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Software

KStars 2.8.5 is released!

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KDE
Software
Sci/Tech

So here comes another minor release for KStars v2.8.5 just less than two weeks after 2.8.4 was released. KStars v2.8.5 is available for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.

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Wine Staging 2.18

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Software

OpenSSH 7.6 and FreeBSD 10.4

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Software
Security
BSD

Asterisk 15 and Evergreen 3.0.0 Released

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Software
  • Asterisk 15 Debuts Advancing Open Source Collaboration Technology with Video

    Digium, the lead commercial sponsor behind the Asterisk open source PBX project, announced the release Asterisk 15 on Oct. 3, pushing the 13 year—old effort into the world of video conferencing.

  • Digium Announces Asterisk 15 Open Source Communications Software

    Asterisk is well known as the standard in open source audio communications and features an expansive ecosystem and installed base. Asterisk 15 extends the power of Asterisk by adding enhanced multi-party video conferencing and collaboration capabilities. With Asterisk 15, business application developers can now create custom audio and video communication solutions within one platform, bridging the gap between modern web-based communications and legacy telephony solutions.

  • Evergreen 3.0.0 released

    The Evergreen community is proud to announce the release of Evergreen 3.0.0, highly-scalable software for libraries that helps library patrons find library materials and helps libraries manage, catalog, and circulate those materials, no matter how large or complex the libraries.

    [...]

    Evergreen 3.0.0 requires PostgreSQL 9.4 or later and OpenSRF 3.0.0 or later.

    Evergreen 3.0.0 represents the culmination of a four-year project to create a web-based staff interface for Evergreen. It includes contributions from at least 45 individuals and 8 funding institutions across the globe.

Software: ListenBrainz, Xfce PulseAudio Plugin 0.3.1, Nuclear Music Player

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Software
  • On the data refrain: Contributing to ListenBrainz

    Methods for generating basic reports, charts, and statistics about listening history are important. They help make ListenBrainz a more interesting platform for a casual music listener, not just a developer. Therefore, my goal was to add a way to add basic reports or specific metrics for presenting to the user in the front-end.

  • Development Release: Xfce PulseAudio Plugin 0.3.1

    A new release, some handy new features! But, I’ve never posted about this plugin before, so we’ll start with a proper introduction.

  • Nuclear Music Player for Multi Source Music Streaming in Linux

    Although I do maintain a collection of good ol’ mp3 files on my PC, I don’t disagree with the advantages of streaming music. I mean, you don’t have to worry about storage. It’s kinda unlimited storage capacity with streaming services.    

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NASA's Eyes Is Still Being Ported To Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

NASA is still said to be porting their "Eyes" visualization software to Linux.

NASA Eyes out of the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) and California Institute of Technology is designed to provide visualizations of various items on Earth and within the solar system.

Visualizations range from viewing wild fires and hurricanes to having solar system tours. Eyes has been available for macOS, Windows, and mobile platforms but with no Linux support.

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Software: DAEMON Sync, Syncthing, Coffee, Hotspot, Chromium, and Skype

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Software
  • DAEMON Sync: Share/Backup Files Over WiFi Without Internet

    DAEMON Sync lets you synchronize or backup your mobile data to computer over local WiFi without any hassle. Unlike any other cloud service DAEMON Sync lets you sync/backup files between devices without having internet connection over local WiFi that means you data never goes through someone else's servers, you can run DAEMON server on computer and let device speak to it directly. It is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, Android and iOS.
    You can backup, browse and share videos and photos and evaluate all advantages of truly secure cloud service. The basic functionality of DAEMON Sync is free for non-commercial use, but other products and advanced features require activation license.

  • Syncthing: Let Your Desktop Be Local Server For Your Mobile Device

    Syncthing is an open-source, free file synchronization application, written in GO programming language, available for almost every operating system Linux, Unix, Windows, Mac, BSD, Android and iOS. It can sync between device that are present on the local network (no Internet required), or between remote devices over the Internet. It is secure and safe since both things are built-in into the application.
    Syncthing replaces proprietary sync and cloud services with something open, trustworthy and decentralized. Your data is your data alone and you deserve to choose where it is stored, if it is shared with some third party and how it's transmitted over the Internet. It should be safe from data loss, protecting the user's data is priority. Developers took reasonable precaution to avoid corrupting the user's files.

  • Coffee is a News & Weather App for Ubuntu Desktops

    Coffee is a new Linux app that helps you to stay up-to-date with current news and weather without needing to touch the new tab button in your browser.

    Inspired by Google Now on Android, Coffee displays a selection of current news headlines from major news publications, as well as weather information for your current location (or any location you choose manually).

  • Hotspot v1.1.0 adds timeline and recording features

    Close to three months after the initial hotspot release, I'm happy to announce the release of version 1.1.0. Quick recap: Hotspot is a graphical frontend to the Linux perf profiler suite.

  • Chromium Appears To Be Advancing Their Linux VR State

    Google's Chrome has offered virtual reality support for a while and most recently will even let you browse the web in VR while the Linux support has lagged behind.

  • Microsoft releases refreshed preview of 'Skype for Linux' for Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, and more [Ed: Lots of Linuxwashing of Skype right now. Never mind if it supported GNU/Linux long before Microsoft took over and sabotaged this support.]
  • Microsoft Rolls Out A Preview Of The New Skype For Linux
  • Skype on Linux gets some design love from Microsoft
  • Skype officially releases their preview for Linux computers
  • Skype for Linux gets a taste of the new Skype

Wine 2.18

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Software

Software: Firefox 56, Python, and MySQL 8 Release Candidate

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Software
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 56 Released, But All Eyes Are on Firefox Quantum

    The latest update to the browser isn’t exactly packed with changes but it does include a new search function in the settings area to make it faster to find specific options or preferences.

  • Screenshots, Send Tabs and more! Today’s faster Firefox provides upgraded features for all users

    When our intrepid user research team goes into the field and observes Firefox users in the wild, they find that users have all sorts of creative solutions to do things that the browser doesn’t already do, like email links and screenshots to themselves and others, as a way to get things done.

    We want Firefox to be the absolute best way to get things done, so we stuffed a ton of new features into today’s release.

  • 3 Python web scrapers and crawlers
  • Oracle Shows Off MySQL 8 Release Candidate

    After over a year of development, open-source database is now on the path toward general availability.

    Back in September 2016, Oracle first announced the open-source MySQL 8.0.0 milestone release and has been quietly iterating and developing the next generation database ever since.

    On Sept. 25, at long last Oracle debuted the first official Release Candidate (RC) for the MySQL 8.0 release, kicking off the final stabilization period before general availability. The MySQL 8.0 release also marks a numbering leap forward, as the current generally available release is version 5.7.19. MySQL 5.7x first became generally available in 2015, after two years of development effort.

Software: Adobe Brackets, Pick, Kube, and Outskirts (Game)

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Software
  • Adobe Brackets 1.11 Released, Is ‘Fully Supported’ on Linux

    A new version of the Brackets text editor is available to download, and Adobe say the Linux build is 'at par with what you get on Mac and Windows'.

  • Pick – A Commandline Fuzzy Search Tool For Linux

    Today, we will be discussing about an Interesting commandline utility called “Pick”. It allows users to select from a set of choices using an ncurses(3X) interface with fuzzy search functionality. The Pick utility can be helpful in certain situations where you wanted to search for a folder or file that contains a non-English characters in their name. You don’t have to learn how to type the non-english characters. Using Pick, you can easily search them, select them and view or cd into them easily. You don’t even have to type any characters to search a file or folder. It’s good for those working with large pile of directories and files.

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  • Last week in Kube

    “Kube is a modern communication and collaboration client built with QtQuick on top of a high performance, low resource usage core. It provides online and offline access to all your mail, contacts, calendars, notes, todo’s and more. With a strong focus on usability, the team works with designers and UX experts from the ground up, to build a product that is not only visually appealing but also a joy to use.”

  • Outskirts is a colourful, clever and difficult bullet-hell shooter that's now on Linux

    Do you like bullet-hell games? Outskirts [Steam, Official Site] is something you absolutely need to look at. The idea is clever and it's quite challenging.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.