-5_19.07 to my ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a full installation of Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

  • The new userbase wiki

    When you find a kool feature in KDE software, you can write a small tutorial or just a small paragraph about it and the KDE Userbase Wiki is the right place to publish it. You don’t need to know how to code, have perfect English or know how MediaWiki’s formatting work, to contribute. We also need translators.

GNOME: Summer of Code with Pitivi, GLib 2.61.2 and GNOME's Mutter Picks Up Another Optimization

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GNOME
  • Google Summer of Code with Pitivi

    This summer I am working under the mentorship of Alexandru Băluț to improve the user experience of the Effects feature in Pitivi.

    In the first phase of my project, I worked on redesigning Pitivi’s “Effect Library” to allow users to easily find, organise and utilize their desired effects.

  • g_test_summary and g_get_console_charset in GLib 2.61.2

    Another short post about new APIs, this time from the upcoming 2.61.2 release. This time it’s two unrelated new APIs, which I’m covering together because they’re fairly short.

    g_test_summary() is a new API along the same lines as the existing g_test_bug() function. It’s to be called from within a unit test to provide a summary of the test to the test harness. In contrast, g_test_bug() provides a bug reference for the unit test. In this fashion, the two can be used to provide documentation within the test code of what the test is testing, how it goes about testing it, and which bug it’s checking for regressions in. The summary passed to g_test_summary() might be printed out as a comment in the test logs.

  • GNOME's Mutter Picks Up Another Optimization For Helping DisplayLink-Type Hardware

    Collabora's Pekka Paalanen landed another optimization this week into GNOME's Mutter for further enhancing the performance of using DisplayLink hardware and similar secondary GPUs under this Linux desktop.

    Over the past few cycles we've seen a lot of improvements made for bettering the performance of DisplayLink USB graphics connected displays under the GNOME desktop environment. While the experience has already improved a lot, for GNOME 3.34 due out in September will be more optimizations.

Friends of GNOME Update – June 2019

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GNOME

In April we visited FOSS North in Gothenburg, Sweden and Linux Fest Northwest in Bellingham, Washington, USA. Our table at FOSS North was staffed by Kristi and Neil, and volunteers Bastian, Anisa and Stefano. GNOMEie Zeeshan Ali presented on open source geolocation. Molly and Sri were at LFNW, where Molly spoke about following through on a code of conduct. Kristi participated remotely in FLISOL. There were two hackfests in May, Rust+GNOME 2019 Hackfest#5 in Berlin and Gstreamer Spring Hackfest 2019 in Oslo. We’ll be in Portland, OR, USA in July for OSCON. After OSCON we‘ll be hosting a West Coast Hackfest, July 18th – 21st.

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Also: Librem 5 July Update

Meet Matthias Clasen

Filed under
Interviews
GNOME

I have been involved GNOME for a long time. My first commits to GTK are from sometime around 2002. GTK is where I spend most of my development and project maintenance time. But I’ve been involved in many other parts of GNOME at one point or another, from GLib to GNOME Software.
Apart from writing code and fixing bugs, I am a member of the release team, and do a few of the GNOME releases every cycle. In recent years, I’ve often done the .0 stable releases.

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GNOME Software in Fedora will no longer support snapd

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Red Hat
GNOME

In my slightly infamous email to fedora-devel I stated that I would turn off the snapd support in the gnome-software package for Fedora 31. A lot of people agreed with the technical reasons, but failed to understand the bigger picture and asked me to explain myself.

I wanted to tell a little, fictional, story:

In 2012 the ISO institute started working on a cross-vendor petrol reference vehicle to reduce the amount of R&D different companies had to do to build and sell a modern, and safe, saloon car.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Excellent Free Books to Learn Java

    Java is a general-purpose, concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, high-level programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. It is related in some ways to C and C++, in particular with regard to its syntax, and borrows a few ideas from other languages. Java applications are compiled to bytecode that can run on any Java virtual machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture. Java is designed to be simple enough that many programmers can quickly become proficient in the language. It’s one of the most popular programming languages especially for client-server web applications.

  • GFX-RS Portability 0.7 Released With Vulkan Events, Binding Model Improvements

    The GFX-RS high performance graphics API for the Rust programming language and based on Vulkan while mapping to Metal when on Apple systems is out with a new release. GFX-RS continues to be about being a cross-platform API for Rust that is bindless and high performance while retaining the traits of Vulkan but with back-ends as well for Direct3D 11/12, Metal, and even OpenGL 2 / GLES2.

  • Use the Requests module to directly retrieve the market data

    Hello and welcome back to our cryptocurrency project. In the previous article I had mentioned before that I want to use the cryptocompy module to create our new cryptocurrency project, however, after a closer look at the CriptoCompare API I think we have better used the original API to make the rest call instead of using the wrapper module because the original API seems to provide more returned data type than the one offered by the cryptocompy module.

  • Eli Bendersky: Faster XML stream processing in Go

    XML processing was all the rage 15 years ago; while it's less prominent these days, it's still an important task in some application domains. In this post I'm going to compare the speed of stream-processing huge XML files in Go, Python and C and finish up with a new, minimal module that uses C to accelerate this task for Go. All the code shown throughout this post is available in this Github repository the new Go module is here.

  • How to Use Binder and Python for Repoducible Research

    In this post we will learn how to create a binder so that our data analysis, for instance, can be fully reproduced by other researchers. That is, in this post we will learn how to use binder for reproducible research. In previous posts, we have learned how to carry out data analysis (e.g., ANOVA) and visualization (e.g., Raincloud plots) using Python. The code we have used have been uploaded in the forms of Jupyter Notebooks.

  • Wingware Blog: Introducing Functions and Methods with Refactoring in Wing Pro

    In this issue of Wing Tips we explain how to quickly create new functions and methods out of existing blocks of Python code, using Wing Pro's Extract Method/Function refactoring operation. This is useful whenever you have some existing code that you want to reuse in other places, or in cases where code gets out of hand and needs to be split up to make it more readable, testable, and maintainable. Wing supports extracting functions and methods for any selected code, so long as that code does not contain return or yield statements. In that case automatic extraction is not possible, since Wing cannot determine how the extracted function should be called from or interact with the original code.

  • How to Use Binder and Python for Reproducible Research

    In this post we will learn how to create a binder so that our data analysis, for instance, can be fully reproduced by other researchers. That is, in this post we will learn how to use binder for reproducible research. In previous posts, we have learned how to carry out data analysis (e.g., ANOVA) and visualization (e.g., Raincloud plots) using Python. The code we have used have been uploaded in the forms of Jupyter Notebooks. Although this is great, we also need to make sure that we share our computational environment so our code can be re-run and produce the same output. That is, to have a fully reproducible example, we need a way to capture the different versions of the Python packages we’re using.

  • NumPy arange(): How to Use np.arange()

    NumPy is the fundamental Python library for numerical computing. Its most important type is an array type called ndarray. NumPy offers a lot of array creation routines for different circumstances. arange() is one such function based on numerical ranges. It’s often referred to as np.arange() because np is a widely used abbreviation for NumPy. Creating NumPy arrays is important when you’re working with other Python libraries that rely on them, like SciPy, Pandas, Matplotlib, scikit-learn, and more. NumPy is suitable for creating and working with arrays because it offers useful routines, enables performance boosts, and allows you to write concise code.

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Beautiful Soup is on Tidelift

    I've been doing a tiny bit of consulting for Tidelift for a little over a year now, mainly talking about them to open source maintainers in the Python world and vice versa. (See my October 2018 piece "Tidelift Is Paying Maintainers And, Potentially, Fixing the Economics of an Industry".) And lo, in my household, my spouse Leonard Richardson has signed up as a lifter for Beautiful Soup, his library that helps you with screen-scraping projects.

  • Chris Moffitt: Automated Report Generation with Papermill: Part 1

    This guest post that walks through a great example of using python to automate a report generating process. I think PB Python readers will enjoy learning from this real world example using python, jupyter notebooks, papermill and several other tools.

  • Cryptocurrency user interface set up

    As mentioned above, in this article we will start to create the user interface of our latest cryptocurrency project. Along the path we will also use the CryptoCompare API to retrieve data.

  • Python Snippet 2: Quick Sequence Reversal
  • 10x Evilgineers | Coder Radio 367

    Mike rekindles his youthful love affair with Emacs and we debate what makes a "10x engineer". Plus the latest Play store revolt and some of your feedback.

BlueStar Linux 5.2.1

Today we are looking at BlueStar Linux 5.2.1. This release of BlueStar is an Arch rolling distro and comes with Linux Kernel 5.2.1 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3 and uses about 700MB of ram when idling. Bluestar Linux is a beautiful Arch/KDE distro that works great out of the box and is receiving a lot of love from their very active developer. Read more Direct/video: BlueStar Linux 5.2.1 Run Through

GNU Parallel 20190722 ('Ryugu') released

GNU Parallel 20190722 ('Ryugu') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/ GNU Parallel is 10 years old next year on 2020-04-22. You are here by invited to a reception on Friday 2020-04-17. Read more

today's howtos